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December 01, 1995 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Flam"Focus

The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 1, 1995 - 3

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Lglimpse into the...
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Big changes face
biggest'U' class
By Jonathan Berndt
Daily News Editor
W hen Jennifer Wlodarski traveled the 1,000 miles to Ann
Arbor for the first time in March, all she knew was that she
wanted a lot of variety when she got to college.
Little did the Orono, Maine, native know, she would be one of four
students from her home state in the largest incoming class in the
University's history.
"I really like the campus," she said. "Anywhere I'd go would be
bigger."
Compared to her high school of 400 and Ornono - home to the
University of Maine but only about 10,000 people - a school of
35,000 students might seem daunting.
"It's the biggest freshman class we've ever had," said Marilyn
Knepp, director of the Office of Academic Planning and Analysis.
"Other than that, I think it looks to be a fairly typical profile."
Wlodarski, who lives in East Quad as part of the Residential
College, said, "I didn't find it that hard (to adjust)."

Brain Scan
It may be the biggest class in University history, but what are they all doing
here? Below is where they enrolled, who they are and how they did in high
school. As a group, of course.

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Nursing
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MUsic
LSA
Kinesiology
Z Engineering
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hack Time4
iza has long been a favorite snack,
Sut a Daily survey shows
irst-year students only order it
bout once a week.
- Four or more
Three times times a week:
a week: 2.9%
7.4%
wice a
week: None:
16.2% 30.8%
Once a week
42.6%

Part of the reason for the huge class is
the 300extra in-state studentsthe Univer-
sity admitted in June.
"Those people aren't a lot different
from the last 1,000 that were admitted,"
Knepp said. "We aren't going to admit
students who aren't qualified."
For the more than 200 who enrolled,
the University prepared with a first-year
seminar program and additional sections
of regular courses.
"It seems to have worked," said John
Cross, LSA associate dean of budget and
finance. "We had fewer problems with
students being closed out of classes that
they wanted than we have had in the
past."
Christopher Verry, a Music student
from Grand Haven, on the Lake Michigan
coast, said he's had no problem with "the
size factor."
"I like a big environment. I like people,"
Verry said. "Whether you're in a class of

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White:
3,433
SHispanic:
243
SNative American:
39
Asian American:
Oin 587
EDAfrican American:
ho 496
Other (Unknown and
non-resident alien): 351

Gender Breakdown

Ethnic

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Academic
-Performance
While University students come with an
broad array of talents, academic reputati
starts with scores in high school. Here's
how this year's incoming class fared at th
secondary level.

400 or four, you're going to know the information. The only thing
that helps is the teacher knows you."'
He likes the Music School's smaller classes, which he says are
easier to get into.,
Knepp said her office, which is in charge of statistics used in
planning class offerings, is not doing anything special with the extra
students.
"At the time, they were noteworthy, but now they're just part of
the class," Knepp said. "We won't track them specially."
Alan Levy, director of public affairs for University Housing, said
the large class brought more people into the residence halls - about
200 more than in previous years.
Approximately 97 percent ofthe freshman class lives in University
Housing, even thought there's no requirement to do so," Levy said.
Part of the increase, Levy said, is due to additional spaces for the
University's living-learning programs.
Detroit native Kourtney Rice said about the only thing she doesn't
like so far is her room - an economy double in Stockwell.
"The room is really small," Rice said.
The classes and campus activities - she's active in Sister, a
multicultural group in Stockwell - keep her moving around.
SIf anything I've not been holed up in my room," she said.
Randy Miller, from Birmingham, Ala., made the long trek to Ann
Arbor to study computer engineering.
"I'd seen in magazines and other resources that Michigan was ranked
pretty respectful in those areas," Miller said. "And it had a better social
life" than the other school he was considering, Georgia Tech.
"It was overwhelming just how many people you see," Rice said.
"Otherwise, it's been what I expected."

High School
Grade Point Average
Below 3.4 3.4-3.59 3.6-3.79 3.8-3.99 4.0+

Composite SAT
score

Below 100- 100- 1400-
1000 1199 1399 1600

2. Illinois
_.-${- Daarota209
5. California.1
126 ~~-
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1. New York
334
6 f . Ponnsylvani
110
4. Ohio - x 3. N
150
Wh
This yea
8.loridamany fo
74 come frc

"TMki

Composite ACT
score

chusetts

Z4
14% -

lew Jersey
170

'27-32 '33+

L

Below 24 '24-27

1

10. Texas L-
50A

lo They Compute?
got a single first-year student told the Daily
1ey don't use a computer and most say
ev use both H3Ms and Macs.

ore are They From?
er's incoming class has students from all fifty states and
reign countries. The map shows how many students
om the top ten states and the three states that have only
esentative in the class.
Study Break
O'1Wtn the'gIlihr.arvily' d7isiur..'v'firs~t-vea>'r studehnts

one repr

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