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November 03, 1995 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-03

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 3, 1995
Denied promotion, U. of Vt prof
files reVerse discrii nation suit

The Minnesota Daily
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - A white
University of Minnesota professor who
claims she was bypassed for a job at the
University of Vermont in favor of a
minority candidate is seeking help from
the U.S. Equal Employment Opportu-
nity Commission.
Economics Prof. Beth Honadle has
filedareverse-discrimination complaint
with the University of Vermont and the
Vermont attorney general's office.
The commission served charges on
behalf of Honadle against the Univer-
sity of Vermont in mid-October.
Honadle alleges that she was over-
looked in favor of a less-qualified can-
didate for the position of head of the
school's community development and
applied economics department.
"The president (of the University of

Vermont) can overturn the earlier deci-
sion," said Honadle, who has taught
applied economics at the University of
Minnesota since 1990.
Honadle said she is expecting a re-
sponse from University of Vermont
President Thomas Salmon.
But University of Vermont officials
aren't saying anything about the spe-
cific issues raised in Honadle's com-
plaint.
"The case is still pending before the
EEOC," said the school's news and
information director, Enrique
Corredera. Corredera said school offi-
cials deny that Honadle was treated
unfairly.
At the University of Vermont, de-
partments that hire minorities receive
additional money from a special fund.
Honadle said she thinks the additional

money is used as an incentive to en-
courage minority recruitment.
The university gives half the amount
of a newly hired faculty member's sal-
ary for five years to departments that
hire a minority, Corredera said.
The University of Minnesota has a
different policy to encourage minority
recruitment.
Florence Funk, assistant to the senior
vice president, said the University of
Minnesota has some funds that can be
used by departments to temporarily sup-
port the newly hired minority faculty
member. But eventually departments
have to use their own funds to support
minority hires, Funk said.
Honadle said her discrimination com-
plaint is not against affirmative action
policies. She said she is protesting the
way the department head was selected.

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The Vermont school conducted an open
and competitive search but didn't
choose the best candidate, Honadle
claims.
Honadle said she was the search
committee's preferred choice. A num-
ber of instructors, including a member
of the search committee, told her she
had superior credentials, Honadle said.
But the chairman of the search com-
mittee, Al Gilbert, who is an associate
professor in resource economics, said
the committee didn't rank the candi-
dates. The committee interviewed four
candidates and selected three finalists,
Gilbert said. He said the dean made the
final decision.
Although the University of
Vermont's Office of Affirmative Ac-
tion, Equal Opportunity and Diversity
Programs rejected Honadle's complaint,
the attorney general's office saw a legal
basis to initiate discrimination charges,
said Seth Steinzor, an assistant attorney
general for civil rights.
But the attorney general's office
didn't evaluate the strength ofHonadle's
charges, Steinzor said. Honadle's case
was forwarded to the EEOC's Boston
office.The attorney general's office has
an agreement with the EEOC to prevent
duplication of efforts, Steinzor said.
But the director of the Boston EEOC,
Bob Sanders, refused to talk about the
Honadle case.
Sanders said that, in general, if the
plaintiffs charge is upheld, the EEOC
will try to negotiate a settlement. In
extreme cases, the issue may be taken to
court, he said.
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Cancer gene may cause other tumors
WASHINGTON -- The gene responsible for hereditary breast cancer might
also play a role in the noninherited tumors that are far more common - by
somehow getting lost inside cells, new research suggests.
The gene BRCA1 is thought to suppress cancerous growth when it works
properly. Women who inherit a mutated version are at increased risk of getting the
hereditary form of breast cancer. -
No one has ever found mutated BRCA I in noninherited breast tumors, indicat-
ing it might not be important for most women. But now University of Texas
researchers have made the surprise finding that otherwise normal BRCA1 seems
to get lost in some women with noninherited breast cancer.
The discovery, reported in today's journal Science, "means a mechanism we're
already learning about may be much more broadly important than our initial
thought that it would affect just a small group of families at high risk," said Dr.
William Wood of Emory University.
The finding might also eventually help doctors tell how far cancer has spread before
it appears malignant under the microscope, so they can better treat women, he said.
Between 5 percent and 10 percent of the 182,000 breast cancer cases diagnosed
each year are genetic. BRCA 1 is responsible for half of these inherited tumors, as
well as some hereditary ovarian cancer. Scientists also have found that in some
women, normal BRCA1 can mutate to cause noninherited ovarian tumors.

House rejects plan to
cut back EPA's power
WASHINGTON - Rejecting efforts
by its own Republican leaders to relax
environmental regulations, the House
of Representatives yesterday abandoned
a controversial plan to sharply restrict
the power of the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency.
Three times in barely three months,
the House has tackled a series of 17
legislative proposals, or "riders,"
authored by conservative Republicans
to restrict the environmental agency's
authority to enforce some of its most
stringent limits on air and water pollu-
tion. The House voted in August to kill
the riders, reversed itself on a second
vote four days later, and then, yester-
day, reversed itself yet again.
The latest tally was 227-194, and
reflected the sharp divisions within
Congress when environmental regula-
tions come up against the anti-regula-
tory fervor at the heart of this year's
Republican legislative agenda.
The turnabout means that for at least
another year, the EPA, despite sharp

cuts in its funding, will be allowed to
carry out regulations limiting hazard-
ous emissions from sewage plants,oi-
refineries and other industrial sites.
Powell investment
stirs potential debate
WASHINGTON - As potential ri
vals begin to size up Colin Powell's
possible vulnerabilities as a presiden-
tial candidate, an item topping their
lists is the then-general's investment a
decade ago in a Buffalo, N.Y., televi-
sion station.
Powell's possible adversaries do not
suggest any impropriety on his part.
And an examination of the deal does
not indicate that Powell's profits -
roughly 7 percent per year over a de-
cade - were out of the ordinary, al-
though he has declined to release the
sort of detailed information that would
allow a full picture of his finances.
Nonetheless, the investment, and the
help Powell received from a wealthy
benefactor, does have aspects that con-
trast with the up-from-the-bootstraps
themes of Powell's autobiography.

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rAROUND THE WORLD
French police foil S. Kore
terrorist bombing slush f
PARIS - In their first major break- SEOUL,
through in the terrorist wave gripping tors were pe
France, police said yesterday they had investigation
foiled abombing planned for this week- ness people
end and arrested several people, includ- million presi
ing an Algerian man overheard giving groups and+
orders to plant the device. manded the
Jean-Louis Debre, the French inte- Roh Tae.
rior minister, hailed the arrests as "a Ahn Kang
new, decisive step ... toward neutraliz- investigation
ing this group of terrorists." But, he Prosecutor's
added, "The threat remains. More at- more than I
tacks can still occur." pected ofgiv
Police raided homes in Paris, Lille was in offic
and Lyon on Wednesday night and yes- Among th
terday, seizing guns, grenades and com- were about
puters as well as a homemade bomb conglomera
apparently intended to be detonated, gave more tf
perhaps in a car, at an open-air Sunday whose busir
market in Lille, in northern France. contracts du
Debre identified one of the 10 suspects ministration
in custody as "a central figure" in a Ahn, desc
three-city terrorist network. tion of Roh
The announcement was sure to give a day as unsati,
boost to French efforts to end the car- ecutors wou
nage. The French government, which interrogating
has stationed tens of thousands of also said pro
heavily armed soldiers around Paris, location of
has been increasingly frustrated by its $242 millior
inability to make important arrests orto from his slug
prevent the attacks that have killed 7
and injured more than 170 since July. -

an presidentia
md criticized
South Korea - Prosecu-
oised yesterday to launch
s of South Korean busi-
who contributed to a $653
dential slush fund, as civic
one opposition party de-
arrest of former President
Min, chief of the central
department ofthe Supreme
Office, said some of the
100 business people sus-
ing money to Roh while he
e would be summoned..
em, other prosecutors said,
a dozen heads of giant
tes who reportedly each
han $13 million to Roh, or
nesses were awarded big
uring Roh's 1988-93 ad-
ribing a 16-hour interroga-
on Wednesday and-yester-.
sfactory, declared that pros-
id summon Roh again after
g the business people. He
secutors had confirmed the
all but $49 million of the
n Roh admits to having left
sh fund.
From Daily wire services

II

li wrt' l

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