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August 02, 1927 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-02

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1927

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session'by
thje Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions,
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,E
-~ostoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $r.so; by mail,
$2,00.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ain Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
31ANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP C. BROOKS
Editorial Director......Paul J. Kern
City Editor.....Joseph E. Brunswick
Feature Editor...Marian L. Welles
Night Editors
John E. Davis H. K. Oakes, Jr.
T. E. Sunderland Orville Dowzer
Reporters
Robert E. Carso Miriam Mitchell
Wi. K. Lomason Mary Lister
Bert Heideman W. Harold May
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURANCE J. VAN TUYL
Advertising .............Ray Wchter
Accounts..........John Ruswinckel
Assistants

one that will promote mutual good'
will.
Our southern neighbors are often
criticized because of their frequent
coup d'etats, sudden revolutons, and
unceremonious over turning of the po-
litical tables. In fact it seems to be
felt that the South American has little
capacity for genuine patriotism and is
usually a brigand ready and anxious
to follow some insurrectionary leader.
It is the same idea that Caesar ex-
pressed concerning the Gauls who, he
said, were constantly desiring a novis
rebus-a new order of things.
But will a broader consideration
warrant the accusation that the S'outh
American lacks patriotism? Rather
is he not intensely patriotic in har-
mony with his emotional nature and
is not the difference between his pa-
triotism and that of the citizen of the
United States caused by the differ-
ence in the object toward which his
patriotism is exercised?
In the United States we have pos-
sessed since the pristine settlements
of the colonists what is called a social
heritage, which although slowly being
modified in the course of years, never-
theless has existed and has exerted a
potent influence.
This heritage consists of general
ideals as to form of government and
individual freedom of action, general
ideals of justice built up by long years
of judicial practice, and general ideals
in regard to religion and habits of
living which are vitally'ingrain in the
race. Every Amercan is patriotic to-
ward this general social heritage even
though he may disagree in many mat-
ters with his fellow beings and de-
velop a factional spirit.
Since this heritage is a rather con-

C. T. Antonopulos S. S. B
G. W. Platt
Night Editor-H. K. OAKES,

3erar
JR.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1927
A SCHOOL OF ETIQUETTE FOR

GUNMEN stant factor by which the North Amer-
Rev. Alexander Adair, evangelist, ican is regulated, therefore his patio-
who aided Jesse James when that ban- tism is not characterized by unbidden
dit was at the heyday of his power, fluctuations, but with the South Ameri-
has made a sweeping indictment of the can it is not so. No heritage has been
present day bandits by declaring that developed in his country and become
they are not gentlemen. The bent ingrain in his nature. His patriotism
and gray haired survivor of the gang is exercised toward some leader who
that terrorized the West says that Mr. seems to offer an opportunity for bet-
James and his cohorts always paid the tering his condition. His patriotism is
highest respect to women, and that loyalty to that leader but since the
they never shot unless threatened. leader has no governor on the ma-
They were after money, not blood, he chine of his temper and there is no
says. order of things, no heritage to be dis-
Compared with this enticing picture rupted, he purses the easiest and very
the present day bandit and gunman, natural method of recourse to force.
crazed with dope and bootleg kerosene The patriotism of the common people
becomes uncouth tyro at the hold-up in this condition of affairs can rest on
business. The profession of banditry no very rational and stable basis but
has been in a slump for a long time, fluctuates from one leader to another.
and the numbers of the profession Thus coup d'etats result.
have not commanded the respect from Experience, however, is a very im-
the general public which they deserve; pressive and compelling teacher. Hu-
and Reverend Adair's analysis opens a man beings determine through making
new avenue to the gunmen.. The crit- mistakes and after years of experi-
icism suggests a solution. mentation what finally comes to be re-
If our bandits are uncouth and not garded as the course that provides the
up to former standards it is time we greatest possibility for their pursuit of
raised the trade to the rank of a pro- happiness. Thus a heritage is evolved.
fession and established bandit schools,: T'he South Americans seem to be in,
where the fine points of bandit eti- this stage and hence patience and for-
quitte could be inculccated. College bearance are not inappropriate, since
graduates, would do if no one could be no doubt conditions will improve if we
found, but the average college gradu- give them a chance.
ate has only a broad cultural educa- -
tion, which only in a small measure, EDISON INCORPORATES
fits him for any field requiring the Of little interest compared with a
specialized technical training of ban- championship golf tournament, but of
ditry. quite as much significance, is the an-
Perhaps the oil combine or the nouncement by Thomas Edison of in-
movie producers could write the text- corporation for raising of rubber as
books for this new school, for its a research venture in New Jersey.
training should be of an intensely Rubber, as is well known, is the only

ROLLS
WHEELER
TRYS TO
ARGUE
IN THE CURRENT ISSUE of that
glory of glories, "Vanity Fair," there
is printed an article written that that
foolish, or should we say famous man,
Wayne B. Wheeler. He is connected
with prohibition and what not, as all
men know. In this article he tries to
answer an argument set up by that
terror of prosecuting attorneys, Clar-
ence Darrow. It seems that the dry
Wheeler is trying to say that prohibi-
tion is the safeguard of personal lib-
erty and rights.
* * *
THE MERE STATEMENT OF such
an attitude is funny enough to fill a
whole Rolls column, but the dear man
makes such a funny argument that
we cannot resist the temptation to say
more. It seems that this Wheeler per-
son thinks that it is his personal lib-
erty not to see drunken men on the
street. Also, it is his personal liberty
which is abused when he has to pay
taxes to send the children of drinkers
to school. It seems that when men
buy drinks they do not pay taxes, ac-
cording to Mr. Wheeler._
* * s
HE ALSO OBJECTS THAT when he
voted his county, city, ward and state
dry in successive elections, liquor con-
tinued to flow in from the "wet" dis-
tricts about his home community. This
he said was a ninfringement on his
personal liberties. He hesitates to
mention that the inflow of liquor must
show that there were people there to
drink it, and perhaps he had abused
their personal liberties by denying it
to them. He adds that he helped
make the country dry because of this
inflow from communities which were
not dry. May we naively suggest that
he nowtry to vote the world dry to4
keep out the liquor which some how
or other finds its way to the United
States.
* * *
BUT THIS IS GETTING too much
like an editorial and we will close
with the words that Mr. Wheeler is
not a bad sort of fellow, but a little
study in elementary argumentation
would help his cause.
* * *
SCENARIO CONTEST ENDS
ROLLS SCENARIO CONTEST is
over and the judges have come to the
following decision:
"To the several conductors of Rolls:
Since we have been engaged in the
task of picking a winner we have had
a good time. Some of the scenarios
submitted were almost worth printing
or taking or something like that. How-
ever, since the purpose of the contest
was but a poor attempt to increase
circulation so advertisers could be
told of the powers of the paper, and
the contest failed, we feel vindicated
in our judgment. Our judgment was
that the scenarios should all go where
they belong, in the waste basket.
The Judges"
NO NEWS FROM ROLLS
EXPEDITION
THE EXPEDITION SPONSORED
by Rolls which was to visit the Dako-
tas this summer and with two mem-
bers of the political science depart-
ment to study Republican party cam-
paign funds has not sent any wireless
reports to Ann Arbor. It seems that
the party forgot to take its transmit-
ting set along and that may account
for some of the difficulty. On the
other hand, none of the staff remaining
at home has a receiving set so it is

hoped that the party is safe. There
was some fear expressed at official
headquarters last night, that the party
had found the report of the last Re-
publican and perhaps the last Demo-
cratic presidential campaigns and was
lost in a maize of figures. In case
they are not found in a short time the
rescue party will try to find them.
AND ALL THIS REMINDS us of a
little love poem written by a dear
friend of ours some yearsago to his
lady love, which we print:
What I Like About You .. ..
It's not your eyes, though they are
bright
As stars upon a summer night;
It's not your lips, though they are red
As hues upon a poppy spead;
It's not your hair, though it is gold
As molten metal in the mold;
It's none of these ephemeral things,
Which to me greatest pleasure
brings.
But do not therefor think I flout you,
It's just my arms I like about you.
AND THAT'S that. -Jeb.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LECTURES STILL
BEING HELD
Rolls has been requested to an-
nounce that the University lectures
are still in progress, even though the
student body has apparently forgotten
them.

FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM
802 E. Washington
One block from Hill
Auditorium

in the

Edgeworth

flavor

KILLED REPAIRI

While you are here for the summer
get a Rldet
You will enjoy it the rest of your life.
Made in Ann Arbor
Rider's Pen Shop
315 State Stweet

HALLER'S
Staite Street t
Jewelers
R AE
BUDDY-ROOSEVELT
In
Code of the Cow Country
(Its a Western That's Different)
Thu -Fri-a'onrad Nagel in
"THERE YOU ARE"
:°RAE a

QUICK SERVICE

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practical nature from men who have raw material needed in the manufac-
risen to the top in the business. Prop- ture of motor cars which America
er methods of accosting and relieving does not produce, and the discovery
of funds, combined with a pleasant of some practical method of raising it
bandit's smile, to supplement the would be a boon to the tire makers.
show-girl's smile, would have to be in- It is to men such as Edison that
cluded. Certain it is that Reverend America owes the greatest debt of the
Adair has struck at the whole root of generation. ,Lindbergh may be spec-
the present difficulties, and the pro- tacular and modest, and other may
cess of being held up would and could I usurp the spotlight, but it is the steady
be made a pleasure if the state would i plodding down the path of human
only train bandits. It is essentially a achievement, in the musty laboratory,
state responsibility, however, and that spells ultimate-progress for man-
there is no more fitting place to locate kind and the advance of humanity.
a school than right here at Michigan,
where we already teach many courses
suited to no other profession. E
There is no use to attempt to abol- Editorial Comment
ish banditry. It has been in existence
for thousands of years and the attempt
to change anything or institution (hiaoEb e)
founded so firmly would 'involve seri- It NOVEMBER SESSION
ous hardships. We ought tohowever It is to be hoped the President
raise the general level of intelligence willconsider the suggestion of Sena-
of the profession to a peer with Jesse for Smoot for a special session in No-
Janes, and it is the great constructive vember. The President wisely re-
thinkers such as Reverend Adair whoI fused to call Congress for a partisan
account for the really consequently manhandling of flood relief and the
advances which mankind makes. manufacture of party hoakum dur-
ding the summer, but the coming ses-
SOTTTH AMERICAN PATRIOTISM sion will have at lease two or three

t
t
t
r
t

Travel Coats

Tweed with Fur Collars
Fall Shades--Tan, Black
and Whete. Some with
Fabric Collars
$69.50
All the beauty of autumn with its rich colors
adds to the joy of motoring, even though the
(lays are cooler. But why not be comfortable
as you travel-wear one of the new fall coats
-so smart, in the shades of autumn. The fur
collar adds that touch of comfort and sophis-
tication, which all clever women seek and
find at

/X44
1b1bI1'
©1

History has demonstrated that the
propinquity .of the American people to
those of South America makes it im-
possible for the United States to re-
main aloof by entering into few and
unimportant relations with them. The
present Nicaraguan and Mexican situ-I
ation are only typical of others we
have had in previous years.
Since relationships are unavoidable,
it is also impossible for the American
people to avoid forming an attitude of
mind toward the South American
which may either be fraught with
danger by being inimical or may be

tasks which are likely to involve pro-
longed debate and parilamentary
maneuvering. We hope, but are not
very sanguine, that flood relief and
the information and initiation of a
sound and comprehensive flood con-
trol program can be kept free from
party or sectional tactics. If it is
there should not be too much delay in
reaching the necessary legislation.
Tax revision, desirable as it is will
certainly be entangled in party and
factional wrangling and a great deal
of time will be spent in getting a
sound revision through the rapids,

222 S. Main

Phone

__ i

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