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October 30, 1995 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-10-30

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 30, 1995

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Islamic leader's death may lead to violence

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) -
Palestinians burned American and Is-
x-aeli flags yesterday and swore revenge
for the assassination of Dr. Fathi
$hakaki, the leader of the radical Is-
lamic Jihad and a top architect of terror
attacks against Israel.
Students at the Islamic University
in Gaza City demanded retaliation
against Israel's Mossad intelligence
agency, which Israeli media and Pal-
£stinian sources said carried out the
killing.
"We assure the assassins of the Zion-
ist entity ... that this ugly crime will
make every Zionist on the face of the
earth a target for our painful strike,"
saida leaflet distributed by Islamic Jihad
in the Gaza Strip.
Islamic Jihad and the Maltese police
confirmed yesterday that Shakaki was
gunned down in Malta on Thursday. A

w

gunman on a motorbike, using a si-
lenced pistol, shot him five times in the
head outside a hotel in Valetta, Malta's
capital.
The assassination threatened to re-
new the cycle of violencejust as Israel's
peace agreement with the Palestinians
reaches fruition. But the removal of
Shakaki also buys time to let the agree-
ment work.
Islamic Jihad, an Iranian-backed or-
ganization with an estimated 500 to 600
activists in Lebanon and Gaza, is a
highly centralized group expected to be
hard hit by the assassination.
"Every action was under the control of
Shakaki, who was the commander, the
trainer and also the man who raisedmoney
for the organization, mostly in Iran," said
Gideon Ezra,aformertopofficial in Israel's
Shin Bet security service.
A Palestinian source said Islamic

Jihad is split between members who
want to reach a compromise with
Yasser Arafat's self-rule government
and radicals such as Shakaki who re-
ject anything short of a Palestinian
state in all of Israel and the occupied
territories.
The source, speaking on condition
of anonymity, said Shakaki was the
only leader who could hold the two
sides together."
Alex Fishman, military correspon-
dent for Israel's Yedioth Ahronoth
newspaper, said Shakaki's assassina-
tion was likely to lead to violence. But
in the short-term, he said, Islamic Jihad
would "fall into chaos. The brain is
gone."
Israeli officials, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity, said they hoped the
disarray lasts long enough to get them
past Palestinian elections, tentatively
set for January, and perhaps even the
Israeli elections set for November 1996,
without a terror attack that could scuttle

the peace process.
Islamic Jihad-"jihad" means "holy
war" in Arabic - opposes the Israel-
PLO peace agreements and has claimed
responsibility for attacks that have killed
dozens of Israelis in the two years since
the first accord was signed.
Arafat, in Amman, Jordan, for an
economic conference, refused to com-
ment yesterday on the killing.
But ministers in his Palestinian Au-
thority condemned the assassination
and urged Islamic Jihad not to retali-
ate.
Asked yesterday whether Israel was
involved in Shakaki's killing, Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, attending the
economic conference in Amman, said,
"Not that I know of."
But he added: "The Islamic Jihad is a
murderous organization and he headed
it. He was someone who killed and was
proud of it, and whoever deals in mur-
der is taking the risk of being mur-
dered."

SNATOA.. REPORT
Report: $1.3M FDA computer broken
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration has spent $13 million
trying to protect Americans from tainted foods and medicines imported by foreign
companies-but the new computer program doesn't work, a government report says.
And the FDA doesn't know how to fix the huge computer system that was
supposed to improve inspections of imports nationwide, says a General Account-
ing Office report obtained by The Associated Press.
The FDA says it already is fixing the flaws, and expects the program soon to
improve how the agency inspects more than $10 billion in imports every year.
It will take an additional $8 million to have the computer system running
nationally by 2001, the FDA estimates.
Currently, FDA agents ensure the products are legal, then perform spot checks
for everything from bug infestations to the safety of drug ingredients. Problems
often are found by chance.
OASIS, the Operational and Administrative System for Import Support, is
intended to automate import inspections. A computerized manifest would let the
FDA clear low-risk shipments quickly and cut costly paperwork, but raise red flags
for high-risk items or unusual imports. And it would prevent port shopping, where
a shipment ousted from one port tries to slip through another, by listing nationwide
all products rejected at each site.

ARE YOU ANXIOUS OR
DEPRESSED AT SCHOOL?
Professional help is available.
Call Counseling Referral Network for a
private, affordable, and confidential consultation.
665-8528

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Subway fire kills 300,
injures hundreds
BAKU, Azerbaijan -Rescue work-
ers recovered about 300 bodies yester-
day from the wreckage ofa subway that
caught fire in the capital, trapping hun-
dreds of terrified passengers. At least
200 others were injured.
Officials in Azerbaijan declared two
days of mourning for the dead, blaming
the tragedy, the world's worst subway
accident, on the system's "outdated
Soviet"equipment.
Unable to escape from the packed
cars, most of the people who died were
killed by carbon monoxide poisoning
from burning toxic materials in the train
carriages, officials said.
"As soon as the train entered the
tunnel I saw a flash," said Tabil
Guseinov, apassenger. "Then the flames
enveloped the train car, there was a
sound of breaking glass, and the lights
went out."
The fire broke out between two sub-
way stations in central Baku on Saturday
afternoon because ofa malfunction of the
train's electrical system, officials said.
Rescuers battled the blaze until early
yesterday, then pulled the injured and
the dead from the tunnel. Police and
security forces barred journalists from
the area.
President Geidar Aliev set up a gov-

ernment commission to investigate. Its
head, Deputy Prime Minister Abbas
Abbasov, promptly blamedthe acci-
dent on Baku's "outdated Soviet" sub-
ways, which needed urgent repairs, the
Turan news agency reported.
Storm hits central
Philippines, kills 68
BACOLOD, Philippines-Tropical
storm Zack whipped through the Phil-
ippines over the weekend, killing at
least 68 people and leaving thousands
homeless before heading into the South
China Sea yesterday.
With peak winds of65 mph, the storm
destroyed hundreds of houses and m-a-
jor roads, knocked out power lines in
many areas, and sank a ship and several
boats.
Zack struck hardest on the islands of
Negros and Panay.
The death toll was raised to 68 yes-
terday when three bodies were found in
Bacolod, 380 miles south of Manila.
Several people were still missing, most
of them shanty dwellers whose homes
were swept away by swollen rivers.
Officials said a motorized outrigger
canoe capsized off Bacolod, on Negros,
at the height of the storm Saturday
night, but rescuers later found its six
passengers.
- From Daily wire services

Pentagon plans to
expand espionage
WASHINGTON - The Defense
Department has merged the covert in-
telligence operations of the individual
military services and plans to expand
its espionage abroad, starting with es-
tablishment of phony businesses over-
seas as cover, according to administra-
tion and congressional sources.
The Pentagon's new interest in spying
is partly the result of pressure from Con-
gress on both the military and the civil-
ian-run Central Intelligence Agency to
send more clandestine agents overseas
to work on such targets as terrorism and
weapons proliferation that cannot be
well-covered by high-tech spy satellites.
The pumping of new life into the
military's spying comes as the CIA's
Directorate of Operations, which re-
mains the principal agency responsible
for sending agents to recruit and handle
informants abroad, is under fire both
inside the agency and on Capitol Hill
for questionable activities by its own
clandestine operatives abroad and for
the failure to detect a Soviet mole within
the agency before he caused incalcu-

p YI WORL

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lable damage to CIA spy networks in
the Soviet Union.
The Pentagon plans, however, Have
raised questions inside the administra-
tion and among some members of Con-
gress about how many covert opera-
tives from how many agencies the
United States needs in the post-Cold
War world.
Sitcom execpushed
Clinton heal care
WASHINGTON - Harry
Thomason, whose credits include "De-
signing Women" and designing Clinton
as "The Man from Hope," and actress
Markie Post spent two days in April
1993 meeting intensively with senior
White House staffers, according- to
White House internal memos newly
released in the congressional investiga-
tion of the White House travel office.
Clinton aide Reta Lewis suggested
the entertainers discuss these "talking
points" with the administration's health
care group members: "plan for the in-
troduction of the plan; plan for the cam-
paign to build support for the plan; and
health care video - status, message,
production issues."

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