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July 30, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-30

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TODAY'S EVENTS
ALL DAY-Health Institute.
Put-In-Bay Excursion.
S:1 - "iledda Gabler" at
Sarah Caswell Angell Hlall

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
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VOL. VIII, No. 30.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ANN ARBOR MAN ELIMINATES DAVE WARD
AND BREAK(SASUTEN COURSE RECORD
IN THIRD ROUNDOF STATE TOURNAMENT
MALLOY TO MEET HEWITT IN FINALS
TOMORROW; LIVELY GOES DOWN
BEFORE KALAMAZOO STAR
(By Associated Press)
WASHITENAW COUNTRY CLUB, YPSILANTI, July 29.-
Johnnie Malloy beat Dave WVGard 2 and 1 this afternoon in the semi-i-nals,
to enter the finals tomorrow with Bud Hewitt as his opponent.
IHewitt beat Lively this afternoon, for a chance for the Michigan
-Amateur golf championship.1
Thirty six holes will be played tomorrow by Malloy and Hewitt, with

CONTRACT LET ON
NEW $75,00 ORGAN;
Contract for a new pipe organ cost-
ing $75,000 to be installed in Hill
auditorium has been let by the Board
of Reg~ents according to report. The
organ will be built by the Skinner,
Organ Co., of Boston, Mass., who will
start work immediately with inten-
tions to have the organ ready for usej
February 1, 1928.
This instrument will replace the
Frieze MemoriaT organ, now installed
in the auditorium. This present or-
gan was one of the first large organs
to be operated by electricity and was
exhibited at the World's Fair in Chi-
cago in 1893. It was later presented

TRE Against Tiger
TO BE INVESTI6ATED '
BY FEDERAL BOARD
GENERAL MOTORS, E. 1. UPONT a
COMPANY, ANDI U. S. STEEL
IiIDILI'I)C;
MVERS STARTS MOVEMENT!
This IEnquiry Promises To Be Most
IExtensiie Since Ilivestigation of
"Big Five" Meat Packers

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play in both the morning and aftern
The two finalists will tee off at 10
o'clock.
Ward and Malloy teed off at 2:30
o'clock with a gallery of nearly 400
people in their wake.
Both players got long drives, good
for 250 yards but on their second
shots each was in the rough on op-
posite sides of the green. Ward's
pitch to the green put his ball three
feet from the pin and he sunk it
for a birdie 4. Malloy took a five./
Malloy outdrove Ward from the
second tee but both were on in two
and holed out to halve it at four
apiece.
Ward Sinks Long Put
The third was a spectacular hole.
Ward drove the green but landed 40
feet from the pin. Then Malloy drove
to within, 15 feet of the cup. Ward
brought down the gallery when he
holed his 40 foot putt but Malloy
proved equal to the pinch and re-
ceived redoubled applause hy holing
out his 15 foot putt.
Ward won the fourth hole with an-
other birdie while Malloy got a par
five.
They halved the fifth with par
three and then Ward increased his
lead to three up by taking the sixth
hole four to five, The seventh was
halved with par fours.
On the eighth and ninth Johnnie
took back two of his holes, winning
the eighth with a par four and the
ninth with a, birdie three. He sunk
a 25 foot putt to take the ninth.
On the turn Ward was one up on
Malloy with three birdies and one
over par while Malloy had two bir-
dies and one over par.
Card for the first nine
Ward 4 4 2 4 3 4 4 5 4-34
Malloy 542535443-35
Ward got into the rough on his
second shot at the tenth but pitched
close to the pin. They halved the
hole with par fours.
Ward Stymes
In the second nine Malloy won the
15th hole to make it 2 up. They
halved the 16th and on the 17th Mal-
lo's approach was dead to the pin,
two feed away. Ward stymied him
but Malloy played safe and halved
the hole to win the match.
Malloy 43534444-31
Ward 4 4 6 3 4 5 4 4-34
Johnnie Malloy proved too much
this morning for Johnnie 'Bergelin,
taking the latter into camp 6 and 4
and putting himself in the semi-finals
for the championship.
The Cards were:
Malloy 543444444-36
Bergelin 5 4 4 5 3 4 4 5 4-38
Malloy 44534** * *
Bergelin 4 5 6 4 5****
Dave Ward won from Hugh Smith
this morning, 5 and 3, thus placing
Malloy and Ward in the semi-final I
play-off this afternoon. Ward was
shooting in championship form again
this morning, being one under par
whendthe match ended at the fifteenth
hole.
Hewitt Defeats Lee
Bud Hewitt remained in competi-
tion this morning by defeating H. B.
Lee 2 and 1. Hewitt's accuracy in
approaching gave him the edge over
Lee but the match was a close affair
until Hewitt, one up on the sixteenth
hole, nosed out Lee on the seven-
teenth.
Lively won the right to enter the
afternoon play by taking a close
match from his 17-year-old opponent,
Burt Shurley. The match was
square most of the way and it was

only on the last four holes that Live-
ly won two and ended the match 2 up
at the eighteenth hole.

oon.
!DR1 NOVY SPEAKS ON
WORK OFSCIENTIST
Outsiide Delegates Visit Ann Arbor
For Fifth Health Insfltute
of Series
DIABETES LECTURE TODAY
Prof. Frederick G. Novy, of the Bac-
teriology department, featured the
first day of the fifth health institute
held in the auditorium of the Dental
building. Prof. Novy's lecture, "The
Life and Works of Louis Pasteur,"
dealt with the triumphs of the found-
er of the modern science of bacteriol-
ogy. Pasteur is especially noted for
his discoveries of rabies immunization
and anthrax control.
Mrs. Dorothy Waller's lecture, "Pub-
lic Health Aspects of Diabetes," at 9
o'clock heads today's program. Mrs.
Waller is a dietitian at the University
hosiptal. She has written a section
on diet in a recent publication on
diabetes therapeutics.
Others on today's program are Miss
Mabel Bragg, who lectures on "Health
Education"; Miss Marjorie Delavan,
"Public Health Publicity"; Dr. Henry
F. Vaughan, of the Detroit Health
commission ,speaks on "Public Health
Administration."
Professor Novy and Newell Edson
continue on their, subjects of yester-
day's lectures, which were "Louis
Pasteur" and "Social Hygiene," re-
spectively.
About 50 members are in attendance
at this wek's sessions of the health
institute. Most of these delegates are
from the larger cities and towns of
Michigan and Ohio which maintain
municipal health departments.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
American League
Detroit, 4; Washington, 5. (11 inn-
ings.)
Cleveland, 6; New York, 4.
Chicago, 6; Philadelphia, 4.
St. Louis, 2; Boston, 8.
National League
Philadelphia, 3; St. Louis, 6.
Boston-Cincinnati, rain.
Brooklyn, 3; Pittsburgh, 4.
New York, 4; Chicago, 5.
DANCING CLASS TO
PRESENTPAGEANT
"The Wishing Ring" is the. subject
of the pageant to be presented by
the class in Natural Dancing, at 4
o'clock, Wednesday, August 10, in
Barbour gymnasium. The story weaves
itself around children who find a
fairy ring which will give them any-
thing they wish for. They wish for
the queen of the fairies, andwshe ap-
pears, bringing her band of follow-
ers to dance for the children. After
entertaining them with a number of
dances the fairies urge the children
to join their band and go with them
to fairy land. They hesitate for
awhile but are finally drawn away
and go with the fairy band.
The pageant will include large and
small group dances, and some scarf
work. All interested are invited to
attend.
ROME.-Mont Blanc, highest peak
of the Alks, is to be renamed Mont

Benito Mussolini in honor of the Fas-
cist premier.

to the University by the University (By Associated Press) I
Music Society and was in University 'Washington, July 29.-A sweeping ; ,
hall until 1913 when it was moved to inquiry into the relationship between
its present location. Parts of this old
instrument will be used in the new the E. L)uPont company, the Gen-
eral Motors corporation, and the it
__United States Steel corporation was ~r( c
GERMAN CRITICS BRAND ordered today by the Federal trade Although' reported able to sit up
OFFER AS "NUISANCE" commission. following an illness from acute bron-
The investigation will be conducted chitis, doctors for Georges Clemen-
(By Associated Press) by the chief economist who will go ceau, wartime premier and the "Tiger
BERLIN, July 29.-The offer by directly to the question the probable of France," said they regarded his
an American concern of a prize of economic consequences of the com- age, 86, as a factor against his recov-
$10,000 for completing Schubert's Un- munity of interest among the three cry. Clemenceau is shown above in
finished Symphony does not meet largest industrial corporations in the a late pose.
with favor among the German critics. United States. Upon the report of -___________
Paul Zschodlich of the "Deutsche the economist will depend future ac- WOAEN ENTER TAIN
Zeitung," one of the best known musi- tion by the commission. A T TWO PARTIES
cal writers in Germany, brands the The move of the commission, which
offer as "a nuisance" and as a "busi- came wholly unexpectedly, was upon The "Women's League held its re-
ness trick-a typical American go- motion of Com. A. F. Myers, the new- ception for the summer session stu-
getter "stunt." est member of the trade regulatory dents last night at 9:30 in Barbour
"To finish Schubert's B-minor sym- body. In his resolution directing an! gymnasium. Dean Edward H. Kraus,
phony we need-a Schubert," Zschor- inquiry, the message called atten- of the Summer session, and Mrs.
lich comments. "But he no longer tion to the fact published financial Kraus, and Professor Thomas E.
lives among us, and even the Ameri- reports of the Dupont companies Rankin and Mrs. Rankin were the
can magic wand won't discover him. showed that it had a large investment patrons.
Under the most favorable conditions in stock of the General Motors cor- The Rockford Players were also
there will be an imitation of Schu- poration. present after the performance.
bert's style. But it will differ from The resolution also cited that it had Tel Cross's orchestra played for
the real Schubert as false diamonds been currently reported in the press the dancing. Other guests found
differ from genuine." I(that the Dupont concern recently had ai J more entertaining diversion.
The critic of the "Taegliche Runds- acquired large holdings in the capital; At the same time, members of Hel-
chau" finds that $10,)0 is a sum stock of the steel corporation with the en Newberry and Betsy Barbour dor-
which, "had Schubert had but a littil expectatIon of havin; a nuimiber of mitories were giving a dance in the
part of it, would have saved him from directors in that organization as it latter hL use. There were 100 persons
many an embarrassment. We fear, now has in the General Motors. in attendance.
however, that even if this sum were Establishment of a community of Bouquts of gladiolas and pink
to be increased tenfold, it would n'- ilfe 1,est o",mong these three corpora 111les, to match, were the decora-
call to life a new Schubert." tions was declared to be both a mat- it ;.
ter of public concern. The commis- The committee in charge w'ere the
HARRISBURG, Pa.-Pittsburgh and sion then calls attention to its author- Misses Lucy Eliot, Nell Royder, and
Cleveland have been selected as the "tyby law to inauire into the organ- Alice Calles,, of Helen Newberry resi-
sites for the two colleges to be e t- ization, business, conduct, practices dence, and Kathleen Hamni, Mildred
ed within the next two years or So- and management of cporations gen- Harris, and Lydia Kahn, of Betsy
vak-American youths. erally. arbour house.
WALES TO GREET UNITED STATES OFFICIALS
FROM NIAGARA INTERNATIONAL PEACE BRIDGE
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OUTCOME 0OF GENEVA
CONFERENCE RESTS,
IN AMERICAN HANDS
(rIBSON STATES 11S BELIEF THAT
BRITISH PLAN WILL BE
UNACEPTABLE
COOLIDGE STILL HOPEFUL
Japanese ousider Issue Too Deleate
To Intervene In Favor of
Either Side
(y Associated Press)
GENEVA, July 29-What will
Washington do? That was the ques-
tion everybody seemed to be asking
tonight in British, Japanese, and
otbhar non-American circles of the
Tri-partite Nava lconference.
Hugh Gibson, chief American dele-
gate, told the British and Japanese
plenipotentiaries yesterday he was
convinced that the latest British plan
was entirely unacceptable. He added,
however, that he would transmit the
text to Washington.
Japanese Deny Report
The Japanese delegation authoried
the Associated Press tonight to deny
the report which had been circulating
abroad that the Japanese will medi-
ate officially between Great Britain
and the United States, The spokes-
man for Admiral Saito said tha the
Japanese deemed the issue between
the British and American . delegates
as too delicate in nature to justify
intervention, because the issue wa
one of principle and not of technical-
ity.
Japanese spokesmen added that if
the difficulties betwen the British and
the Americans was one. concerning
the tot4 tonnage or the number of
warrhips in a particular class, the
Japanese might seen their way to
offer their services to mediate with
some reasonable hope of success. He
could not see the way clear for medi-
ation, however, when their is a prob-
lem of principle due to the American
opposition to the six-inch gun cruiser
and to America's desire to maintain
freedom concerning the consumption
of their secondary cruisers.
.Japanese Pessimistic
The Japanese continued pessimistic
concerning the outcome of the con-
ference. They seemed particularly
desirous that if the conference ad-
journs without achieving its purpose,
this should be done without anything
being publicly said at the final session
that might provoke friction or lead
to misunderstanding between the
powers involved.
RAPID CITY, S. D., July 29.-Pro-
posals of Great Britain at the troubled
Geneva conference called for a larger
navy than President Coolidge will
sanction.
That is the main obstacle in the
conference in the opinion of the Pres-
ident, who will not agree to a program
calling for construction of a greater
nmvy when h.e had hoped to bring
about an understanding for reduction
of armament.
So hopeful that further discussion
may bring about modification in the
Briish proposal, Mr. Coolidge is
plainly determined not to accept the
terms now presented by that country.
It was recalled today at the execu-
tive office that the President invited
it ri BrItain and Japan into confer-

once for the purpose of eventually
bringing about a reduction in the size
of the navies of the nations involved
and a consequent decrease in ex-
penses.
YPSILANTI, Mich ,--Two hundred
eighty students will receive degrees
amnd diplonmas from the Michigan State
N rormal College at the close of the
summer term.
urO~ethr ar

The Prince of Wales and his pa rty will pay their official visit to the United States on August 7, when
they motor from Niagara Falls, Cana da, to the new international Peace B ridge spanning the Niagara River at
Niagara Falls. Accompanying the P rince on his Canadian trip are Prince George, his younger broth. r, and
Premier Boldwin. The royal visitors will be met at the bridge by Vice P Premier Baldwin. The royal visitors
State Kellogg. Photos are, center, a panoramic view of Niagara Falls, low er left, the Peace Bridge. Top, left
to right, Prince George, the Prince of Wales and Prime Minister B Idwin. Lower right, Vice President Dawes
and Secretary Kellogg.

OALL
GAME
TO
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-Predicts more warmth With pos-
sible showers.

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