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September 25, 1995 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-25

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IM.~

The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 25,

1995 - 7A

LSA-SG pres. pushes to
extend drop-add deadline

-- --9w _,.

By Jeff Lawson
For the Daily
If LSA Student Government Presi-
dent Richard Bernstein is successful,
the '"W" may become a grade of the
past
Bernstein is pushing to have the cur-
rent three-week drop-add deadline ex-
tended to nine weeks.
"This would permit students to with-
draw from a class up to the end of the
ninth week of a full term without re-
ceiving a 'W' on his or her transcript,"
re'said.
Under the current policy, students
can drop classes until the ninth week,
but receive a "W" report card grade if it
occurs after the three-week drop-add
&eriod. Bernstein said he worries about
the impact of a "W" on student tran-
scripts.
"It's a concern for students applying
to graduate schools or other positions.
... Why should they have to explain
away a 'W'?" Bernstein asked. "Some-
one can receive a 'W' for being sick,
near death, in the hospital or for drop-
ping a class in the fourth week... there's
no differentiation."
Bernstein noted that LSA has the

earliest drop deadline when compared
to the other colleges in the University.
In addition, he said he finds no "intel-
lectual reason"for the three-week dead-
line, claiming it was originally chosen
arbitrarily for billing purposes.
Bernstein is submitting his proposal to
several University bodies, including the
Joint CurriculumCommittee and the Joint
Student Faculty Committee, two com-
mittees providing guidance for LSA
policy. He also will raise the issue at the
next LSA faculty meeting, where the
final decision will eventually be made.
"It was my fit t commitment, a prom-
ise I made and Iplan to fulfill it," Bernstein
said. "It's something I really want."
However, others don't share his en-
thusiasm for the plan. "Some faculty
members have raised concerns that three
weeks is already too long to add classes,"
said Dean Schoem, Joint Faculty-Stu-
dent Policy Committee chair.
Schoem's committee, one of two
currently looking into the proposal, will
not meet until October. Comprised of
both student and faculty members, the
committee will discuss the issue from
both points of view. "The committee
will look into changes in the drop-add

policy and, if it decides to do so, will
bring it before the faculty," he said.
Chuck Judge, director of LSA advis-
ing,broughtup otherconcems. "The dead-
line helps students know what classes
they're in and what they're not in, espe-
cially with the number of closed classes,"
he said. "Classes are a limited resource
and we need to make sure that people
taking courses are serious about it."
Additionally, Judge has previously
served as a graduate admissions officer
at Harvard University. "I don't remem-
ber noting a "W" on a transcript during
that time," he recalled. "However, there
are times that it does matter ... if an
applicant to medical school dropped
organic chemistry twice, it would raise
a flag."
Other universities have similar drop/
add policies, which Bernstein said he
has investigated.
Bernstein said that at Brown Univer-
sity, a student can drop a class at any
time, even after the final grade has been
submitted. Many other east coast uni-
versities institute "shopping periods"
for students to settle into classes. "If
Harvard, Yale, Stanford and Brown can
do it, why can't we?" asked Bernstein.

LOANS
Continued from Page IA
because we think this is a good pro-
gram for colleges all over the country
and to cap it would be a real shame,"
Harrison said. "The fact is that the col-
lege loan program is one of the few
really good programs the federal gov-
ernment has for college students."
Tolo said that the department will
wait- to set criteria on which schools
would be cut-from the program.
I don't think anyone could say that
any school would not be cut. I think any
school would be liable to be cut,"he said.
"Certainly some large schools as well as
small schools would have to be cut."

- -----

In the House, Republicans plan to
introduce a propbsal that would elimi-
nate the program altogether.
Under the~direct loan program, uni-
versities work directly with a servicer
contracted by the Department of Edu-
cation. Under the guaranteed loan pro-
gram, which makes up the remainder of
federal loans, the University had dealt
with 1,400 lenders, guarantors and
servicers in providing federal aid.
All federal loans at the University
now come through the direct loan pro-
gram, which is strongly supported by
President James J. Duderstadt.
Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.), a member
of the Labor Co pmittee and the chief
congressional spdpsor ofthe direct loan

program, said in a statement that the
lenders of the guaranteed loan program
are fighting to remove direct loans.
"This would be a new entitlement
program for the student loan industry,
taking the choice away from colleges
and ending the competition that has
benefited students," Simon said.
The plan also reduces funds to the
Department of Education for adminis-
tering the direct and guaranteed loan
program by $750 million - up from a
$700 million cut in the initial bill.
Tolo said the cut would have a major
impact on the department's ability to
prevent fraud and abuse in the student
loan programs.

WALTER VANDYKE/IaVy
Echoes
Frangoise Gilot stands by a piece of her collection, which is on exhibit at the Art and Architecture Buiding until Oct. 19.
Gsleak i chemical hose tigers
fire, evacuation ofECSBidn

.BURNHAM
Continued from Page 1A
though in walking distance, has now
moved to the point where it is smack in
the middle of a residential area."
The association asked the University
to investigate some of the other sites
originally under consideration for the
d ieational center - mainly a plot of
land by the Washington Heights en-
trance to the Arb.
$ut University Planner Fred Mayer
0idthe Geddes Road site offered sev-
eral advantages - a compatable scale
for the Burnham House, a direct view
into the Arb and a space on the same
side of the street as the entrance.
Mayer also said that moving the

Burnham House would cost one-third
as much as constructing an entirely new
center.
"In terms of a site for a historical
residence, the architecture students felt
(the Washington Heights site) would be
the least desireable. There is no resi-
dential context an4the huge University
hospital would overpower the small
house," Mayer said. "The future devel-
opment that might take place in this
area would cause a problem."
Ann Arbor residents, however, said
they found many weak aspects of the
plan for Geddes Road. A lack of park-
ing around the entrance, increased
school bus traffic and the obstruction of
views of the neighborhood were chief
concerns.
"We who daily, see the dangerous

crossing on the crest of the hill on
Geddes know it's not the place to en-
courage people to cross," said Jane
Ferguson, president-elect of the
Oxbridge Neighborhood Association.
"It would further impact the terrible
parking situation for students and resi-
dents."
With residents and regents looking to
work together in future discussions, talk
is again turning to the construction ofa
new center.
"That site is a very unique site. It's
one of the few places that invites you
into the Arb, and I'd hate to restrict it
more," said President James J.
Duderstadt. "It might be possible to
design a cost-effective center for this
purpose and find another site for the
house."

By Michelle Lee Thompson
Daily Staff Reporter
Although fire alarms often go ig-
nored at South Quad, students and fac-
ulty who heard it took seriously an
alarm that went off in the Electrical
Engineering and Computer Science
Building on North Campus on Friday.
The alarm was triggered by a gas leak
in a hose attached to a tank of boron
trichloride housed in a cabinet in the
Solid-State Electronics Laboratory at 2
p.m., Department of Public Safety offi-
cials confirmed.
DPS Lt. Wesley Skowron said the
leak was contained immediately.
"The safety officer was able to se-
cure it right away," Skowron said.
Although the leak presented little
immediate danger to the building's
occupants, a crowd of about 200
people waited outside the building
for about 10 minutes before returning

to classes and labs. Some in the build-
ing did not hear the alarm and were
not evacuated.
A unit from the Ann Arbor Fire De-
partment was called to the scene, but
Skowron said that by the time the unit
arrived, DPS and the staff of the lab had
effectively capped the leak.
Wayne Devezin, a solid-state lab
engineer, said the building is supposed
to be evacuated completely whenever
fire alarms go sound, regardless of their
causes.
"Any time we have an alarm, we
evacuate the building- anytime, even
if the alarm is false," Devezin said.
Solid-state lab staff walked out of the
EECS Building wearing theirlab attire,
which includes headgear and a full suit
of protective material.
One member of the solid-state re-
search group said, "We're the first ones
out of the building because we know

what's in there," referring to the reac-
tive chemicals stored in labs through-
out the EECS Building.
But Devezin said the leak presented
little danger even to the workers in the
laboratory since the ,leaky line was
housed in a cabinet of the lab's "clean
room."
"We just shut the cylinder of one of
the lines off and we're going to find out
where the leak came from later,"
Devezin said.
Workers in the lab said the leak and
impending alarm did not seriously
damage their experiments, but that
such interruptions can cause prob-
lems.
"There are some experiment set-ups
that if you're in the middle of doing
something, you could lose what you
have been doing for years," said Peter
Goetz, a research assistant in the solid-
state lab.

i

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