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September 22, 1995 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.MESC
database
tohelp
New computer program
sorts jobs by area and
industry
By Dawn Spechier
For the Daily
A new Michigan Employment Secu-
rity Commission database project could
make job-hunting easier for graduating
students by providing listings of com-
panies, broken down by industry, in the
Southeast Michigan area.
"This project is basically ajob count,"
said Charles Lake, chief of MESC Cov-
ered Employment Statistics and Analy-
i15.
"If a student called the MESC for
information regarding a certain area of
employment, let's say retail for example,
we could give them a listing of retail
businesses' addresses in the southeast
area by town."
This data could help the student know
which areas to start looking for em-
ployment in, Lake said.
MESC began mapping businesses
by town about a year ago. Lake said
the MESC plans to have the addresses
of all employers in the state of Michi-
gan mapped into the data bank through
a process called geo-coding by next
year.
"Geo-coding is a powerful comput-
erized mapping process that assigns a
geographic identifier to every business
location," said John Amberger, the
Southeast Michigan Council of Gov-
ernments executive director. "MESC is
one of the first state employment agen-
cies in the country to have geo-coded
business locations and will regularly
update the information to give our cus-
tomers the most current data."
SEMCOG, along with MESC and
'the Michigan Department of Transpor-
tation, funded the project.
For more information about the new
databaseprojectandavailablejob data,
Icontact Lake at (313) 876-5422 orJef-
frey Jones, the SEMCOG project coor-
dinator at (313) 961-4266.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 22, 1995 - 7
Investor Zell to teach class
in isk-taking' this winter

By Jennifer Harvey
Daily Staff Reporter
A 53-year-old University alum is not
only this year's DeRoy seminar profes-
sor; he is also the driving force behind
a multi-billion dollar empire.
Sam Zell was invited to the DeRoy
professorship by the University Honors
Program, which sponsors the class each
year. The class, Honors 493, is a semi-
nar in "risk-taking."
"He's famous for being extremely
forthright. He goes straight to the point
and says exactly what he thinks," said
Ruth Scodel, Honors Program direc-
tor. "For a lot of our students he rep-
resents something completely differ-
ent."
In a recent profile in The Wall Street
Journal, Zell was pegged as a classic

"vulture" investor. He built his empire,
Equity Group Investments Inc., by buy-
ing faltering properties and businesses
and turning them into profitable ven-
tures.
The empire includes 24,500 mobile
home sites, 57,250 apartments, and 15
million square feet of retail space. New
York City's Rockefeller Center is his
most recent acquisition, the Journal said.
Zell, a native of Chicago, graduated
from the University with a bachelor's
degree in political science in 1963. He
continued at the University, graduating
from the Law School in 1966.
Scodel said Honors was eagerto have
Zell as the DeRoy professor because,
"He's a very interesting guy. We want
to bring in people who are not tradi-
tional academics and give them a chance

to have seminars with the students. We
want to get people to have real contact
with the students."
Scodel also said Zell was eager to
begin the professorship. "The chance to
work with students is a big lure. He was
interested in doing something differ-
ent."
Students may apply totake the course
in the Honors Office, beginning Mon-
day. Honors students in any field will
have priority for the course, but all
students may apply.
The deadline for priority admittance
is Oct. 6. After that, students may be
admitted on a space availability basis.
The course is offered as one credit for
winter term. The class will meet Nov.
14 and 28, Dec. 5, and Jan. 16 and 23
from 3 to 5 p.m.

STEPHANIE GRACE LIM/Daily
Artist at work
World-renowned painter Francolse Gliot teaches a workshop on composition and
color yesterday at the School of Art. Gliot's display will open tonight at the
Slusser Gallery and run through Oct. 19.

Detroit New
DETROIT (AP) - A Teamsters of-l
fer to reduce the union's contract de-1
mands for striking circulation employ-
ees was rejected as inadequate yester-
day by Detroit Newspapers negotia-
tors.
Detroit Newspapers, which handles
the business and production operations
of The Detroit News and Detroit Free
Press, wants deeper job cuts than it
sought before the strike began July 13.
"We have to staff at the level we're
distributing," said company negotiator
Tim Kelleher. "Thatmeans fewerpeople
will come back to work."
Teamsters negotiator Frank Kortsch
said the union offered to take off the
table its earlier proposal to rework the
compensation and work rules for dis-
trict circulation managers.
He said the union also offered to
reduce the value of its proposed com-
mission increase for drivers who de-

spapers rejects
liver papers to stores by $7.2 million. progres
Kelleher said the Teamsters' commis- Kelle
sion offer represented only a $1 million commis
cut. from its
Kortsch said, "We said to them in copy fo
plain English, 'Let's save this commu- for Sun
nity the misery it's going through and sions ar
let's go back to the proposals we had on cents fo
July 12 and hammer out a contract."' Detr
Teamsters Local 372 represents 1,150 posed t
drivers, circulation workers and cus- tion ma
tomer service representatives. It is the in ligh
largest of six unions on strike against Kellehe
the newspapers. unlikel
Kathleen Dollan, a Local 372 mem- once th
ber, attended an informational meeting "if th
last night for the six striking unions. no reasc
Dollan echoed the feelings of several We nee
people walking into the meeting who and abc
said they want to know what can be Thec
done to speed up the talks. many a
"I think things are going a little slow union e
but I think they're doing a little bit of district

s," Dollan said.
her said the union proposed a
sion of 4 cents a copy, down
s earlier proposal for 5 cents a
r weekday editions and 6 cents
day editions. Current commis-
re 1 cent for weekdays and 2
or Sundays, Kelleher said.
oit Newspapers originally pro-
o eliminate 59 district circula-
nager jobs, but now wants more
ht of "changed conditions,"
er said. Circulation is down and
yy to return to previous levels
ie strike ends, he said.
he work has gone away, there's
on to bring as many people back.
ed about half as many pressmen
out a third as many mailers."
company did not indicate how
additional jobs it wants cut. The
arlier had agreed to eliminate 30
manager jobs, Kortsch said.

proposal

CODE
Continued from Page 1.
deadline throughout the process.
"I would hope that we have shown
that we are not trying to dodge a bullet,"
Wainess said. "I would much rather
have the issue over with. But we would
find a much better and smoother pro-
cess if you wait."
The six-person workgroup that has
been putting a draft recommendation
together plans to have a proposal ready
for Hartford's office by Sept. 27. There
are no current plans to release the draft
to the public.
President James J. Duderstadt said

661would hope
that we have
shown that we are
not trying to
dodge a bullet."f
- Flint Wainess
M SA president
last week that if the proposed new code
is not accepted at the October regents
meeting, he would move to implement
another university's code here.

ADDRESS
Continued from Page :i
to increase and I think it's important
that they see us as a working partner and
not just another student group, because
we're not."
Wainess told of increased communi-
cations between the assembly and its
constituents, and addressed campus
safety concerns.
"With construction ... sometimes
safety concerns can be forgotten,"
Wainess said.

Wainess also requested that the re-
gents postpone the board's October
deadline to November for voting on the
draft of the Statement of Student Rights
and Responsibilities that Hartford's
office is currently working on.
Several assembly members were
present at the board's meeting to hear
Wainess and Goodstein speak, includ-
ing LSA Rep. Andrew Wright.
"I'm glad that we're.finally being
allowed to speak at the regents' meet-
ing," Wright said. However, Wright
said he thought that the assembly's of-

ficers should have taken a stronger po-
sition against the statement, the
University's code ofnon-academic con-
duct.
"I would have liked to see them ad-
vocate what I think is the assembly's
official position, which is that we don't
want a code but we're willing to work
within the process," Wright said.
Student Rights Commission chair
Anne Marie Ellison said, "I think it
builds credibility for us to take a strong
position on student rights issues, even if
the regents don't agree with it."

. ST UDENT
Continued from Page 1
Goldstein called for his classmates to
always treat their patients with compas-
sion and not lose touch with their hu-
manity.
"Don't be afraid to be the one who
lends the hand to squeeze or be the
comforting voice," Goldstein said in
his address. "Let your patient know he/
y she is not alone."
Goldstein used his experiences as
both doctor and patient as the basis of
his book. "Hidden Lessons" is in the
early stages of publication by a division
of Little, Brown.
Judge said Goldstein's book initially
started as a MedicalSchool project. As
the illness progressed, Goldstein ex-
panded the paper into a small book. A
fund has been started to supply copies
I of "Hidden Lessons" to all third-year
medical students.
While "Hidden Lessons" is being
published as an academic book, Judge
expressed hopes that it may eventually
be released as a trade book.
"Having never been sick, he never

Book Fund
Donations to the Adam i. Goldstein
Student Book Fund to help provide
copies of "Hidden Lessons" to third.
year medical school students can be
sent to:
Medical Center Alumni and
Development OfficeI
301 E. Liberty
Suite 300
Ann Arbor,.MI 48104
would have written this book," said
Karin Rockind, a family friend. "And
now that he's written this book, he'll
touch so many more people."
Goldstein graduated from Flint
Southwestern High School, lettering in
soccer, football and baseball, before
making the MSU football team as a
walk-on.
At MSU, Goldstein graduated with
highest honors. His talents also carried
into other sports and a hobby as an
artist.
"He made everything seem pretty
effortless," Mrs. Goldstein said. "He
was such a modest person. I would have
to do the bragging for him."

Judge described Goldstein as "mild-
mannered, pleasant, very friendly. He
was just a real neat kid."
"Everybody liked him," said Dr.
Linda Sherman, a former classmate and
close friend. "He was a nice guy you
could count on ifyouneeded him. Some-
one you could trust, very simple. There
was no hidden agenda."
Sherman last saw Goldstein two
nights before his death. She said he was
unable to conduct a conversation, com-
municating mainly through nods and
motions.
During the last week-and-a-half, the
Goldsteins moved back to Adam's par-
ents' home in Flint. Mrs. Goldstein
describes it as "a very incredible week
for all of us, because we were able to
have closure."
On the Wednesday before his death,
Goldstein was overcome with a great,
sense ofjoy. "He felt a rush of euphoria.
He couldn't describe it," Mrs. Goldstein
said.
He died three days later.
The lessons of Adam Goldstein's ill-
ness may have been hidden, but the
legacy he leaves will likely hold an
effect for a long time.

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