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September 19, 1995 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-19

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9
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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 19, 1995 - 7

Achool Students suffer through fall allergies

By Cathy Harmon
For the Daily
The beginning of fall means books,
study groups and exams. For many stu-
dents it also means sneezing, sniffling
and watering eyes.
"There does seem to be a larger num-
ber of students experiencing allergy
symptoms for the first time and stu-
dents with allergies are having worse
symptoms," said Dr. Caesar Briefer,
director of the University Health Ser-
vice.
Briefer said UHS does not have exact
numbers to relay this increase in allergy
sufferers because the percentages are
determined at the end of the term.
FIRE
Continued from Page 1
tion, said the national group is working
with Ann Arbor's fire marshal.
After fire department officials dis-
covered that a first-floor room had been
broken into Sunday, they contacted
Alpha Contracting Inc. of Ann Arbor to
board up the house to prevent similar
incidents, said company owner Allan
Lutes.
"There was additional unauthorized
entry into the building on Sunday,"
Rayburnsaid, but would not discuss
anything else about the alleged break-
in.
John Alli,president of the fraternity's
alumni association in Michigan said the
house is covered by commercial prop-
erty insurance, which includes a clause
that entitles the owners to replacement
causes. Alli said, "It is our expectation
that the loss will be covered."
The policy is with the CNA insur-
ance company, based in the Detroit
suburb of Southfield. Alli said the claim
will be filed probably later this week
after an adjuster has studied the house.
The Michigan Arson Prevention
Committee has offered up to $5,000 in
reward money for leads to how the fire
started. Large red signs were posted
around the house yesterday, displaying
a phone number to call.

"Fall is the worst time of the year for
ragweed hay fever," Briefer said. "Also,
the unusual weather patterns this sea-
son may be why so many students are
experiencing worse allergy symptoms."
Allergies cannot be cured-medica-
tions are the only relief aside from stay-
ing indoors in air-conditioning.
Allergy symptoms beyond the help
of any antihistamines may require im-
munization shots, which are available
at the UHS.
In the past few years, an increasing
number of non-sedating antihistamines
have appeared on the market. There are
also nasal steroids, such as Vancenase,
and eye drops, such as Alomide, avail-

able.
Without a prescription, Chlor-
Trimeton is available as a non-sedating
over-the-counter allergy medicine.
Information provided by Briefer
shows the difference between prescrip-
tion and over-the-counter medicines.
Only 10 percent of the allergy suffer-
ers who took prescription-brand Seldane
became drowsy while 20 percent of
those who took Chlor-Trimeton became
drowsy. Both are marketed as non-se-
dating allergy medications.
When one maintains proper dosage,
the effect of drowsiness will wear off
with continued use of the medicine,
Briefer said.

MSA
Continued from Page 1
that resulted in favor of a 25-cent raise in
student fees for the Ann Arbor Tenants
Union, the AATU will receive $18,250.
"That's the bare minimum," Van
Eeuwijk said. "The AATU does play a
very important part in students' lives."
Although Rackham Rep. Roger
DeRoo said "the budget process has not
been kind to the AATU in the past," he
said the tenants' union was allocated
the amount it requested.
Because MSA will not be retaining
the services of a state lobbying firm that
cost the assembly $26,000 last year,
Wainess said drafters were able to add.
$4,500 to the Women's Issues Com-
mission budget and $1,300 to the Com-
munications Committee for an MSA
newsletter, among other increases.
Although neither the payroll nor the
operations line items ofthe internal bud-
get saw increases, both are the topic of
bipartisan scrutiny. Wainess said he
wants to see an investigation of the ad-
ministrative coordinator's position, but
Van Eeuwijk said the formation of a
committee to draw up a job description
for the position was "not in good faith."
"They still want someone in there 40
hours (a week)," Van Eeuwijk said.
Since former Administrative Coordi-
nator Heather Lowman left in August,

the position has been filled part-time by
Lou Stefanic.
The draft budget includes aprovision
for the formation of a committee to
evaluate the need for an administrative
coordinator.
The budget also includes a first-time
$11,150 provision for a discussion se-
ries, which Wainess said he hopes will
attract speakers including possible presi-
dential candidates Rev. Jesse Jackson
and Bill Bradley.
However, Van Eeuwijk said he was
unclear as to the purpose of the discussion
series and that no focus had been pre-
sented.
"It's a big sum of money to go
unallocated," Van Eeuwijk said. A doc-
toral candidate in economics, Van Euwijk
said he spearheaded an internal cam-
paign during the drafting of the budget to
allocate funds more specifically.
Van Eeuwijk had asked committee
and commission chairs to present bud-
gets for the first time in the assembly's
recent history. Although many commit-
tees have turned in those budgets this
past week, none had been submitted by
last Tuesday's meeting, further pushing
back the draft budget's completion.
Next Tuesday, assembly members
will have the opportunity to amend the
proposed draft -the "budget meeting"
has traditionally been one of the longest
on the assembly's calendar.

Assembly
sdebates
sanctions
for faclty
By Stephanie Jo Klein
Daily Staff Reporter
The debate over tying specific re-
sponsibilities to tenured appointments
marked the year's first meeting of fac-
ulty government yesterday.
George Brewer, professor of human
genetics and the chair of the Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs, emphatically supported the idea
ofsanctioning inadequate performance.
Brewer targeted 2 1/2 percent of the
faculty as giving unsatisfactory perfor-
mances. He suggested peer evaluations
as a way to review tenured faculty.
"It is critically important for the exist-
ence of tenure that we police it," he said.
He suggested that unsatisfactory per-
formances by tenured faculty be sanc-
It is critically
important for the
existence of
tenure that we
police it"
- George Brewer
SACUA chair

DAMIAN CAP/Daily
Hey, look at that
LSA junior Emily Trojanowski and LSA senior Shreyas Shah read the kiosk at the
comer of State Street and North University Avenue yesterday.
Conversation Partners helps
foreign students learn English

I

SERVER/DISHWASHERS needed for BABYSIITER/DRIVER needed Mon. & HERB DAVID GUITAR Studio 302 E.
Friday evenings. Call 769-0500. Wed. 3-4. Own car, salary neg. Call Elayne at Liberty, 665-8001. Instruments, instruments,

STUDENT CUSTODIANS for Fall and
Winter 1995-96 Terms are needed at Student
Publications. We are looking for students in
good physical condition for cleaning, lifting
and odd job. Students who are enthusiastic,
punctual and flexible will receive top
consideration. Good working conditions. Pay
$6.40 per hour. Must be available 8:15 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m. at least two days a week. Work
Studies welcome, but not required. Apply
now. Call 764-0550 or stop by room 210A
Student Publications, 420 Maynard Street.

"141=1333 anvttme. books, books, books. Not just guitar.

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS w/ early
childhood exp. are welcome to apply for pre-
school & kindergarten teaching positions at
The Discovery ener, West Al Call 663-
7496. EOE.
SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS w/ early
childhood work exp. are welcome to apply
for preschool & kindergarten teaching posi-
tions at The Discovery Center, West A2. Call
663-7496. EOE.
TEACHERS ASSISTANT needed in child
care center to work with 4-5 yr. olds. 1 mi.
from cam pus. 12-5:30 & 11:30-2:30 M-F.
56.25 to S7.25/hr. 761-2576.
TELEPHONE INTER VI EWERS needed
for nationally known public research firm in
downtown Ann Arbor. Day, eve., wknd.,
shifts avail. Fun work environment. Paid
prkg. EOE. 313-994-0003.
THE EARLE RESTAURANT is hiring
hosts. Weeknights & weekends. S6/hr. Call
994-0211 or apply in person @ 121 \V.
Washington.
THIE MICHIGAN DAILY display staff is
looking for a photographer. Flexible hours.
Must own camera. Start immediately. Ex-
perience preferred. Call Dan for more details
at 764-0662.
TIOS NEEDS YOU! Cook & counter help.
Will train. Good wages excellent hours, a
nice place to work. Ful or part time. 333 E.
Huron. 761-6650.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK Make
up to S25-45/hr. teaching basic conversa-
tional English in Japan, Taiwan, or S. Korea.
No teaching Background or Asian languages
required. For information call: 206/632-1146
ext. J55981.
WANTED EXPERIENCED, ENERGETIC
certified aerobics instructors. Good pay.
Please contact Leslie at One On One Athletic
Club, Ann Arbor 313-761-4440.
'WORK STUDY funded students needed for
lab & office jobs. Pay rate of $6/hr. Call Kate
at 763-0651.
WORK STUDY/STUDENT needed for
Clinical Research Center to run errands, use
copy machine, answer phones & miscel-
laneous office work. Mac computer skills
desired. Location University Hospital. Call
Eric or Jeanne at 936-8080.
WORK STUDY POSITIONS avail. Posi-
tions are now avail. at the League Ticket
office. Join a fun & exciting environment sel-
ling tix for our 1995-1996 season. Perks in-
clude free tix to all our shows. Still
interested? Call Maureen at 764-0450.
WORK STUDY STUDENTS. Needed 2-3
lab positions available. 10-20 hrs./wk. $7.50/
hr. Call Beverly 747-3998.
Y & S YOGURT and sandwich is
expanding. New location, all shifts. 5 a.m.-11
.m.Full& part-time. Mgmt., bakers, counter
elp, delivery drivers, prep. 313/662-7701.

BABYSITTER WANTED. Occasional
evenings & afternoons. 663-9566.
BURNS PARK mom anxious to hire a Tues./
Thur. 8 a.m.- 1 p.m. babysitter for two
adorable kids: 5 & 2. Must have own
transportation. Please call 741-8132.
CHILD CARE & light housekeeping needed
in our home. 7-10 hrs./wk. Reliable car. 662-
5200.
CHILD CARE NEEDED Wed. 3-6 .m.
Non-smoker, own trans. Ref. Sharon 741-
9088.
DAYCARE PROVIDER needed. 2
children. Weekdays 3-5:30. Need car. Ann
Arbor location. Call Barb @ 996-3078.
EXPERIENCED PERSON TO CARE for
3 kids (4, 6, 8) Wed. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Near
campus, own car, references 994-4535.
FATHER'S HELPER wanted thru. mid-
June. Mon.-Fri. 3-7p.m., care for 2 boys aged
10 & 14, general management of household,
incl. help w/ cooking, running errands & light
cleaning. Own car needed, ref. req., min. age
19. 5180/week. 741-7425.
HOENIE HELPER/Child care. Part-time.
761-7204.
LOOKING FOR occasional eve. babysitters
for 12 & 9 yr. old girls. Will provide
transportation. Spanish speaking students are
urged to apply, but all reliable & entertaining
students will be considered. Call Marcia at
668-7569.
MOTHER'S HELPER needed Mon.-Fri.
afternoons 3-7. Car nec. 973-7221 eves.
OUR CHILDREN need you to play & learn
with them at our child care centers - one mile
from campus. If you are available any full
days M-F, please call 761-2576. S6.15/hr.
OUR SCHOOL age children need you to
play with them in our afterschool program at
Gretchen's House Child care Center I mile
from campus. 3-5 days a week, 2:30-5:45.
Please call us at 761-2576. S6.48/hr.
RESPONSIBLE, ENERGETIC assistant
needed to work in a small home day care.
Call Erin at 668-7592.
SITTER WANTED for Wed. after 3 & some
wknds. Start now. 2 fun kids. Car & refs. Call
Ramona 572-9506.
WORK WITH CHILDREN in home group
day care. Must be loving and hardworking.
Very rewarding job. Angela 663-4067.

DO YOU LIKE HORSES? Join UM E-
questrian Team and Club. We ride English
and Westem. Our next meeting Sept 24 MLB
Rm. B16 at 8:00 p.m. Horse showing Call
913-6959: Riding program Ann or Katie 930-
9527.
DO YOU WANT to be reunited or confront
a one night stand? You could be on a national
talk show! Call Stacy collect right away! 212/
246-6813 or 212/582-1722 ext. 23.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over S6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is now
available. All students are eligible regardless
of grades, income, or parent's income. Let us
help. Call Student Financial Services: 1-800-
263-6495 ext. F5598.1.
PARKING SPACE needed on Central Cam-
Fus immediately. Call 434-1644.
SHEAR IMPACT hair salon now has a nail
technician. 548 Church St. 313/ 662-4232.

By Alisa N. Stein
For the Daily
Tomoe Uno has been in Ann Arbor
for five months.
She did not speak English before
coming to Ann Arbor.
After intensive language classes and
a friendship with her conversation part-
ners, Uno says her language skills have
improved.
Uno is one of about 110 international
students learning English with the help
of the Michigan Language Center and
its conversation partner program.
Co-director Ira Fisher said the pro-
gram was founded 17 years ago as a
part-time program independent from
the University. It has since expanded
into a full-time one.
The program also offers several op-
portunities to University students.
"For language students at the Uni-
versity, Conversation Partners offers a
chance to widen hisworldview," Fisher
said. "It's an opportunity to meet people
from other countries, ask questions and
practice his language skills."
English is not the only thing Uno has
learned.
Her conversation partner, who is black,
is one of the first non-Asian people she
has ever developed a friendship with.
Uno said she feels the exposure to varied
ethnicities and cultures is positive.
"I will miss the different people when
I go back to Japan. I think I grow up more
than I was in Japan," Uno said. "When I
was in Japan I was very narrow. Now, I
changed my mind a little, I think."
Fisher said Uno's experience is typi-
cal of an MLC student. "Our students

For more information
Students interested in the program
should call 663-9415. The center is.
located at 309 S. State St.
really are sponges, they come with their
country's biases but once they are here,
they're totally open," he said.
To study in the United States while
on a visa, a person must be enrolled in
at least 20 hours of class per week. As
a supplement to scheduled class time,
the center offers several extra-curricu-
lar enrichment activities.
The Conversation Partners program
is one of its most popular offerings.
The free program, organized by Nancy
Lee, the center's administrative secre-
tary, currently has 40 foreign participants.
After an initial meeting at the center,
each student and partner meeton an infor-
mal basis for about two hours per week.
For this semester, about 10 of the
students are Spanish-speaking; with
many of the others being of Thai, Ko-
rean and Japanese origin.
A participant in the program specifies
whether he or she wants an "English
only" or "Mixed Language" partner.
Fisher said, "We recruit English
speakers primarily from the University
community," as well as send informa-
tion to various departments.
Perhaps the best support of interna-
tional student exchange comes from
Uno. When asked what she likes most
about America, she responded, "I think
in America, dreams come true. So, when
I go back to Japan, maybe I can do
anything I want to."

tioned by losses of raises,perks, office
space or salary reductions.
SACUA member and Chemistry Prof.
Tom Dunn led the charge against any
form of sanctions on tenured faculty.
Dunn disputed Brewer's view on the
basis that "the rights of tenure are never
absolute."
SACUA member Louis D'Alecy, a
physiology professor, added to Dunn's
argument, saying that giving tenure strict
criteria would destroy academic freedom.
"Tenure is based on integrity and
trust. Written laws and sanctions de-
mean their very existence," he added.
Kurt Brandle, assembly member and
an architecture and urban planning pro-
fessor, said that he did not want to
eliminate tenure. "We want to help the
2 1/2 percent (of faculty). If we can do
something about them, then it makes
tenure more secure," Brandle said. "We
are not arguing for a set of global rules,
but a process that allows flexibility."
After the debate and rebuttals, mem-
bers of the assembly were allowed to
take the floor.
Dentistry Prof. John Gobetti dis-
agreed with the premise of the debate.
"I would not want to see us reviewing
ourselves. I think it would play to the
hands of the administration - they
would like to see nothing more than to
see us tear ourselves apart."
The variety of opinions presented at
the debate provided members with food
for thought.
SACUA research associate Mary
Mandeville said that, "even though (the
members) didn't agree, it was impor-
tant to discuss the topic and get both
sides of the issue in the open."
The issue of tenure will be debated
again at the next Senate Assembly meet-
ing in October.

FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share fum. apt. w/ 3 others. Great location, 1
bik. from campus. Rent neg. 665-8746.
LOVELY PRIVATE locking bdmn. Share
luxury living rnm., state-of-the-art kitchen w/
1 other student. Exc. loc., 5495 incl. heat &
water. Prkg avail. Campus Rentals 665-8825.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE roommate(s)
wanted, one bedroom available, great
location. Call Dawn or Stacey @a 213-1644.
TENANT NEEDS APT. MATE for separate
bdrms. high grade unit. Edge of campus.
Good credit only. 665-8825.

7 -:::f )g|||- -
CRUISE & ACCOMIODATIONS in
Bahamas & Orlando. $400 for 2 people. 769-
6302.
ONE WAY ticket on 9/23 from Det. to NY-
JFK: $80. Call 741-5958.
ROMANTIC LOG CABINS on lake. $54-
75/night. Inc. outdoor hot tub, boats, canoes,
more. Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
SPRING BREAK REPS WANTED Form-
ing groups now. Call Dan, Regency Travel
665-6122, 209 S. State.
SPRING BREAK TRAVEL FREE with
SunSplash Tours. Highest commissions paid,
lowest prices. Campus Reps wanted! Sell
Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, Florida, Padre.
Rates & Info call 1-800/426-7710.

STONEWALL CHILI Pepper Co.'s salsa
habenero is one of the world's hottest salsas.
It is only sold in Michigan at Tios Mexican
Restaurant, 333 E. Huron.

I.

..'

31 YEAR OLD attractive professional male
seeks an attractive Muslim female 20 to 30
years old for a long term serious relationship.
Please, respond to P.O. Box 4053 Mount
Pleasant, MI 48804.

DETROIT LIVE!
One-on-One/Voice Personals
1-313-97.6-3000
Who nav morel Oniv6 9c/min.

I ' ' " Ci11 lC

11 tsartf i iii? , TT = 1

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