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October 16, 1995 - Image 13

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-10-16

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Ryan White
White On Target
6oda~ster

LUfr was,
oa /z

oWe

urteen years ago-tomorrow,
an era in Michigan football
history ended - and it had
nothing to do with the team on the
field.,
On Oct. 17, 1981, legendary radio
voice Bob Ufer broadcast his final
Michigan football game.
.Nine days after that Michigan
St'di im contest between the Wolver-
iuiedand Iowa, Ufer lost his three-
yef' battle with colon cancer.
There will be quite a few people
reading this today who don't know
who Ufer was, and that's too bad. If
y're a Michigan football fan, you
shiu'd know.
In the Wolverines' storied past,
Ufer isn't a chapter; he's an entire
volume.
Ufer was the greatest voice in the
116-year history of Michigan a
flotball. No one who ever heard the
man would argue that.
Before he missed the first game of
the 1981 season, Ufer had brought
362 straight games into homes all
over the Midwest via the WJR
airwaves.
And he did it his way.
All the rules of play-by-play were
tossed out the window of Ufer's
broadcast booth.
His calls were emotional, spirited
and colorful.
*Ufer didn't just cover the Wolver-
ines; he loved them.
He was a Michigan fan who didn't
worry about showing it. Ufer was a
homer in every sense of the word, but
noone ever seemed to care.
He was such a personality that even
fans at other schools respected him.
In his final trip to East Lansing in
1981, Spartan fans gave Ufer a
standing ovation.
"His spirit and love for Michigan
were genuine," said current Michigan
coach Lloyd Carr, who remembers
listening to Ufer back when he was a
high school coach. "His charisma and
spirit were things you don't see
often."
The Wolverines have always taken
pride in hiring "Michigan men"
within the football program, and
that's what they had in Ufer.
He graduated from Michigan in
1943. While he was a Wolverine, he
established himself as one of the
school's greatest track and field
athletes.
In 1940, Ufer's first year, he set
eight freshman records. At a Big Ten
meet in Chicago in 1942, he set the
world indoor record in the 440
(:48.1).
Still, he is most famous for his
work as a broadcaster.
For the 37 years he broadcast, the
Wolverines were known across the
airwaves as "Meechigan." The
stadium was dramatically referred to
as "the hole that Yost dug, Crisler
paid for, Canham carpeted and
Schembechler fills every Saturday in
the fall."
And Bo Schembechler, with his
affinity for keeping the attack on the
ground, received the moniker
"General George Patton"
Sciembechler.
Ufer screamed, yelled and consis-
tently lost his voice during games.
He got twice as worked up as Dick
Vitale ever has.
lfer even had a horn, called the
"George Patton" Schembechler
scoring horn, that he would honk after
every Michigan touchdown and field
goal.
But it is impossible to fully
describe Ufer's style in words. You

hadto have heard him.
Saturday, an off day for this
season's Wolverines, WJR replayed
Ufer's broadcast of the 1976 Michi-
gan-Michigan State game.
A all -C- fIi-A y,_ T Mer is stil

V LEYBALL
Continued from Page 1B
lead and never looked back.
"Tohearthem screaming gives you the
extra oomph to win," senior Shannon
Brownlee said. "Notjust for yourself, but
for the team as a whole."
DuetothestrongattackingofBrownlee,
Shareen Luze and Sarah Jackson, Michi-
gan hardly felt the loss of Ruschiensky in
coasting to a 15-6 win in game one. Luze,
in particular, filled in admirably for
Ruschiensky, finishing with 17 kills for
the match.
"I just wanted to go in there and play
my game," Luze said. "I just tried to
swing away. There was a lot of competi-
tion to see who would go out and fill
(Kristen's) spot."
The second game had no real rhythm as
the Gophers and the Wolverines were
neck and neck throughout. However,
Michigan was able to capture the big
points in the end. At 14-14, the Wolver-
ines received an ace from Jeanine
Szczesniak. They then wrapped the game
up with a big kill by Brownlee.
Although Michigan stepping up in the
big points was the immediate factor for
the 16-14 win, the underlying causes for
the victory stemmed from the Wolver-
ines' improvedblockinganddigging play.
Suzy O'Donnell, Jackson and Brownlee
provided the biggest boosts for Michigan
with their blocking, while Linnea
Mendoza, Szczesniak and Brownlee all
dug well.
The Gophers jumped out to an early
lead in the third game behind the sloppy
play of Michigan on both the offensive
and defensive ends. Minnesota held com-
manding leads of 7-3 and 13-5 in the third
game.
Atthe 13-5junctureofthisgame,Michi-
gan coach Greg Giovanazzi utilized one
of his common strategies by making sub-
stitutions to change the look of his team.
He brought in Erin McGovern, Jane
Stevens, Linsey Ebert and Karen Chase
to give the team a needed spark.
"For the second time in a week, we
made substitutions to give the team a
rest," Giovanazzi said. "We changed the
tempo."
This strategy proved effective as the
combination of the great sideout and de-
fensive play of Michigan and the tenta-
tive play of Minnesota enabled the Wol-
verines to get back in the game.
Once Michigan was back in conten-

TONYA BOARD/Daily
Suzy O'Donnell (left) and Shareen Luze block a Wisconsin shot Saturday night.

tion, Giovanazzi returned the starters to
action. Behind the strong offensive ex-
ecution of Mendoza, Luze and Brownlee,
the Wolverines pulled the game out, 15-
13.
"Michigan played areally great match,"
Minnesota coach Pam Miller-Dombeck
said. "They didn't let anything hit the
floor."
Given the results of the match with the
Gophers, Michigan went into Saturday's
match against the Badgers with a lot of
confidence. This was evident in the first
game as Michigan won the big points
down the stretch to prevail, 18-16.
In the second game, Michigan struggled
on both the offensive and defensive ends.
The Wolverines failed to convert numer-
ous kills plus had difficulty handling the
powerful spikes of the Badger attack, in
particular those of Marisa Mackey and
Amy Lee. Mackey and Lee finished the
match with 26 and 23 kills, respectively.
The third game had the same flow as
the first two as both teams battled back
and forth. Brownlee played particularly
well, converting alot ofher spikes enroute
to a 30 kill effort for the match, setting a

The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, October 16, 1995 - 38
Defense provides lift
for Michiganspikers

new school record. In addition, both
Brownlee and O'Donnell blocked well in
this game. However, it wasn't enough as
the Badger attack proved too strong. Wis-
consin captured the game, 15-13.
While the fourth game began like the
previous three, this time Michigan took
the initiative at 9-9. Brownlee was un-
touchable in converting nearly all of
herkills as Michigan coasted to a 15-11
win.
The momentum stayed with the Wol-
verines in the fifth game. They made
adjustments to the Badger attack enabling
them to convert only five of 20 kill
attempts for the game. While Wisconsin
continued to look flustered, everything
clicked for Michigan on both the offen-
sive and defensive ends.
"We got tentative and Michigan played
really well in the fifth game," Wisconsin
coach John Cook said.
Mendoza consistently got the ball to
either Brownlee on the outside or
O'Donnell up the middle, while attaining
a school record 73 assists forthe match. In
the end, Michigan won 15-9 while play-
ing a relaxed, fundamental game.

By Andy Knudsen
Daily Sports Writer
The Wolverines are digging - and
blocking - out of the hole that left
them tied for ninth in the conference
last year.
For a team that does not put on point-
scoring clinics, the Michigan volley-
ball team has put its conference and
postseason hopes in the hands of its
defense.
This weekend.served as a positive
test for the Wolverines' 'D' as they
rolled over Minnesota, 15-6, 16-14, 15-
13, and outlasted Wisconsin, 18-16,
15-17, 13-15, 15-11, 15-9.
"It's been a trademark of ours. We
sideout well but have trouble scor-
ing," Michigan coach Greg
Giovanazzi said.
The points sporadically build up,
though, when the Wolverines success-
fully stifle their opponents.
While many coaches attribute
success or failure to their side of
the net, Minnesota's interim-coach
Pam Miller-Dombeck acknowl-
edged the "great defense" of the
Wolverines.
"They dug a lot of balls," she said.
Michigan averaged 21.75 digs per
game in its two matches this weekend,
much improved from its 15.9 dpg aver-
age last year.
"It was getting frustrating watching
them dig out shots," Minnesota outside
hitter Katrien DeDecker said.
The 6-foot-2 junior finished Friday's
match with 21 kills, but the rest of the
Golden Gophers couldn't gain enough
momentum to shake the Wolverines'
confidence.
Freshman Jeanine Szczesniak led
Michigan over the weekend with 37
digs, followed by senior Shannon
Brownlee (32) and sophomore setter
Linnea Mendoza (31).
"Our rovers did a really good job
of popping the ball up," Giovanazzi
said.
Michigan's work on blocking in prac-
tice last week also paid dividends in its
weekend homestand.
Last year, the Wolverines averaged

"It's been a
trademark of ours
We sideout well
but have trouble
scoring."
- Greg Glovanazzi
Michigan volleyball coach
1.6 team blocks per game and 2.8 block
assists per game.
Improvement from last year and
the beginning of this year was evi-
dent against the Gophers and Bad-
gers as Michigan averaged 2.7 team
blocks and 4.9 block assists per
game.
"Our blocking got a lot better at the E
end of the match (Saturday)," senior
Suzy O'Donnell said.
The Wolverines' defense kept them
in the grueling three hour match against
a Wisconsin team that Giovanazzi said
"handles the ball as well as any (team)
we've seen."
Sophomore middle blocker Sarah
Jackson led Michigan's improved
blocking with 12 block assists in the
two matches.
Brownlee totaled 10 block assists
and O'Donnell followed with 7 for the;
weekend.
For Brownlee, the key to good block-
ing is her position on the floor.
"I was just trying to line up in front of
the hitter," she said.
The Wolverines will need to con-
tinue their defensive prowess as they
play their next three games on the road
against the top three teams in the con-
ference.
O'Donnell said the team is playing
with a lot of confidence, which will'
help it battle the Big Ten's cream of the
crop: Penn State, Ohio State and Michi-
gan State.
"We're very happy with how we're
playing right now," she said. "It will
really help us going into these next
matches."

'M' harriers capture Michigan Intercollegiate Championships

By Nancy Berger
Daily Sports Writer
Being the best women's cross coun-
try team in the state is not enough for
Michigan. The Wolverines won't be
satisfied until they can become the
best cross country team in the Big Ten
for the-fourth straight year in a row.
The Michigan Intercollegiate
Championships in Ypsilanti proved
to be no more than a mere jog in the
Huron Golf Club for the 15th ranked
Wolverines.
Michigan ran away from the 23
team field, with 20 points. The Wol-
verines' closest competitor was in-
state rival Michigan State with 70
points. Western Michigan finished
third with 94 points.
All-American sophomore Pauline
Arnill led the Michigan squad of nine
harriers by capturing the Intercolle-
giate title in the time of 17:42. Her
closest challenger in the race was
Michigan State's Stephanie
Dueringer, whose finished in 18:08.
Freshman Katie McGregor was the
leader of the first pack of Michigan
harriers, finishing third with a time of
18:31. Katy Hollbacher and Jen Bar-
ber finished in fourth and fifth place
with times of 18:32 and 18:37, re-
spectively.
Arnill and this trio of top runners
have secured spots on the nine-person
team that will be competing at the Big
Ten championships. Michelle Slater

and Kelly Chard, who were both inac-
tive Friday, are the other two runners
that will join the squad in Minneapo-
lis in two weeks.
"I have to run better. I am not con-
tent with what I have been doing,"
Hollbacher said.
Hollbacher and her teammates re-
alize that winning another Big Ten
title will be an even bigger challenge
than last year because of injuries.
The most crushing setback to the
team is the nagging back injury to
senior Courtney Babcock. Whether
she will run or not in two weeks is still
in question.
One person who might be going to
the Big Ten's is Jen Stuht, who finished

seventh Friday with a time of 18:46.
"I was very happy with the way I
ran. It was one of my better times,"
said Stuht, who replaced Kelly Chard
at the meet this weekend.
Among the others that will be fight-
ing for a spot on the roster for Minne-
apolis are Mayrie Richards, Tiffin
Goodman, Eileen Fleck and-Heather
Grigg.
Fleck finished four seconds in front
of Richards Friday while Goodman
and Grigg placed 21st and 32nd, re-
spectively.
There are about 10 girls who are
running healthy that can contribute to
winning another championship.
Hollbacher said that the Badgers will

pose an even tougher challenge to the
Wolverines than last year, so depth will
be a key factor when competing against
Big Ten rival Wisconsin.
"Every team has a big gun, but the
most important runners are the 3-5
positions," Stuht said. "We need to
have the team come within 45 sec-
onds of Arnill." a
Closing that time gap was one of
the focuses that Coach McGuire had

stressed to the team before the meet
Friday. It is something that the team
will have to continue to work on as-
indicated by the results.
Michigan still has many unan-
swered questions but it will have two
weeks to fill in the blanks before the
big meet.
When the last blank is filled, the
Wolverines hope that it will say Big
Ten Champion.

ATTN: Ch. E's, M.E.'s:
A°rchenicaI Company
*LYONDELL IS A FORTUNE 200 COMPANY LOCATED IN
HOUSTON, TEXAS AND SURROUNDING AREAS
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AND OTHER PETROCHEMICALS AND OWNS A MAJORITY
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*LYONDELL WILL BE AT THE UofM SWE CAREER FAIR AND
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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT
BRIAN PRUEIT at LYONDELL, 713-452-8469 or
THE UofM PLACEMENT CENTER OR UofM CO-OP OFFICE.
LYONDELL IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER - M/F/D/V
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Be part of the 1996
MICHIGANENSIAN

Women's. cross
cou ntry results
Team finish Points
1. Michigan 20
2. Michigan State ,70
3,Western Michigan 94
4., Central Michigan ' 113.
5, Eastem Michigan 123
6. Hillsdale 124
7, Detroit-Mercy 165
8. Spring Arbor 255
9. Siena Heights 294
10. Macomb 320
11. Lake Superior 346 -
12.-Schoolcraft , 362
13. Grand Valley State 377
14. Aquinas 407
15. Northwood 437
16. Concordia 487
17, Delta 495

C

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