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August 13, 1927 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1927-08-13

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i

A-

ONLY ONE MORE ISSUE
OF TIE SUMMER DAILY

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:1Iaaitj

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

VOL. VIII, No. 42.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

__
1

I .

I . -1

TILLOTSON GIVES OUT
METHOD ,OF ALLOTTING
SEATS FORFOOTBALL
ALUMNI AND RESIDENTS MUST
APPLY BETWEEN AUGUST
20 AND SEPTEMBER 1

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
Examinations in the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts,
Engineering and Architecture,
and Pharmacy, and in the Schools
of Dentistry and Education will
be given Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday of next week. They
last two hours.
Seven o'clock classes will meet
for examination Wednesday from
2-4; 8 o'clock from 4-6; 9 o'clocks
meet Thursday 8-10; 10 o'clocks
4-6; 11 o'clocks Friday, 8-10; 1
o'clocks 10-12; 2 o'clocks Thurs-
day 10-12; 8 o'clocks 2-4; 4
o'clocks Friday 2-4; and irregular
classes Friday 4-6.

FLOATING SCHOOL FOPC
POSTPONVES START LflhIUAS[AIO I
UNTIL OCTOBER 15
(Special to The Daily) FROM FRENCH RIVALS
.a. w--anmmn+ SW- ../M-A mo..

THOMPSON SLATED!SCOREUS
FOR PHILIPPNE SAC STILL R1SS
... I FOO AS PAIR AWAITS
! STATE COURT REVIEW,

PLAN CHEERING SECTION
Students Will Make Applications On
Single Card; Provide Improved
System or Faculty
Applications for the alumni and
state' residents' s.ections of the 72,-
000 seats in the new football stadium
will be received at the office of the
Athletic Association between Aug. 20
and Sept. 1, according, to H'arry A.
Tillotson, business, manager, and
,drawing .for locations among that set
will be made after the latter date.
More than 65,000 blanks have been
sent out to alumni and former stu-
dents, Mr. Tillotson said. Other resi-
dents of the state if they want tick-
ets should send to the Athletic Asso-
ciation for blank applications, and
mail them in with remittance between
the dates mentioned.
After Sept. 1, all the applications
received will be shuffled and drawing
will be made by a committee com-
posed of one represetative each from
the faculty, the alumni, and the out-
siders..
Price Is Raised
The price of tickets has been
raised, as have those of practically allF
Conference schools, Mr. Tillotson
said. The general admission for the
Ohio Wesleyan game will be $2.00,
with no reserved seats. Tickets for
the Michigan State game will be $2.50
,each, and there will be no limit to

I i
FLIGHT POSTPONED A~
Third Disaster in Three Days Brings
Unanimous Consent of Judges
to Second Postponement
WILL TAKEOFF TUESDAY1
(By Associated Press)
AIRPORT, OAKLAND, Cal., August
12.-The grim hand of death "scratch-
ed" another entrant from the running
in the $35,000 Dole aerial derby to
Hawaii today when Arthur B. Rogers,
former British army flier, crashed in
,his Full Cantilever monoplane while
on a test flight near Los Angeles.
With the wings of three airmen in
the derby now draped by tragedy with-
in three days, the nine remaining avia-
tors at Oakland runway, seemed thank-
ful for the unanimous consent agr
ment last night which caused the 2400
mile race to be postponed from noon
today until next T'uesday noon.
Rogers, who lived in Long Beach,
chine went into a nose dive and felli
chine went into a nose dive an dfell

Announcement has just been mad
that the co-educational Floating uni
versity "Aurania" will sail Octobe
15 instead of September 21 as origi
nally planned. This will necessitat
no curtailment in the itinerary and
will make the visits to some countries
more seasonable, says the Inter
national University Cruise, Inc., wh
will operate the school.
Futher time is needed for organiza
tion under the new president, Dr
Wallace McLaren of the Williams-
town Institute of Politics, the company
says. The quota of 500 students has
not yet been filled.
A special educational program has
been prepared for the cruisers in
Jaipan, and Japanese students will
accompany the visitors as guides.
Adequate transportation arrange-
ments have been made and faculty
members will go with each student
group on shore visits.
Other shore arrangements have
also been made for the stops at
Manila and in Paris. In all places
shore trips are arranged- in conjunc-
tion with official, educational and
student organizations and the tour-
ing faculty will be augmented by
local university professors.
President McLaren was for many
years a professor at Imperial univer-
sity in Tokio and has traveled in the
Far East. His personal contacts in.
foreign countries, say cruise officials,
will greatly facilitate the carrying
out of educational programs on shore
visits. His interest in economics has
resulted in the addition of several
more courses in that subject which
will probably attract many older peo-
ple who wish to make a trip around
the world under educational auspices
rather than as simply tourists.
OBSERVATORY IS
VISITED BY MANY j

- LOTT ASTOUNDS TOURNAMENT
e BY DEFEATING LACOSTE
d 6-4, 6-3, 6-1
- TILDEN DEFEATS BRUGNON
o All-American Finals Of International
Invitation Tennis Matches Will
Be Played Off Tomorrow
(By Associated Press)
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y., August 12.--
A wiry American boy of 20, ,George
Lott, Jr., of Chicago, today scored an
astounding victory over Rene Lacoste
of France, the conqueror of "Big Bill"
Tilden twice in a year. Scores were
6-3, 6-1.
Lott's remarkable achievement in
the semi-finals of the Meadow club'sI
invitation tennis tournament here, was,
a worthy climax to a day which sa'
Tilden himself sweep through to an
easy victory over Jack Brugnon, an-
other member of the French Davis cup
team, 6-2; 6-1; 6-0.
Tilden will meet Lott in an All-
American final tomorrow and the
Davis cup premilinary which both
Tilden and Lacoste sought to avoid,
even to the extent of defaulting, has
been spared.'
In overcoming the redoubtable La-
coste, Lott rose to the topmost heights
of a game that on occasions bore the
mark of genius. His service was
twisted and tricky, his smashing, vic-
ious, his trap shots marvels of deceit.
Even Lott's choppy ground strokes
oftentimes unreliable, slipped over thel
net like pistol bullets.
Lacoste, on the other h'and, was
minus his usual steadiness and missed
the chalklines time after time, ,some-
times by two or three feet.
Both Tilden and Lott were playingj
world-beating games of which they i
are capable when at their best. A'r
constantly rising crescendo of perfect!

A IN TLNNIS SEMITrINALSI

Of
sent
adm
has
succ
ral
CH
't' ie

78 PERSONS ARRESTED FOR PICK-
ETING AND OVER 25 PAY
FINES

SANDERSON OUT OF CASE
;. Puhlie Interest Turns to Iealth of
Men As Sacco Finishes 27th Day
." of Hunger Strike
(By Associated Press)
: ;BOSTON, August 12.-Public atten
tion, which for a week has been direct-
ed largely towards the attorney active
in behalf of Nicola Sacco and Bartolo-
meo Vanzetti today turned to the men
themselves during the lull in the court
and occupied itself with their health
and spirits and their limited doings
in their cellĀ§ in state prison.
S'acco himself set at rest rumors c#
bis collapse by writing in his cell and
walking and standing while in cou-
versation with his physician Dr.
Carmi A. Thompson 1 Joseph McLaughlin. He maintains
Ohio, who headed a committee. his hunger strike, however, through
by the president to report on its 27th day. The length of his fast
inistration in the Philippines, has brought real concern to his wife,
been looked upon as apossible although prison officials today said
essor to the late Governor Gene- that they had not yet begun considera-
Wood. tion of forcible feeding.
Vanzetti broke his fast, already sev-
eral times interrupted since both
Aprisoners first refused food, by accept-
ing during the day liquid foods recom-
mended by, Dr. McLaughlin as best
CAMPUSBUILDINGSKuited to a stomach unaccustomed to
nourishment.
It was learned today that only in
Buildings And Grounds Depart- event of a deadlock will Judge George
dent Reconditions Equip- A. Sanderson of the Massachusetts su-
ment For Fall preme court be called upon to sit with
his four associates who will consider
RK NEARS COMPLETION the case next Tuesday morning. The
law provides that no justice shall sit
an es and alterations a rti on any review of judgment or rulin

the number one person can
$3.00 will be charged for the

buy.
Ohio

like a rock.
airfield, saw

His wife, waiting at the
the accident. Rogers ap-

Wo
Ch

State,, Navy and Minnesota games, and
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Oct. 1-Ohio Wesleyan at Ann.
Arbor.
Oct. 8--Michigan State at Ann
Arbor.
Oct. 15-Wisconsin at Madison.
Oct. 22-Ohio State at Ann Ar-
bor.
Official Opening of New Stadium
Oct. 29-Illinois at Urbana.
Nov. 5--Chicago at Chicago.
Nov. 12-Navy at Ann Arbor.
Nov. 19-Minnesota at Ann Ar-
bor.
the number one person can buy will
be two, three, and four respectively
for those games.
A block on each side of the field,
one from the 35 to 50 yard line and
the other from 35 to 45, has been re-
served for the 5,000 bondholders'
seats. There are 2,500 bonds out-1
standing, and each carries the right
to two seats.
Students To Appy Sept 12
Student applications will be made
as usual, beginning on the first day of
registration, Sept. 12, for freshmen,
and Sept. 14 for upperclassmen.
Actual assignment of seats will not
be made however, until the final day
on which applications are receivable
for the various games, when tickets
will be alloted by classes and within
the classes by order of receipt. Ap-
plications for the M. S. C. game must
be in before Sept. 23, for Ohio State,
Sept 30, and Navy and Minnesota,
Oct. 21. Tickets will be mailed as
usual, not more than a few days prior
to each game.
Student applications this year will
be made all on one card, instead of
having a separate one for each game
as before. This was changed in or-
der to save the students time and
confusion, according to Mr. Tillotson.
Must Send Money
All applications, of whatever type,
must be accompanied by the requisite
remittance. Mr. Tillotson stated that
it is not probable that many will be
refunded due to the large increase in
capacity over Ferry Field. Arrange-
ments have not yet been made re-
garding additional temporary seats
for the Ohio State game, but they

II

parently had tried to use a parachute
when his plane went wrong. His
body was picked up 200 feet from the
demolished plane.
With a daring that was, awe-inspir-
ing, the remaining entrants continued
their preparations for tests, taking the
fatalistic attitude that they are safer
in the air than on th'e 'ground. 1
,The number "13" has surrounded theC
race arrangements.
Originally there were 15 entrants.
Two aviators never obtained planes
after they posted entry checks, cutting
the list to the 13th; the air derby,
will start in the 13th hour of the day;
the original starting date would have
landed them in Honolulu on the 13th;
Lieut. Corbell's monoplane was to
have been the 13th starter until he
crashed to his death. Thee delay in
advancing the starting date gave fliers
opportunity to snatch needed sleep to-
day before resuming their tests. Even
with the added time, however, it was
apparent that all would not qualify by
Tuesday.
TENNIS AWARD
WON BY NAGEL
Elwood Yost Nagel won the All-
Campus Summer Session Tennis
championship and was awarded a
gold medal. Nagel won from Rich-
elson in the final of the tournament,
Richelson as runner-up was presented
a silver medal. The score of the
Nagel-Richelson match was 6-1, 6-3,
1-6, 6-3.
Marsh and Farbman won from
Messmone and Wing, 6-3, 6-2, in the
doubles' finals. Marsh and Farman-
were awarded gold medals.
Nagel and Krickbaum, and Dono-
van and Angell were scheduled to
play in the semi-finals of the All-City
tournament yesterday. The finals are
to be played this afternoon at 2 p.
m. on the Ann Arbor Country Club
court.
Marsh and Nagel are scheduled to
play Garber and Hampso nin the
doubles' finals of the All-City tourna-k
iient this morning.I
indicate that they will be needed.
Cheering sections plans have been
arranged by the Student Council.1
The block will be located betweenI
one 45 yard line and the other 301
yard line, thus including the centerl
section, and is to be about half way
up on the tier of seats. It is em-
phasized that no women will be al-
lowed in this section, and that in

vil" 45 c "IU EL LGQL1V1S re %Ls 1
in vogue in most of the buildings on by him unless the other justices be
in vguein ostof te bildngsonequally divided in opinion.
the campus. A new complete watere Another echo of the attempt t
softener, steam ice melters for the picket the front of the state house in

A record number of Summer ses- tennis wore down their French oppon-
A reordnumbr o Sumer es-ents.
sion students were shown through FOS T
University observatory during the an- FOREST HILLS, N. Y., August 12r-
. , . An unexpected as well as decisive tri-
ln. vsitos niehts this week. ae- -

nua vIOALors gLLb u TTul u, -m
cording to Prof. Ralph H. Curtiss, di-j
C rector of the observatory. Although
the sky was cloudy, 32 people were
shown the telescope and other in-1
struments Monday evening and ob-
servde the moon with the aid of the
projection lantern.
A new record was, established
Tuesday evening and the unusual
had some of the mysteries of astro-
nomy explained to them, and another
record was made Wednesday even-
ing with an attendance of -205.
Those who visited the observatory
Tuesday evenin ghad the unusual
privilege of seeing an earthquake re-
corded on the seismographs. The
mysterious motions of the recording
pen made a deep impression on those
who watched it, since they knew that
somewhere in the distance the earth
was in violent motion, and human be-1
ings probably were suffering and dy-
Iing.
There were the -usual interesting
comments. One coed said the moon
looked like a golf ball, another said
it looked like green cheese as she
had always thought, and a third said
ti looked like plaster.
Members of the observatory staff
were assite din the reception of visi-
tors by Prof. 0. L. Dustheimer of
Baldwin Wallace college, Prof. A. M.
Hawes of Vassar college and Miss,
Laura E. Hill, formerly instructor at
Vassar college and at present Varras
fellow at University of Michigan.
NEWSBRIEFS
(By Associated Press)
RAPID CITY, S. D., Aug. 12.-
Business of the country is calculated
as fair at the summer white house
where President Coolidge received a
first-hand report of conditions today
from Secretary Davis of the Labor
department.
, Mr. Coolidge considers the labor
situation very satisfactory and be-
lieves wages are on a very liberal
basis. He realizes there is some un-
employment in certain lines but
nothing more than the usual lagging
behind which prevails in industries

umph by Mrs. Molla Burdt Mallory, l
veteran American champion, over the
British tennis ace, Mrs. Kattie Mc- j
'Cane Godfree, helped the United States
establish a lead of two matches to one!
in the competition for the Wightman'
cup, international women's team
trophy.
Miss Helen Wills, 21-year-old Cali-
fornian, and Wimbledon champion,l
scored America's other victory with
consummate ease over Miss Joan Fry
by scores of 6-2, 6-0,:taking only 201
minutes to make the match a rout.I
But where this match had been virtu-1
ally conceded to America beforehand,'
it came as a distinct surprise when
Mrs. Mallory, flashing the old-time,
power that lifted her to international
title height a dozen years ago, swept.
aside Mrs. Godfree with almost equal
ease by scores of 6-4, 6-2.
The British team prevented a shut-
out for the day when their doubles
pair, the youthful Misses Gwenel
Sterrey and the experienced Mrs. John
Hill, rallied to pull out an uphill vic-'
tory over Mrs. Charlotte Hosmer Cha-'
tin and Miss Eleanor Goss, the Ameri-
can combination, in a long draw out
and closely contested tussle, 5-7, 7-5,
7-5.
SCHOLARSHIPS !
FOR WOMEN TO
BOSTON UNIV.''
College. of Practical Arts and Let-
ters of the Boston University an-
nounces special scholarships for
women who have graduated from ap-
proved colleges and universities. It:
is planning to offer a limited number!
of scholarships to well-qualified col-
lege graduates who wish to take a
one-year course in "Secretarial
Science" or in the "Teaching of Com-
mercial Subjects in High'Schools and
Colleges."
From the deans of the colleges:
whose graduates are invited to applyl
for scholarships, Boston University
hopes to receive suggestions as to,
recent graduates to whom it might'
be well to send a copy of the cata-i
logue describing the one-year pro-
grams.1

roof, and plastering are among the
improvements being made in the
Lawyer's Club. New concrete benchesj
at the State street end of the Diagonal
will replace the semi-circular ones so
rudely removed by the malignant eni-
gineers last May. Slate blackboards
in Natural Science building are to
replace the old ones and will cost
$800. Cabinet jobs for offices all over
the campus have also been ordered.
In the Dental building, Hyperion
lights will be installed in offices and'
in the library. Old Observatory is be-
ing rejuvenated with repairs, paint-
ings, and papering. Alterations are
also being made in the Library in
the Engineering building, and West
Physics building is being repaired and
painted, and five new offices will be
provided. The laundry will be re-
roofed, and th, long curtains in Uni-
versity High School Library, and in
Alumni Memorial Hall will be dry-
cleaned.
In Barbour gymnasium new Silho-
utte grapes will be added to the equip-
ment to take posture pictures. The
watering system in the Botanical{
Garden is being extended. In Uni -
versity High plans are in progress
for the installation of an elevator
The Law building is being painted on
the interior, and the roof is to be
repaired with slate roofing.
Many smalled jobs are falling tol
the hands of the Building and GroundsI
committee, but when they are all put
together they will make the campus
loo very much altered when the old
students return in September.

protest against the execution of the
nen, which attempts were disrupted
the arrest of 78 persons, was her
in municipal court today. Two men
were fined $20 each and 24 were fined
($5 each.
George L. Peeble of New York, the
only o'ne to appeal, in a statement to
the court said that he felt a double
interest and duty in the case, as an
American-born citizen seeing justice
done to persons from abroad and as
.a Harvard graduate in view of Pres-
ident Lowell's service on the gover-
nor's committee, which he regretted.
Judge Vottoli told him that there was
little excuse for a man of his bith
and education breaking the city ordin-
ance against sauntering and loitering
and assessed a fine of $20.
HOW THEY STAND
American League

W L
New .York............77 33
Washington..... ....56 43
Detroit ... .............58 47
Athletics..............59 51
Chicago..............52 57
Cleveland'..............46 63
St. Louis.............41 66
Boston............36 73

National League
W
Chicago ..................66
Pittsburgh ..............61
St. Louis ...............61
New York .............60
Cincinnati ..............49
Brooklyn ...............47
Boston .............. ...40

Pct.
.700
.602
.547
.536
.577
.422
.383
.330
Pet.
.623
.575
.575
.545
.462
.431
.402

L
40
45
45
50
57
62
62

Phillies...............40 65 .381
the various college deans, the Bos Today's Results
ton University officials in charge of Pittsburg StL 2
this particular work for graduates!Bo y.ork,7.
say quite frankly that they are en- Brooklyn, 6; Ned York, 7.
deavoring to create nation-wide in- ia, on,
terest in the work of the College of
Practical Arts and Letters. Realiz- /0
ing that the girls who take work of
this nature are likely to wish to :
economize as much as possible in
securing their technical training, Bos-
ton University will expect to grant
rather liberal scholarships to the
young women who may be selected ">
to follow the extensive course dur-
ing the academic year 1927-1928.
The list of graduates should reach -Thinks that the weather is likely
the office of the dean at the earliest I to be cloudy and unsettled with ten-

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