100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TODAY'S EVENTS
:O(}--Lecture - "Virgin Is-
lauds." 11r. Robert B. Hall

0, h p

#'ummrr

imrF

41kiit

MEMBER.
ASSOCIATED
PRESS
3,

INT. irTTT TT.. AlAWwr.r n i a ... ..,. .. _.. ,. . __

ern

VUL. VI, No. 4U

ANN ARtU, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1927 PRICE FIVE CENTS

cco

z ETTI

GAT

RESPITE

rU

PROFESSOR DISCUSSES
EFFECT OF PURITANS~
AND PILGRIM, FATHERS!

WHERE RADICALS AWAITED DEATH

DI HYIIA STATES HENRY
NOT DIRECT CAUSE OF
REFORMATION

VIII

MENTIONS JOHN CALVIN
Those Who Had Ancestors On May.
flower Justified To Boast,
States Doctor
"Our whole culture is an effect of
which the 17th .century Puritanism
was the cause," qouted Dr. Albert
M. Hyma, professor of European his-
tory in the University, in his lecture
yesterday afternoon on "The Puritans
and Pilgrim Fathers." "Puritanism
is a phase of the Reformation and
Calvinism, and even of Asceticism.
Calvin himself brought nothing new to
turned from the continent in 1558
states that the Reformation has been
accepted for 400 years all over Eu-

"LINDY" CHEERED
IN DETROIT VISIT
(I' Associated J'resa)
DETROIT, Aug. 10.--Col Charles A
Lindbergh. piloting his beluve
"Spirit of St. Louis," dropped from the
skies early this afternoon to bE
greeted by his mother, Mrs. Evange
line L. L. Lindbergh, and officials an
industrial leaders of the city. ThE
first df the welcoming party to greet
him was Henry Ford.
The hero of aviation grinned boy-
ishly as the motor magnate stepped
forward, hand extended. In another
moment he was surrounded by the
official committee 'of welcome and
received their greetings and wel
comes. Not over 200 persons were al-
lowed within the airport gates.
Then the automobile procession
started forward bearing in triumph
the youth whom Detroit was to receive
in the greatest demonstration ac-
corded an individual in the memory

.
di
e
e
-
d
e
,t

CELESTINO MADEIROS ALSO

I

S 6RANTED R EPIV
BY GOVERN OR'.S COUNCIL

rope by both the Protestants an
Catholics.
"Henry VIII of England is said b
some to have started the Reforma
tion in England," stated Dr. Hym
"but as a matter of fact he didn't hav
much to do with it. It would hav
come to England the same ha
Henry never broken from the Catho
lic church. Henry got special dispen
sation from the Pope to marry h
brother's widow; then after 18 year
of seemingly contented married life
he decided he wanted a divorce, th
cause probably being his friendshi
with a new lady there, rather tha
any qualms of conscience which h
had never evidenced. The churc
refused to grant the divorce, especial
ly as it had been legitimatized b
' special dispensation, so Henry brok
away from the church and he an
his parliament secured his own di
vorce. But he never really becam
a Protestant, so he cannot be calle
the father of the Reformation in Eng
land.
"After 1550 the Lutherans in Eng
land practically disappeared, an
most of the Protestants were Calvin
ists. 'Institutes of the Christian Re
ligion,' by John Calvili became th
favorite. It was also used as a tex
in political science in New England
The work of the Protestants who re
turned from the continent in 1558
was important. There were several
sources of Puritanism in England
among them the teachings of Wycliff
and the migration of the Puritans
from the low-lands of Holland. In
1562 many Puritans left Holland be-
cause they feared the Spanish In-
quisition. In six weeks alone over
200,000 people left, and at least half
of them went to England. These were
the Calvinists, much the same as the
Puritans.
"Holland had reached the zenith of
her power when the Pilgrims went
there, and controlled three fourths of
the European commerce. It was those
men who came to 'America that had
to establish their own homes, cities,
and laws that deserve the credit, not
the greater number who stayed in
Holland. It is only right that the
descendants of the Pilgrims should
feel a certain pride in their birth-
right," concluded Dr. Hyma.
'p Oureather 'anj
---
-Sincerely hopes that It wl not
be warer but, nevertheless, is sorry

I'
a-
a,
ve
o-
n-
is
e
e,
e
p
,n
e
h
-
y
:e
d
i-
e
d
d
i-
e
it
.
8
,
,t

i
1
a
1
it
1'
f
I
t
c
a
a
1
s

- of its residents.
STUDENTS SURVEY
A TTITUDE ON BAN
Undergraduate sentiment regarding
the regents' ruling prohibiting stu-
dents from owning and operating au-
tomobiles after the beginning of the
fall term seems to be nearing the
boiling point, judging by information
~ ~~- obtained through a questionnaire cir-
culated in the University district last
Above is shown an exterior view of Charlestown prison, in the death week by students in the summer
house of which, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, convicted slayers, courses in journalism.I
awaited execution by the electric chair last night. Insets are left, Van- The investigation, which provided
zetti, and lower right, Sacco. To the right above is Warden William Hendry, the first definite clew as to the stu-
the man who was to give the orders for theturning en of the current. dent reaction to the ban, revealed a
somewhat divided sentiment. On thef
SACCO-VANZETTI HAVE H ELD whole, the students seemed inclinedf
STA E ( ('j 'to b loyal to their University, re-!
STAGE FOR PAST SEVEN YEARS gardless of what they might think of
the ban.
(By Associated Press) hSome novel means of locomotiori ap-C
A criminal case which has echoed panied by the placing of bombs, in the pear in prospect and it seems evident
throughout the world began when vicinity of the American embassies at that the campus is due for some goodI
Frederick A. Parmenter, paymaster Paris and Buenos Aires, the American laughs in the fall. Plans to circum-s
legation at Montevideo and other vent the regulations seem to be inter-j
at the shoe factory of the Slater and places in Europe, Mexico and South esting a good many of the students.I
Morrill Company in South Braintree, America. The full significance of the survey,
Mass., and his guard, Alexander Ber- Amria
Several supplementary motions for conducted by the journalism students
ardelli, were shot to death at the I
,a new trial were filed from time to is to be made known th-is morninge
door of the factory on April 15, 1920. time. In March 1923, Arthur Hill, when copies of The Washtenaw Post,,
Bandits who had driven to the factory lone of Sacco's counsel, said that county weekly newspaper being pub-.
in an 1 automobile seized the factory , Judge Thayer was in no way re- lished this week by the students in
payroll of several thousand dollars sponsible for the delays in the case. the summer journalism courses, isf
which Parmenter had brought from Lengthy arguments on the motions placed on sale in the University dis-d
a bank and escaped. were made in October and November, trict. The story of the car ban ques-s
1923. In October, 1924, Judge Thay- tionnaire is to be one of the jeading
zetti entered the case with their ar- er refused all the motions, features of the edition.
rest on charges of murder on May 5, Meanwhile Vanzetti was in the
1920. Almost immediately there state prison. Before his indictment NEWS BRIEFSC
started the efforts to bring about their for murder he had bien convicted of e
liberation which spread over more the attempted robbery of a shoe fac- (By Associated Press) t
than seven years and extended to tory paymaster in Bridgewater earlier KEYSTONE, S. D., Aug. 10.-A'
Europe, Central and South America. in the same year and sentenced to a mighty granite mountain on which a,
Mistaken identity was the claim set term of 12 to 15 years. Judge Thay- memorial to Washington, Jefferson,jf
lorth by supporters of the two men. er presided at that trial also. Lincoln and Roosevelt is to be in- f
Even before they were brought to Sacco had been held in the Norfolk scribed, was dedicated by President C
trial it became known that Sacco, a I * A
agt shoame wrkern ha, and auzetti, county jail at Ledham. There in Coolidge in behalf of the Black Hills
Stoughton shoe worker, and Vanzetti, February and March, 1923, he con- today with an address in which he' D
F~a'
m Plymouth fish dealer, had radical ducted a month's hunger strike. declared that the foundation princ- a
affiliations. Finally three alienists were called in ciples which the four presidents rep-,i
They were indicted on September to examine him and on their report he resented "have wrought into the very c
L1, 1920, and at their trial which was removed to the Psychopathic being of our country." (1
tarted at Dedham on May 31, 1921,
Hos it~a ii JnLt. 1 BlU! U Th h fl f s. . Tf.ha idaL. - stlfi n. odxIman ri for

- WARDEN RECEIVES ANNOUNCEMENT
ONLY 36 MINUTES BEFORE
ELECTROCUTION HOUR
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
STATE PRISON, CHARLESTOWN, Mass., Aug. io.-
Warden Hendry said he had received the information from
11:24 that Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti and Celestino
Madeiros had been granted a respite to and including august 22.
Warden Hendrey said he had received the information from-
Secretary William Reed of the governor's council. He left im-
mediately to notify the condemned men of the respite.
f()OST "N, Aug. 1 .- 'arde" Ilea-
N0 .1dry of Charlestown state prison af.
ter announcing it respite for Saeco
and Vanzetti tonight asked that this
news be field up. Hie did not say that
lthe announcement was incorrect, but
Actin Eimiate Oportnit Ofrefuse([ to be quoted further until
Action Eliminates Opport~uity Of!,
Iyhe received "officifl papers" expected
Preliminary Davis Cup about 1i a. In.
Match i Meanwhile no word had come from
the executive council chambers. Ar-
TILDEN MAY WITHDRAW t1thur It. Hill, chief defense counsel, wa
closeted with the governor and coun
j(By Associated Press) (i di a nesodta i a
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y., Aug. 10.- c1 and it wafs understood that he was
Interest in the actual competition in presenting a further plea for a res
the 44th annual inviation tennis
tournament here today was overshad-
owed by the default of Rene LaCoste e a Sacco and Bartooeo Van
zetti drew near to the midnight hour
and Jacques Brugnon to Donald Fer-
set for their death with the knowledge
achan of Philadelphia and Horace that a judge was withholding decision
!Omser of New York in the first round
on a legal point that might add years
of the doubles play. This action y
or days to their lives.
spoils the prospects of a preliminary, Although the execution of the two
Davis cup match between the teams
of LaCoste and Brugnon and William ondemned radicals was set for
T. Tilden and Francis Hunter. shortly after midnight tomorrow
Another sb dimorning, Judge Sanderson of the
Aohrpossible development ofIMascuetsprmcotyse-
even greater significance was seen in Massachusetts supreme court yester-
Tilden's refusal to say whether he day reserved until today his decision.
would participate in the. singles. upon a bill of exception to a pre-
When questioned on the subject he., --s decision of his own refusal to

replied, "I do not know. I have not
decided yet." He vouchsafed no rea-
son for considering withdrawal.
LaCoste said Brugnon was too tired
to take part in the team play. Brug-
non asserted that both he and La-
Coste were fatigued. LaCoste, how-I
ever, said he would play through in
he singles.
The answer to Tilden's unsettled'

grant a writ of error.
Judge Sanderson's attitude arous-
ed speculation in some quarters as to
the possibility of a last-minute re-
prive.
Governor Fuller, however, continued
silent, on petition for a reprieve ad-
dressed to him.
Meanwhile sympathizers of the two
men, both professed atheists, appeal-
ed to Pope Pius XI and the Protestant

rame of mind seems to be
former champion does not

that the

wish to World Conference

on Faith and Or-

w ijil iv j

I

hazard a defeat at, the hands of his!
own rivals because of its effect onj
America's chances of retaining the
Davis cup. He evidently believes that
victory for LaCoste over the lead-
ing United States defender would in-'
rease the confidence of France to a
angerous degree.

I

der at Lausanne. An appeal was also
made to Mrs. Coolidge to seek Presi-
dent Coolidge's intervention.
In more than a score of American
cities police last night took 'precau-
tions against violence in connection
with demonstrations. Abroad Ame-
rican' embassies and consulates were
under heavy guard wherever there

bot aditdta hywr al-IV5J(U n oSsLOn. !'ere ne was! L e Mas LeeBe SU
both admitted that they were radi- forcibly fed once, then abandoned the are maintained, he said, it will be
cals. When the jury on July14, strike fro which he appeared to because future generation "continue
have suffered no. serious effects. to study the lives and times of the
of murder in the first degree, the While in the Boston institution great men who have been leaders in
tSacco-Vanzetti defense committeeF
t Sacco attempted suicide by striking our history and continue to support
which had been organized to finance his head against a piece of furniture. the principles which those men rep-
their defense aserted that the jurors Only a slight wound was inflicted.! resented."
had convicted the men because they: The alienists on March 27, 1923, de-1 -
were radicals and not because the lared him sane, and he was recom- WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Aug. 10.-
evidence had shown that they had mitted to the Dedham jail. Diplomatic blunders in Paris by Al-
committeed the murders.. 1 In December, 1924, the question oflied statesmen after the end of the,
Judge Webster Thayer of the su- Vanzetti's sanity was brought up. World war allowed the triumphant re-
perior court, whose hometis in Wor- IIn January, 1925, he was taken to the entry of Turkey into European affairs;
cester, presided at the trial. Fred an h osqetls fpetg
aBridgewater state hospital for ob- and the consequent loss of prestig&
H. Moore of San Francisco was chief servation. He was found sane in by Western Europe in the East,1
counsel for the defense. Sentence wasCT Count Carlo Sforza, Italian diplomat,;
1 (Continued on Page Three)
stayed pending motions for a new ;said in an address at the Institute of,
trial.4 , BASEBALL SCORES Politics tonight.
On December 24, 1921, Judge Thayer ___iCount Sforza, who was sent by the
denied the first of these motions. At (By Associated Press) Italian government after the war as
about the same time there occurred American League Italian high commissioner to Turkey,J
the first of a series of demonstrations !-Detroit, 2; St. Louis, 1. said that following upon the destruc-1
in foreign countries by sympathizers! New York, 4; Washington, 3. tion of the Greek front in August
with Sacco and Vanzetti, in the form I Philadelphia 12; Boston, 2. 1922, by the reconstituted Turkish
of a protest by a labor committee at Cleveland-Chicago, not scheduled. army and4 the loss of his throne by
Milan, Italy National League ! King Constantine, the Turkish na-;
In the years that the case dragged New York, 8; Pittsburgh, 3. tion rejuvenated by the Nationalists,1
along there were Sacco-Vanzetti Philadelphia, 6-1; Boston, 0-5. 1commenced a successful return to
demonstrationAs nme n them onm 01,n'.

L

unde hevbuadw~vu~ h~'
LIBRARY SERVICE GIVES d eenat any inimation of protest
EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT Operativesof WFOM, recently pur-
The exhibit of University high chased by the Debs Memorial fund,
broadcast programs of the last min-
brnilhnv nfncn ovn n

scooliorary extension service ma ute fight for their lives, announcing
terial in room 112 of the University that the death scene also would be
high school will continue through- broadcast if the execution was car-
out today. ried out.
The exhibition is featuring current Margaret Wilson, daughter of Wood-
pamphlet material with special refer- row Wilson, was among those an-
ence to administrative problems, the nounced yesterday as seeking clem-
teaching of English, economics, the oency for thednten.
social sciences, public speaking, and' A group of literary and intellec-
dramatics which is of particular in- tual notables from New York, includ-
terest to executives and teachers in ing Dorothy Parker and John Dos
secondary schools. There is also on Passos, authors, and Margaret Tuck,
exhibition a collection of juvenile secretary of the New York Civic
calssics in deluxe editions. club, were arrested while picketing
All of this material may be bor- the state house in Boston where Gov-
rowed during the year free of charge ernor Fuller was in conference Bond
by any Michigan citizen. was promptly available
CLASS HOLDS FINAL DANCE HALL TO GIVE LECTURE
The final meeting of the class in "Virgin Islands" is the title of the
social dancing will be held from 7:30 illustrated lecture to be delivered at
to 8:30 tonight in Barbour gymna- 5 o'clock this afternoon in Natural
sium. Jim Cross's orchestra will { Science auditorium by Mr. Robert B-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan