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September 14, 1995 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-14

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The Michigan Daily -Thursday, September 14, 1995 - 5A

Man claims accident in
killing of police officers

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. (AP) - A man ac-
cused of killing a policeman after escaping from
jail says he was trying to commit suicide when he
accidentally shot the officer.
"My intention was to shoot myself. Freedom
or death. Freedom was obtainable through death,"
Keith Harbin testified before a packed court-
room Tuesday.
Closing arguments in Harbin's murder trial
were heard Wednesday. The case went to the jury
yesterday afternoon.
Harbin faces seven counts in the Dec. 13
slaying of Grand Haven Public Safety Office
Scott Flahive, including first-degree premedi-
tated murder, first-degree murder of a police
officer and escape.
He also is charged with attempting to murder
Ottawa County Jail guard Cathy Shaw by strik-
ing her at least eight times with a laundry bag
containing a 4-pound chunk of concrete.
Harbin's getaway car was pulled over by three
police officers minutes after he and fellow in-
mate Freddie DeWitt escaped from the jail.
Flahive was killed as he approached the car
and was struck by a bullet fired from the back
seat.
Harbin testified he was attempting to place the
barrel of the loaded rifle against his head when

Ann Torres, a passenger in the car, grabbed at the
rifle.
He said it discharged when she pushed it away
from his head and the bullet struck Flahive as he
approached the car.
"I heard someone screaming 'Help me,' andI
looked out the door and saw the officer on the
ground, "I said 'I did not mean to do it. I did no'
mean to hurt anyone,"' Harbin testified.
Harbin also denied boasting to Michigan State
Police Trooper Ron Griffin that "I popped a white
cop" and that he said he would "pop a white cop
every chance I get" immediately after his arrest.
"I said I didn't have a beef with nobody. I jus"
wanted to be free," Harbin testified.
In closing arguments Wednesday, Prosecute
Ronald Frantz dismissed Harbin's suicide defense
saying that taking his own life would be inconsis
tent with numerous letters Harbin wrote stating fr
was ready to kill or be killed to be free.
"He expected others to kill him, the prosecdifo
said.
Torres and Yolanda Salazar, the alleged driver(
the getaway car, are scheduled to be tried sepa
rately in November. They are charged with aidin
a jail escape and first-degree murder.
DeWitt, who never made it to the escape vehidlc
was convicted earlier this year of jail escape.

ER~LZLABTHLIiLIPP-MAN/Daily

Mr. Atlas
Paulo Santos (right) and first-year student Michelle Studer carry promotional balloons during Festifall on the Diag yesterday.

For 36 hours,
fraternity
members to
sit on scaffold
By Stu Berlow
For the Daily
As if the Diag was not cluttered
enough with construction, Pi Kappa
Phi fraternity will add to the chaos
today and tomorrow, but for a good
cause: to raise money for the house's
philanthropy.
"We'll construct the scaffolding and
have two to three guys on top on a
couch," said LSA junior Nirav Shah,
chair of PUSH (People for the Under-
standing of the Severely Handi-
capped). "At any given time we'll
have two or three guys on top and
depending on how many show up, any
number below soliciting donations
and handing out pamphlets."
The scaffold will be spruced up with
colorful banners representing the house,
PUSH and companies that donated
equipment and supplies, Shah added.
The Scaffold Sit, however, is not a
typical Diag donation drive.
Various Pi Kappa Phi brothers will
remain on the couch, towering six feet
above ground in front of the Graduate
Library for 36 hours, from 8 o'clock
this morning until 8 p.m. tomorrow.
Though not necessary for the fund
drive, the marathon style benefits the
undertaking in other ways.
"The length oftime isjust for ingenu-
ity and creativity, for something differ-
ent," Shah said.
Pi Kappa Phi members work to bring
compassion to the event. "Our aim is
two fold - to raise awareness and to
raise money for the severely handi-
capped, especially children," Shah said.
Pi Kappa Phi has conducted the Scaf-
fold Sit for the past several years and,
Shah said, last year's effort brought in
approximately $1,000. Though no mon-
etary amount is targeted, the fraternity
hopes to exceed the 1994 figure.
CARTER
Continued from Page IA
outreach for students who have 'stopped
out' of school," Harper said. "Those
students who are still active in school
activities such as MSA but are no longer
in classes need our attention to get back
on the academic track."
Harper also said the office will look
into conducting exit interviews for stu-
dents who are thinking of leaving the
school to help them return here or go to
another institution in good standing.
She said there has not been much
progress with this idea in the past, but
she hopes Carter will be able to work on
such a program.
"Seventy-five percent of the new
position will be in working with under-
graduate students and the other 25 per-
cent will be in reconfiguring the of-
fice," Harper said. "We want to get as
much done in this year of transition as
possible."
Next year, Harper said, the Univer-
sity will look to hire a full-time om-
budsman, but there has been no discus-
Gin nn hec arlm.artor niate

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

THE 199

STFUDENT HALF-LPR1CJ

SEE

Cecilia Bartoli, mezzo-soprano
Slide Hampton and the JazzMasters
Australian Chamber Orchestra
Master Musicians of Jajouka
Central Ballet of China

" .
,.
.
.tr

The'Boston Symphony Orchestra for $10!
Marcus Roberts or the Alvin Ailey
American Dance Theatrefor $8!
"«" Valid Student I.!). required, limit 2 tickets per event
but choose as many events as you wish.
"«" Avoid Rush TPicket Sellouts.
"« Limited quantity available for each event.
+ Visa & MasterCard preferred; checks
and cash accepted.
($3 servicefee for credit (Yr/dpurc/hses.)
For more information on the 1995/96 season, stop
by the UMS box office in Burton Memorial Tower
behind Hill Auditorium.

I

Paco de Lucia's Flamenco Master Guitar Sextet
Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra
Peter Feranec, conductor
Boris Berezovsky, piano
Marcus Roberts Trio and Septet
The Choral Music of Arvo Part
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir
Tallinn Chamber Orchestra
Thnu Kaljuste, conductor
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
Tafelmusik
The Complete Solo Piano Music of Frederic Chopin
Garrick Ohlsson, piano (Recitals, IV, V and VI)
Handel's Messiah
Maurice Sendak's and Carole King's Really Rosie
Gil Shaham, violin
Orli Shaham, piano
Juilliard String Quartet
Boys Choir of Harlem
St. Louis Symphony
Leonard Slatkin, conductor
St. Petersburg Philharmonic
Yuri Temirkanov, conductor
Pamela Frank, violin
The Guthrie Theater of Minneapolis
k. (Impressions from Kafka's The Trial)
Harold Pinter's Old Times
Wynton Marsalis/Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra Nonet
Monk, Morton, and Marsalis
Feel the Spirit - An Evening of Gospel Music, with
The Blind Boys of Alabama featuring Clarence
Fountain, The Soul Stirrers, and Inez Andrews
The King's Singers
Boston Symphony Orchestra
Seiji Ozawa, conductor
Latin Jazz Summit, featuring Tito Puente, Arturo
Sandoval, and Jerry Gonzalez and
The Fort Apache Band
Moscow Virtuosi
Vladimir Spivakov, conductor/violin
SamulNori
New York City Opera National Company
Verdi's La Traviata
Sequentia
Tokyo String Quartet with Pinchas Zukerman
John Williams, guitar
San Francisco Symphony
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre
Borodin String Quartet
Ludmilla Berlinskaya, piano
Guitar Summit 11 with Kenny Burrell, jazz; Manuel
Barrueco, classical; Jorma Kaukonen, acoustic
blues; and Stanley Jordan, modern jazz
The Canadian Brass
Bach's b-minor Mass
Tallis Scholars
Ravi Shankar, sitar
Isrnal Philharmnnic Orchestra

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