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October 06, 1995 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-10-06

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10 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 6, 1995

RECORDS
Continued from page 9
Jawbreaker
Dear You
DGC
Jawbreaker, the latest graduate of the
Gilman Street San Francisco punk club
joins Green Day and Rancid in the big
leagues with its major label debut "Dear
You."
The band's signing to DGC, the hir-
ing of Green Day's producer Rob
Cavallo, and the softening up of their
sound could easily be seen as a drastic
sell-out move, which in fact it is. But
"Dear You" is still a good record, and
captures the band in fine form; with
good production, good songs and a more
refined style, Jawbreaker has taken ad-
vantage of their major label status, go-
ing all the way to produce a strong
record.
Even though the record is more fo-
cused and a little less edgy than their
three previous releases, in no way has
Jawbreaker gone totally soft; maybe
more mature, but not soft. Their blend
of punk and hardcore with the famous
Gilman Street British accent throws
them in with more of the old school
U.K. punk crowd like the Buzzcocks
rather than to the mall punk of Green
Day.
With its fuzzy guitars and harsh
rhythms, "Dear You" captures some of
the hardest mainstream punk since the
grunge revolution. The opening anthem
"Save Your Generation" remains as
political and relavent as the band has
always been: "I have a present: it is the
present / You have to learn to find it
within you / If you can learn to love it /
you just might like it."
While tracks like "Chemistry" show

Jawbreaker in finest form, the band
explores a slower and more focused
side on others like "Jet Black" and
"Basilica." Chock full of good music
and intelligent songs, "Dear You" shows
who got the brains on Gilman.
- Brian A. Gnatt
Kepone
Skin
Quarterstick
This second album from Kepone,
frontedby former Gwarbassist Michael
Bishop, is a definite evolution from
their first album. While acceptable, the
first album was a bit pedestrian. "Skin,"
on the other hand, moves along at a
much improved pace. The songs seem
tighter and more palatable.
Depending on the song, Kepone is
reminiscent ofeveryone from Megadeth
to Alice in chains. Bishop's slit-chord
vocals have more of that Dave Mustaine
feel than is probably good for them, but
so it goes. Musically, Kepone finds
their niche in that dangerous area be-
tween speed metal and indie rock. "Blue
Devil" has certain timing elements that
resemble a Queensryche ballad, but at
the same time has discordant guitars
and nearly monotone vocals which keep
the band from actually sounding as if
they belonged to any given genre. And
songs like the instrumentals "Ed's Sad
Party," a drum heavy (almost marching
band so) journey into sound, and "Idiot
Ball Drop," a piano instigated mood
piece, prove the band's ability to go
their own way.
But Gwar fans should take note that
this is not the Beefcake the Mighty you
may remember. Gwar's singular en-
ergy and humor aren't really foundhere.
While still quite adept at their craft,
Kepone bears little relation to their Gwar

Tar no longer exists, but at least it looks like the members got to go to Italy.

roots. It's different
still pretty good.

from that, but it's

Ani DiFranco turns It up, on and out
Seven albums in six years from her own label, Righteous Babe Records, and she's
constantly on tour. Her short but potent set mesmerized the Hill at Folk Festival
in January. Last April, she single-handedly sold out back-to-back nights at the Ark.
Over the summer, she rocked out underneath the elements at other folk festivals
from Minneapolis to New York City, mostly performing tracks from her latest CD,
"Not A Pretty Girl." Now, after Rolling Stone reviewed her album and took her
picture, alterna-folk-rock deity Ani DiFranco returns to Ann Arbor for an 8 p.m.
show tonight at the Power Center. Tickets are $17.50 and $15.50 with $1.75
service charge apiece. All tickets available at the Union Ticket Office and
Ticketmaster. Call 763-TKTS for more info. And get ready for anything from
light-speed guitar work to impassioned vocals to percussion solos. Maybe even
a Prince cover tune.

- Ted Watts
Tar
Over and Out
Touch and Go
Alas! 'Tis the final Tar album. After
seven years and a whole mess of spiffy
hard, fast and high pitched Chicago-
based modern noise, Tar decided to
make this album their last. And they're
not even touring it. Their time is gone.
But the music lives on. "Over and
Out" is quite possibly the best rendered
of their work. It contains more subtlety
in the construction of its songs than
previous Tar works. The boys had al-
ways seemed a little anxious in making
their music chock full of energy and
ended up sacrificing a little bit on inter-
nal diversity. Not so here. "Building
Taj Mahal," for instance, strikes a com-
fortable posture between the wall of
sound most traditionally indicative of

the band and a more laid back construc-
tion which removes it to an easier lis-
tening plane. It's individual sections
are still all intense, but not oppressively
so.
Most of the songs have learned this
lesson. John Mohr's vocals are still
their screaming best when they need to
be, but are not as overwhelming any-
more. "Q.V.C." is actually a completely
soft song, something virtually unthink-
able in most of Tar's discography.
Maybe it's something about the nature
of home shopping...
Maybe it's just the band's old age,
but they seem to have reached a matu-
rity and finesse in their music on this
after-death release that could only-re-
ally be seen in glimpses before now.
Tar's fans can be comforted by the
band's last bow being extremely satis-
fying.And if you never knew them, you
can at the very least get this jewel of a
CD.
- Ted 'tatts

Read the Daily

Jawbreaker poisoned the photographer, who was keeling over when he took this.

J
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Musical wizards from oz
The 33rd Annual Chamber Arts Series of the University Musical Society begins
tonight with a performance by the Australian Chamber Orchestra. Under the able
bow of violinist Richard Tognetti, the ACO will play works by Handel, Haydn and
Walton.
Australia's sole national orchestra will be joined by the celebrated hornist Barry
Tuckwell. Tuckwell, hailed by many as a master of the French horn, left a coveted
first chair position in the London Symphony in order to accomplish his goal of
restoring the horn to solo status.
The orchestra will perform at 8 p.m. in Rackham Auditorium. Tickets range from
$20 to $32, and student rush tickets are available for $10. For additional informa-
tion, call the UMS Box Office at 764-2538.

Keep reading
the Daily.

'1

The National Theatre of the Deaf
presents

h'

CUaP

a t

A madcap comedy by
Eugene Labiche & Marc-Michel
You See and Hear Every Word!
Wednesday, October 18th, 8:00 pm
The Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets are available at the Michigan Union
Ticket Office and all Ticketmaster Outlets
Charge by phone, 763-TKTS or (810) 645-6666
Find us on the Internet at http://www.umich.edu/-mevents
A U-M Office of Major EventslDiWsion of Student Affairs & The Hearing Impaired Student Coaltion Presentation

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