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August 13, 1927 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-13

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s

SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1927

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THI

^ N A 'o.

BOOKS OF THE DAY

PECUADILLOS
"The Son of the Grand Eunuch"-by
Charles Pettit (Boni & Liverlight,l
$3.00.)
"It's philosophy is also Chinese-
very Chinese indeed!" explains
Charles Petitt in the preface toI
"The Son of the Grand Eunuch"-a1
wholly unnecessary explanation after
the description in the first chapter
of the exercises incident upon the
going to sleep of His Majesty the
Holy Man, Son of Heaven. Follow-
ing this detailed account of Chines
philosophy translated into act on is
another description of the most sump-
tuous feast in the land with jelly
composed of ten-year-old eggs aged
in the royal dung heap. Without a
doubt, the book is Chinese.
And having solved this problem,
and established his case, Mr. Pettit
proceeds to enjoy himself immensely
throughout 254 pages of entertaining
what-not. He, reminds one of Law-
rence Sterne in his deliberate de-
light in the under side of humor, and
he interjects frequently the contem-
plations "unbilical of the buddas,"'
"Such a stench!" and like phrases
varying from the mildly subtle to the
doubtlessly frank. But he is through-
out exceedingly charming as though
he were openly painting little red
and green figurines in ridiculous po-
sitions and then chuckling to imagine'
how the Boston censors would gasp,
and how other less rigid individuals
would chuckle along with him. '
There is more than once a hint that.
all that is Chinese may not be re-
stricted to the Chinese, too. For in-
stance at the feast, Li Pi Siao, the
Grand Eunuch, 'with truly epicurean
restraint . .inhaled its odor while
admiring the dusky hue of this rare
delicacy. From time to time he
smacked his tongue against his palate,
in the manner affected by the pale-!
face Barbarians when sampling a vin-
tage of wine." There is also a def-
inite "dig" at modern conventionali-
ties in the filial sorrow of the son
upon the death of his brother. Very
touching, yes? .
Mr. Pettit has shown himself an
artistic rogue. He has written a "bit

of history" which one may doubt. It1
is the sort of thing in literature that
a goldsmith or a vase maker would
create in his art. Exquisite but not
compelling as would be the paintings
of Velasquez, the symphony of Han-
del. His characters are artistic little
figures, albeit the women are help-
less little creatures-still they are
beautiful. There is something poetic
in the literary names which he gives
to the eighty and one concubines, Miss
Smile-of-a- Rose-at-the - Dawning - of
Spring and all the rest. Then there
is Violet Town, the pecadillos of the
Khonghouses, and the delicate de-
scriptions, frail as translucent china-
ware, of the pigs in the poisonous
marshes. It is a Dresden china group
of figurines.
There is something aggravating to
a woman in the dolorous sob of the
author upon the freeing of women in
1912. It is hardly fair, but from his
viewpoint with the example of the
tottering (tottering because her feet
were broken at an early age as befits
a lady of taste), Chti, in her gentle
unmoral state, before him, the sub is
understood.
So let us not imagine that Mr.
Pettit, after the manner of Anatole
France or Voltaire has deliberately
set about to picture history and hu-
man foibles without a delightful
sugar coating. He has given to his
reader, a print, done in soft colors
and fine lines emphasized by the most
delicate of shadings-Shall we say
Chinese Philosophy? Yes, Chinese,
indeed!
-M. L. W...

FORD IN "SPIRIT OF
AND LATER F
(By Associ
DETROIT, Aug, 12.-Henry. Ford
sat at the controls of one of his own,
airplanes Thursday and for a few
minutes piloted a notable party, in-I
cluding Col Charles A. Lindbergh,
above Ford airport.
It was Mr. Ford's first exepriencel
at the "stick" and was made possible'
by the dual control of the big Ford
tri-motored planes. One of the ques-
tions unanswered today was "Whatit
would have happened if Mr. Ford had I
'frozen' to the controls?"
"Freezing" to the controls, accord-
ing to local fliers, is not an uncom-
mon occurance in the case of a per-
son handling the "stick" for he first
time, and a severe physical "jolt"
sometimes is necessary to break the
embryo pilot's hold.
Enjoys His First Ride
Harry Brooks, chief pilot of thel
Ford organization, who had charge
of the big Ford plane and sat oppo-
site the motor manufacturer while the
latter occupied a control seat, did not
discuss the possibilities of the situa-
tion.
The flight in the big Ford plane
followed by a few minutes a ride' in
the "Spirit of St. Louis" with Col.{
Lindbergh, which was the first flight'
Mr. Ford ever had made.
Col. Lindbergh and the automobile
manufacturer were inspecting va-
rious .planes houses in the hangars at
the airport.
Suddenly the young colonel said:
"Mr. Ford, I've never had a pas-
senger in the 'Spirit of St. Louis.' I'd
like for you to be the first passenger."
"All right, let me know the next

j
S

ST. LOUIS"
LIES OWN IACHINE
citdPress) uba bu b

time you are here," Ford replied.
"All Right, I'll Go"
"Well, what about this time, right
now?"
"All right. I'll go with you."
Later Mr. Ford said:
"I took a flight because Col. Lind-
berg asked me to as a personal fav-
or. I couldn't help it."
Col. Lindbergh's plane was in
readiness at Ford Airport today for
the trip to Grand Rapids, he next
point on the flying colonel's air tour.
Lindbergh spent the night with
Maj. Thomas G. Lanphier, commander
of Selfridge Field, and flew to the
Ford hangars during the morning in
a Selfridge pursuit plane.
Col. Lindbergh took off at 11:20
this morning for Grand Rapids.
A few minutes after his hop-off, a
Ford plane, carying his mother, Mrs.
Evangeline L. Lindbergh, took off.
CLASSIFIED ADS.
FOR RENT-Upper duplex five rooms,
bath, sleeping porch; garage if de-
sired. 905 orest Ave. Phone 6137.
41, 41, 43
NOTICE--Driving North After School?
Will gladly share expenses, furnish
company, and help drive. Home

11 Iiil

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH

I

PRESBYTERIAN
Huron and Division Streets
Merle H. Anderson, Minister

Division and Catherine Streets
Seventh Sunday After Trinity
July 24, 1927
Henry Lewis, Minister
Thomas L. Harris, Assistant
8 a, m,-Holy Communion.
11 a. m.-Morning prayer and Set-
mon by the Rev. -T. L. Harris.
4 to 6 p. m.-Musicale and Tea at
Harris Hall.

1
I
1

9::30--Church Bible School.

I

10:45-Rev. John T.i
Dearborn, Al i c t i
preach.
5: 30-Social hour and
student group.

ga , will
supper for

6:30-Young
meeting.

People's Society

I

III~

FIRST METHODIST
Cor. State and Washington
Arthur W. Stalker, D.D., Minister
Parley C. Bingham, Associate
Minister and Student Director
Margaret Stair, Student Director
10:30 a. m.-Morning Worship. S'er-
mon, "Relative Values," by Rev.
Bingham.
12:00-Student Bible Class at Wes-
ley Hall. Howard McCluskey,
leader.
6:00 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild devo-
tional service for stuidents, led
by Millard Pryor.
7:0Q P. M.-Friendship Half Hour.

FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
10:30 A. M.-Regular morning ser-
vice, subject "Soul.
11:45 A. M.--Sunday school follow-
ing the morning service.
7:45-Wednesday evening, testi-
monial meeting.
The Reading room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank building, is
open daily from 12 to 5 o'clock,
except Sundays and legal holidays.

near Cheyboygan.
Box 198 and I will
ly.

Phone or write
see you personal-
41, 42, 43.

WANTED-To rent suite for two for
next college year, near campus. Ad-
dress box 199. 42, 43
Subscribe For The
Michigan Weekly

Read The Daily ''Classified" Columns

r

MICHIGAN PINS
FOUNTAIN PENS
ALARM CLOCKS
HALLER'S
State St. Jewelers

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...LA '.BR8KIkrB

SIX'--SON ftLAGANCEBS~T SANS RAPR0CHB"-L'AUTO,

PA R IS

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y OU'RE pro
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bothersome ba
But you actual
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Shredded W

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bably
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I

Through thirty-five years of "Eat this and
that," this pioneer whole wheat biscuit has
captured ever-growing favor. Made of the
most carefully selected wheat grains,
shredded for utmost digestibility and cooked
crisp clear through for appetite enchantment
that's the Shredded Wheat Story.
New appetite appreciation, freedom from
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UNE DAYS ... Youth steps on the gas. A round of
golf. . . sailing, with rails awash . . . tennis . . . a
dip in the surf ... a spin down the road at twilight . ..
June nights . . . white flannels . . . a dance at the
country club. A riot of music. .. white hot. The girl
with the asbestos slippers.., on with the dance. Then
home-the way silvered with June moonlight-in .your
Erskine Sport Coupe.
Dietrich, America's peerless custom designer, has
styled it with the sophisticated Parisian manner for
America's youth. Trim as a silk glove, yet at no sacrifice
of roominess . . . two in the commodious lounge seat
and two more in the rumble seat-just a foursome.
Youthful in its eager performance too. Rides any
road at sixty-smoothly as a drifting canoe. Goes
through traffic like a co-ed through her allowance.
Skyrockets up the steepest hill like a climbing pursuit
'plane. Stops in its own length, turns in its own shadow
and parks where you want to park.
Joyous June, All too short.. . lots of glorious living
to be crowded into one month. Make the most of it-
with an Erskine Coupe-the car that matches the
spirit of Youth.
The ErSkina six Sport Coupe, a Ilustrated, te/ for $993
fe.&b&,faaory, complete with/frent and rear bumpers and self.
wegizing4-wheelbrakes. Seuit at any stdebaker-showros.
ERSKI L5CSIX
EDUP'{T14 LITTLE ARISTOCRAT~

r , y f 11 , ) f .t u..7 C l ,.

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