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August 04, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-04

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TODAY'S EVENTS
5:041--Lecture on the Phiflp-
pines-Dr. Carl E. Guthe.
j8:15-Shakespeares's "Com-
edy of Errors"--The Rock-
ford Players.

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4
MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. VIII, No. 34

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

WASHINGTON IS DIViDED
IN INTERPRET&TION OF1
COLIDGE WHDR&AL
TELEGRAMS ASKING PRESIDENT
TO RECONSIDER ACTION
COME IN DELUGE
IAPITALIS STUNNED
Many Think President Is Definitely
Out Of 1(unning; Others Say He
Will Accept Party Call
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 3.-As many
politicians and poltical observers here
think, President Coolidge's statement I
that he is not "choosing to run in

CHICAGO SCHOOL
SUPERINTENDENT
WILL SPEAK HERE
Both Men's and Women's Educa-
tional clubs meet for the last time
this summer at a banquet of the com-
lined organizations which will be
held in the ballroom of the Union on
Tuesday evening, August 9, at 6:30I
o'clock.
Supt. William McAndrew, of the
Chicago public schools, is to be the
speaker. Mr. McAndrew at present is'
in the limelight because of his dif-
ferences of opinion with Mayor
Thompson concerning history text-
books and several administrative acts
dealing with the junior high schools
and the Chicago Teachers' federation.
Mr. Andrew was graduated from
the University of Michigan in 1886,1
and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
From 1886-1888 he was superinten-
dent of schools at St. Clair, Michigan,

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NEW PRIZE FOR A TLANTIC HOP

SECRETARY HOLDS D I [tII
FULLER'S R E P OR T ' IIIUUIQd[. LIP
ON GANGLEADERS
LATE BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
BOSTON Au. 3.-Gov.eAlvivePEA
Fuller tOlliglit refu ed execuitive I

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$r9EY5' OIi..

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(leniency to Nicola Sacco and iBar-
toloue-o Vanzett . Their reprieve ex-
pires on Aiigs4 10.
BOSTON, August 3.-When Gov.
Alvin T. Fuller entered the state
house tonight he carried a small
satchel brief case, and was accom-
panied by Capt. Charles E. Ceaupre
of the state police and Corp. Georgef
Smith ,his bodyguard. Secretary Mc-
Donald then told waiting newspaper-E
men that the Governor's statement on
Sacco and Vanzetti would be givent
out at 9:40 or 10 o'clock.
Twenty minutes after entering hisr
office the governor came out and said

To the aviator who first completes Herrick Trophy in honor of Myron
a hon-stop flight from Paris, France T. Herrick. Herrick is shown above
to Cleveland Ohio, between August 6 with a map of the flight. After Au-
and August 28, goes a prize of $30,- gust 28, $5,000 of the prize money willI
000, which will be known as the be withdrawn.
MDRUIITLIIT "0 1FACULTY SOLOISTSi
III,3.IIU I'IIJ UUIALi L LDELIGHT AUDIENCE

1928" has created a most unique po- I
after which he went to Hyde Park
litical situation. high school in Chicago for several
Some leaders look to him for amore years. Mr. McAndrew was responsi-
definite pronouncement at least priv- ble for the organization of Washing

ately, but those who have observedI
closely Mr. Coolidge's course over
the years felt that he will amplify
his statement at this time.
Many were inclined to accept it
as meaning that the President was de-
finitely out of the running, but there
were those who still regard the brief
announcement as leaving the way
clear for him to accept the nomina-
tion if the party forced it -upon him.
Opinion Divided
While none of them would talk forl
publication, some prominent Repub-,
licans felt that the way was open now
for other aspirants of nomination
to have their campaign put under way,
something they have been impotent
to do a3 long as Mr. Coolidge had
said no word as to his own inten-
tion. ;
Those who r gard the President's
word as susceptible of two interpre-
tations, said the political situation
was no clearer now than it was be-
fore Mr. Coolidge issued his ten-word
statement; that friends of other eli-
gibles would hesitate to launch booms
for their favorites until they had as-
surance that Mr. Coolidge had 'defi-f
nitely eliminated himself.
Interested In Comments
A tremendous stack of telegrams
was laid before President Coolidge
today, attesting the wlespread reac-
tion afld surprise with which the
country has met hi.; statement that he
does not choose to run for another
term.1
They came from everywhere, 'and
while they were not made public, they
were said to convey the expressions
from political leaders and friends in
virtually all of the states.E
Mr. Coolidge had scarcely left hist
office yesterday after making his un-
expected statesmen before the,. wires
became busy.f
In the midst of all this hubbub,z
Mr. Coolidge settled back into his
accustomed way of saying nothingt
once he has made his statement, ap-
parently content to let the country{
place such interpretation upon it as
it chooses. He was interested, how-c
ever, in the comment his pronounce-{
ment aroused and he examined closelyl
all data that came to him from va-
rious suorces.
Aides Speculatet
While the President withheld fur-

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ton Irving high school in New York!
City, where he was assistant superin-
tendent of schools from 1914-1924. He
has been in his present position in
Chicago for the last three years. 'uneral Services Will Be Conducted
At the corresponding banquet last Iin St. Andrews Church At
summer about 350 persons were in Three O'clock
attendance to head Dean Voelker, of
Battle Creek college, speak on his WAS MARRIED 55 YEARS
mora'1 symposium, "Training the
moral. .mouBurial of Mrs. Harry B. Hutchins,
Heart.''
S'uperintendent McAndrew has not wife of President Emeritus Hutchins,
yet announced the subject of his who died Tuesday night, will bp to-
speech..morrow afternoon, it was announced
last night. Services will be held in
St. Andrews chiurch at 3 o'clock.
Mrs. Hutchins died suddenly, at her'
y.L ;home at 508 Monroe St., having been
in apparent good health during the
TAT day, according to members of the
TTHIGHSCHOOLS ly.
She was married to Dr. Hutchins in
Wakefield Superintendent Of Schools 1872, while be was on the faculty of
To Be One Of Inspectors the literary college. Later she lived
Linder Edmionsonfor eight years in her home town of
-r nMt. Clemens, where her husband was
IWAS ILLINOIS INSPECTORin a law firm. S'he accompanied him
ANN Cornell university in 1887, where I
The appcintmicit of Mr. Arthur he founded the law school. In 18951
Clevenger as as inspector of high they returned to Ann Arbor, and havei
~resided here ever since.
schools for the University has just s Hhin wasr sn ee
Mrs. Hutchins was a inember of
been announced. Mr. Clevenger will the Colonial Dames, Daughters of the
se a member of the Division of Uni- American Revolution , the American
versity Inspectors of High Schools,o on e me
;Association of University Women,

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B Miriam Mitchell that he would not wait for the secre-
it is rarely indeed that an Ann tary to give out the report. "I will
have no statement to make other than
jArbor audience is. favored with two,
uh ais s s b the report, which will speak for it-
suh d artist sla t1ri Man r ble FR oss self," he said.
IRh~'ad and Mrs. Marian Struble Free-IThe governor, who has worked on
man ,especially in a summer concert. the Sacco-Vanzetti case for nearly
There is that in music which helps three months said he was very tired
us to transeend the commonplace ajid and was going away to rest. He de-
the routine in life, and we were giv- clined to make a public declaration on
en that something last night. From leaving the state house, to guard his
the figr;t strains of the Beethoven I being disturbed.
Sonata to the "Liebesfreud," the au- In reply to a question he said the
dience was entranced, and it was with decision would be of seven typewritten
a Bigh that we came back to earth pages. The governor added: "I am
again. very sorry not to oblige you with an,
Tlie three movements of Sonata interview. I can truthfully say I am
Op. 12 No. 1, by Beethoven, were per- very tired and I trust the report will
feet in their presentation. The Alle- speak for itself. I would prefer not!
gro con brio was carefully measured, to .indulge in any supplementary
axad the Tema con Variazioni had a statement at this time."
particular appeal and beauty.I
'M e. Rlead is undoubtedly an ar- a TT
Us. Hero playing is that of one
ST T NT N I i

which is under the direction of Dr.t
.1 B. Edmonson.I
Mr. Clevenger has been serving asC
superintendent of schlools at Wake-'
field, Michigan, for the past six years.
The Wakefield school system employsI
sixty-six teachers and is ranked ast
one of the most progressive systemse
in the upper peninsula. Prior to his!
appointment at Wakefield, Mr. Clev-
enger was one of the assistant-inspec-
tors of high schools at the University.
of Illinois.
Mr. Clevenger received his B.S. de-;
gree from Earlham College in 1911,1
specializing in engineering mathema-1
tics. He has since received on M.A.!
degree from Columbia University
and has also been awarded a certifi-
mate from Columbia as a school sup-1
erintendent. He has completed a year
of additional graduate work and is
expected to complete his work for'
his doctorate at the University of
Chicago within a short time. He is!
now enrolled in the Summer session.
of the University of Michigan.-
Mr. Clevenger was an officer in

the Ann Arbor Women s club, the
Ladies Library association, and the
Classics club. She is survived by her
husband, a son, Harry C. Hutchins, of I
New York City, a granddaughter, May
Hutchins, a sister, Miss Pandira
Crocker, of Ann Arbor, and two broth-
ers, Martin Crocker," of Mt. Clemens,
and Samuel Crocker of Algonac.
DlANCN(G CLASS TO CONTI E
The class in Social dancing for
nen and women will continue in Bar-
bour gymnasium from 7 to 8:30 to-!
night and Tuesday and Thursday oft
next week.
WOMEN'S TEA POSTPONEI)
The Women's League tea in honor
of the Rockford Players has been
postponed because of the death of
SIrs. Hutchins.

whow' soul is wrapped up in her mu-
sic. The quiet of Raff's "Eglogue"
left the audience in a trance broken
only by the final ringing applause.1
"Jigaudon," 01). 204, by Raff, was in
contrast to "Egloque." The Etude in
D Flat was the crowning glory of
lhz perforiance. Mrs. Rhead show-
e, a perfect mastery of the difficult
I is7t number, even when she was
left in darkness twice. For the first
time at the concerts this summer an
encore was demanded. Mrs. Rhead
responded with "Nightingale," by Ala-
bieoff-Liszt.
It is small wonder that Mrs. Free-
man received the personal vompli-
nients of Bing Rama VII of Siam, if
her playing last night was a sample
of what she played for him. The
ease with which she played the Pug-{
nana-Kreisler "Praeludium"'und Al-
legro reminded us of the freedom withj
which Krcisler himself plays it. The
familiar strains of "Nocturno" by
Chepin-Sarasate was very soothing j

GS OAL 0OFEXCURS1ON~l
Special Busses I1i Be Provided
For Jackson Visit; lndustry
To Be Studied
IS EIGhTH SUMMER TRIIPf
Prison industries and recreational
facilities will be the point of inves-
tigation of the eighth University ex-
cursion of the Summer session to,
the Jackson penitentiaryp Saturday
morning. Both the main prison and
the annex three miles from the city
will be visited.
Special busses will be provided,
leaving Anglee hall at 7:30 in the
morning, and returning at 12:15.
Those planning to take the busses
must make reservations by Friday in
room 8, University hall. The price
of the round trip will be $1.50.
Industries which will be inspected
include the stamp plant, granite shop,
cannery, machine shop, cot factory,E
textile factory, binder twine mill, printT
shop, wood shop, cement plant, and
farms. Mr. W. F. Hopp, prison chap- f
lain, will be in charge of arrange-
ments for the trip.

OUTLINES DEVELOPHENT OF -IN-
TEWSNATIONAL COOPERATION
FROM BEGINNING
NOTES TRANSITION STAGE
States Faith In League Of Nations
As "Medium Of Expression
Of Impulses"
"International cooperation is in a
transitional stage. We ipay be now
laying the foundation for a future
edifice of international peace and
justice," stated Prof. Edwin D. Dick-
inson, *of the Law School, in his lec-
ture, "The Progress of International
Cooperation," yesterday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium.
Nates Cooperation Growth
On his lecture Professor Dickinson
noted the development of Internation-
al cooperation from its beginnings
early in the nineteenth century to
the present day. lie cited as an ex-
ample the conferences on methods of
communication and transportation
mtrtienng e5'v1ynn V th" postal ser-
"iL" w+L LI C; 1 1 i, LiJ,1 L iV td iJiiiYep.'
sal Postal Union in 1778.
The International Union of Weights
and Measures was mentioned aa'r-
C .* ~ s men .un d s . an.
estalislau in 183. linportant al o
were the negro slavery and whi a
r."ar n. es, the former first
coming up at the Congress of Vienna
in 1815, although a formal resol-
tion was not passed until 1890. Dav'd
V uben, of California, was noted 1y
speaker fcr his efforts for an i m
ei national. agreement. on. agricui..
'uce. Luben's work resulted in the
International Inc' itkte of Agricultu:t'
which is now an existence at Rome.
Cite L eagn eOf Nations
Dr. :Dickinson characterized the
League of Nations as "a definite me-
dium thrcugh which international
implises might find definite expres-
Sion," and stated tat this league has
accomplished more in the pastseven
years along international lines tha
was accompiished by all the different
miscellaneous congresses of the
nineteenth century.
FIF TEEN AVIATORS
ENTER FOR FLIGH T
(13 YAssociated Press)
SAN FRANCISCO, August 3.-Fif-
teen aviators, three of whom are ex-
pected to brave alone the perils of
flying over the Pacific tonight, were
entered in the great aerial derby for
65,000 in prizes for the mainland to
Hawaii, on August 12.
Closing of the official entry books
at midnight last night found an array
f civilian flyers competing with sev-
ral Army and Navy flyers for the
honey offered by James B. Dole,
ealthy pineapple grower, for the
irst crew to land on the island after
2400-mile hop from Sn Francisco.
The men who expect to make the
ight unaccompanied by navigators
.re Arthur T. Goebel, of Santa Mon-
ca, Calif., flying the monoplane Major
ivingstone; B. Irving, of Berkeley,
alif., also using a monoplane; and
'rederick A. Biles, Detroit, flying a
iplane.
BASEBALL SCORES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Detroit, 6-6; New York, 5-8.
St. Louis-Washington, rain.
Cleveland, 2-4; Philadelphia, 9-7.
Chicago, 1; Boston, 3.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Brooklyn, 0; St. Louis, 4.
Philadelphia, 6; 'Pittsburgh, 9.
Boston, 1; Chicago, 12.

- 4 -
-Prognosteates that it will he
air and warmer today.

anl beautiful. Mrs.
of those '<quiet iare
only pays a violin

Freeman is
artists who
faultlessly,

one
not
but

makes her violin talk in a language
that has a lasting and impressive ap-
gal, Kreisler's "La Gitana" was at
(Continued on Page Four

THREE WHO MAY BENEFIT BY COOLIDGE WITHDRAWAL

is

ther comment, the Summer White i .e United tates arm during theI
House was swept into a frenzy of World Wam and ose to the rank of!
speculation. Far from the centers of! adj. a : tJ & >''Inspector General,
population where #news is not readi- Ae nam
ly accessible, meniber of t:e P resi- I an;lerance.
dent's party contented themselves i1r. C evenger v.ill devote his en-
with discussing their own views of ti .{ tni to the inspe tGn (f lign{
the unprecedented development and scrhNols under the general direction'
with looking forward to what bearing Lr'cctor Elao.i:on, who w
the statement might have on the re- placl' in charge of the Division of
mainder of the sur vmer here. Uni v laiay Inspection aL thc icebLair y
As the first news of Washington's meting of the Board of Regn .;
recation to Mr. Cooli:U'ms announce-__
ment began to triek'e in. there was a 1 PRESIDENT'S REPORT READY
general movement t)xvard the execu-
tive offices to d ttermine whether it President Clarence Cook Little's
would not Yprovoke additional enlight- first annual report, covering the aca-
ment. It tailed to do so. demic year of 1925-26 has been pr,-
pared, and is ready for distribution at
(By Associated Press) the Secretary's office, according to an-
BERLIN, August 3,-The longest nouncement issued yesterday.
distance ever attained in commercial
radiophoning-a stretch of 7500 miles, NO CHANGE IN EXAMINATIONS
-was achieved tonight when wireless Examinations for the Summer ses-
telephony was successfully inaugurat- sion in all schools and colleges will
ed between Berlin and Buenos Aires, be held without change from the
Argentina. Greetings were exchanged schedule given on page 33 of the
between Berlin and Argentine gov- Summer session, it was announced by
ernment officials. Dean Edward H. Kraus yesterday.

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111111 1111111 111111 I IEliii 1j11 1 Ill 111111 f I~ 1lI IEII 1 1 1 1111111 1111
Left, Frank O. Lowden, former governor of Illinois, an advocate of the farm interests; Center, Nicholas
Longworth-, Speaker of the House of Representatives; and right, Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover, who
are among the candidates mentioned as possibilities for the Republican presidential nomination in 1928, fol-
lowing the annoincement of President Coolidge that he "does not choose to run."

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