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November 30, 1995 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-30

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waftt. . ~

Coaches salute Horn
Jason Horn, Michigan senior defensive lineman, was named to the
American Football Coaches Association All-American Team yesterday.
He is joined by four Big Ten opponents: running back Eddie George and
offensive lineman Orlando Pace, both of Ohio State, linebacker Pat
Fitzgerald of Northwestern, and offensive lineman Jeff Hartings of Penn
State. The Associated Press All-Americans will be announced Dec. 6.

Page 9A
Thursday,
November 30, 1995

'M'needs
to follow
Bulock s
example
By Paul Barger
Daily Sports Writer
MUNCIE, Ind.-The one truth about
the Michigan men's basketball team is
that it has been consistently inconsis-
tent.
Inexperience and high expectations
have led to lackluster play and disap-
pointing performances.
The Wolverines have simply not been
able to find the chemistry necessary to
become a successful team. Many of the
players have had individual moments
of brilliance, but as a unit Michigan has
shown very little.
Last night against Ball State, the
Wolverines jumped out to a 21-4 lead,
but an incredible amount of mental
mistakes allowed
the Cardinals to
stayin the contesto
throughout the1
first half. It
seemed that every
time down the
court a Michigan
player would
throw a bad pass
or get called for
travelling.
By the end of the evening the Wol-
yerines had amassed 34 turnovers.
This type of erratic play has to be
eliminated if the Wolverines expect to
contend for the Big Ten title.
It is clear that Steve Fisher's squad
has a long way to go and a lot of matur-
ing to do. Last night's victory was very
impressive, especially the defensive
effort, but it was over a Mid-American
Conference team that was playing in its
first game of the year.
Still, the defensive performance was
nothing short of outstanding. Michigan
held the Cardinals to 52 points on 28.6
percent shooting.
"We're pleased with how we played
on defense, but we are not satisfied,"
sophomore Jerod Ward said. "We have
to maintain that defensive intensity for
40 minutes. We have to keep playing
hard and playing good defensively."
Last night was a glimpse at how good
the Wolverines can be if they can com-
bine their intensity with intelligent de-
cision making.
Michigan has as much raw talent as
any team in the nation, but it must learn
f' keep its composure on the floor.
It often looks like Louis Bullock, a
freshman, is the only player on the team
that keeps his head about him for the
duration of the contest.
Bullock is quickly establishing him-
self as one of the top first-year players
in the nation, and his steady play may
be the key to Michigan's season.
He had another outstanding perfor-
mance last night and continues to make
believers out of both teammates and
opponents. Bullock tallied 14 points to
load Michigan, the fourth time this sea-
son he has accomplished that feat. He is
6-for-6 from beyond the 3-point arc in
his last two games.
' Stats alone do not tell the whole story.
Whenever the Wolverines need a bucket
or a stop on defense, it seems that Bul-
lock is instrumental.

The Laurel, Md., native is talented,
confident, aggressive and will only get
better with time and experience. After

Wolverine defense
smothers Ball State
Bullock, Traylor score 14 in 80-52 victory

By Barry Sollenberger
Daily Sports Editor
MUNCIE, Ind. - Ball State is squarely on the
nation's college basketball map.
The Cardinals have reached the NCAA Tourna-
ment three times and postseason play six of the
past seven years. Coach Ray McCallum's team
looks to compete for a spot in the tournament
again this season, as Ball State returns three start-
ers from a squad that reached the NCAAs last
March.
But while McCallum and company boast a solid
program, they learned a valuable lesson last night.
It's not wise to schedule a Big Ten power, such
as No. 24 Michigan, for your season opener.
"We were excited to have Michigan in here
(before) the game," McCallumsaid. "I don't know
about that now."
The Wolverines (4-2) blew out the Cardinals
(0-1), 80-52, in front of 11,500 angry fans. The
crowd expressed its displeasure with the lopsided
affair by tossing ice onto the floor midway through
the second half.
The home team was rewarded with a technical
foul.
It hardly mattered - Ball State was already
dead by that point, trailing 62-34.
The Cardinals looked like they were aiming at
anything but the basket all evening long and shot
just .286 from the field for the game.
"Michigan playing their (sixth game) and Ball
State playing their first game," Michigan coach
Steve Fisher said. "I think that definitely had an
impact."
Michigan buried Ball State with 66-percent
field-goal shooting on the night and fast starts to
both halves.
Leading 36-24 at intermission, the Wolver-
ines used a 15-2 run to start the second half.
Maurice Taylor's three-point play with just
under 15 minutes remaining put the game out of
reach at 51-26.
From then on, it was statistic-padding time for
Michigan.
The Wolverines' shooting percentage was the
sixth-best in school history. Freshmen Robert
Traylor and Louis Bullock each chipped in 14
points to lead five Wolverines in double figures,
and Michigan's height advantage down low en-
abled the Wolverines to almost double Ball State's
output on the boards, 46-24.

We were excitedsto
have Michigan in here
(before). I don't know
about that now.
- Ray McCallum
Ball State basketball coach
The only major disappointment for Michigan
came in the turnover department. The Wolver-
ines committed 34 miscues on the night - an
incredible number, considering the final score.
"I can't get over those 34 turnovers," Ball State's
Randy Zachary said. "They handed it to us and we
did not take advantage of it."
Even though the Cardinals were never in the
game, Fisher was not pleased with his squad's
generosity.
"We're not going to win many games turning it
over 17 times a half," Fisher said. "But I liked our
defense and think that if we can defend like we did
tonight, we'll have a chance to be a very good
team."
The start of the game was pivotal in the Wolver-
ines' romp.
Robert Traylor's turn-around jumper in the
lane gave the Michigan a 13-4 lead, and McCallum
was forced to call timeout just six minutes into the
game.
It didn't help.
Michigan's Louis Bullock hit a three and Travis
Conlan followed with one of his own 90 seconds
later. After a Cardinal miss, Dugan Fife banked in
a 15-footjumperand thelead was 21-4. McCallum
was forced to call time again with 11:40 left in the
half.
That did help. Momentarily.
LaSalle Thompson broke a 19-0 Wolverine run
with a pair from long range, but then Maceo
Baston connected on two foul shots and a layup in
the lane for Michigan. The Wolverines led, 28-12,
with 7:56 left before halftime.
Ball State closed to within nine, but could not
find the basket over the last 3:36 of the half, and
Michigan's lead was 36-24 at intermission.
"We were so caught up in Michigan being
here," McCallum said. "We were in anotherzone."

NOPPORN KICHANANTHA/Daily
Jerod Ward, shown here In Monday's game against St. Francis (Pa.), had 10 points In last night's 80-52
Michigan victory over Ball State. The Wolverines held the Cardinals to .286 shooting from the floor and
held a 46-24 edge in rebounds, but turned the ball over 34 times.

only six games he has established him-
self as Michigan's top scoring threat
from the perimeter and its most clutch
shooter.
Bullock is a leader on the floor and is
taking initiative that few freshmen
would be willing to take.
In the biggest game of his very young
career, Bullock single-handedly kept
Michigan in shouting distance of Ari-
zona. He showed nojitters at all, finish-
ing the game with 22 points.
Against Ball State he controlled the
tempo of the second half and put the
Wolverines in a position to put the
game away early.
Michigan's play on the perimeter,
suspect all last season, is rapidly be-
coming one of the team's strengths.
Sophomore Travis Conlan has clearly
stepped up his play, but Bullock is the
difference.
His ball control and decision mak-
ing, combined with his obvious ability
to shoot, may be exactly what the Wol-
verines have been looking for.
If the rest of the team can follow his
example and play intelligently and
within themselves, Michigan is going
to be tough to beat by the time the
conference season begins in January.

BALL STATE (52)
FQ FT REB
MIN MPA M 0A O-T A F PTS
Wells 29 5-16 3-7 2-5 5 3 13
Reed 31 2-7 041 4-6 1 2 4
Martin 23 1-3 0.0 2-3 1 4 2
Zachary 28 311 3-4 0-1 0 0 9
Norris 20 0-8 0-0 1.2 1 2 0
Johnson 17 1-3 0-0 1-2 1 1 2
Ray 1 0-0 0-0 00 00 0
Smith 8 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Thompson 25 5-10 2-2 0-0 1 0 16
Mason 12 2-7 0-0 3.4 1 1 4
Smith 6 0-2 0-0 0-000 0
Totals 200 2470 -14 14-24 1114 52
FG%: .286. FT%: .57 1. Three-point goals: 4-27,
.148 (Thompson 4-8, Smith 0-1, Zachary 0-3,
Wells 0-4, Mason 0-4, Norris 07). Blocks: 2
(Wells, Smith). Turnovers: 19 (Wells 8, Norris 6,
Martin 2, Mason 2, Reed). Steals: 8 (Wells 4,
Reed, Martin, Thompson). Technical Fouls:
Bench.
MICHIGAN (60)
MO FT RED
MIN M-A M-A O0T A F PTS
Mitchell 22 2-7 0-0 0-1 1 4 5
Taylor 20 5-8 1-3 1-7 2 2 11
Baston 18 4-4 5-6 1.6 0 2 13
Conlan 23 1-1 1-2 1-2 6 0 4
Bullock 19 4-4 3-4 0-4 3 0 14
DeKuiper 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Fife 26 2-2 0-0 0-4 14 5
Morton 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0
Oliver 3 0-0 0-0 1-2 0 0 0
Ward 23 4-8 1-4 1-7 1 2 10
White 19 2-5 0-2 1-3 3 0 4
Traylor 23 7-8 0-0 1-7 1 1 14
Totals 200 31-471.1-19 8-46 2.92.6 80
FG%: .660. FT%: .579. Three-point goals: 7-12,
.583 (Bullock 3-3, Conlan 1-1, Fife 1-1, Ward 1-
2, Mitchell 1-3, White 0-2). Blocks: 4 (White 2,
Mitchell, Traylor). Turnovers: 34 (White 8,
Conlan 6, Bullock 5, Ward 5, Taylor 4, Baston 3,
Traylor 2, Oliver). Steals: 3 (Baston, Conlan,
Traylor). Technical Fouls: none.
Ball State ........24 28 - 52
Michigan......36 44 - 80
At: University Arena; A: 11,500

U I

We invite all
University of Michigan Seniors
to get to know our people
and career opportunities
INVESTMENT BANKING
PRESENTATION
Tuesday, December 5, 1995
at 7.:00 p.m.
Pendleton Room

Top teams next for Blue women swimmers

By Chris Murphy
Daily Sports Writer
The schedule-maker must have been
crazy.
Today, the Michigan women's swim-
ming team faces off against Stanford,
Texas and Southern Cal, three teams that
are ranked in the nation's top 10.
Going into the season, the Michigan
was ranked No. 1. The Wolverines faced
an extremely tough slate of competition
throughout the early part of their season.
Instead of padding its record by taking
on lesser competition, Michigan have
chosen to take adecidedly different route.
This weekend's opponents includeNo. 1
Stanford, No.4 Texas and No.7 Southern
Cal.
Throughout the first two months,
Michigan has faced off against such na-

before."
If facing top-flight programs boosts
the team's ranking, then the Wolverines
should find themselves right on top after
this weekend.
The meet spans three days of long-
course events. The extended competition
should test the Wolverines' stamina. It
should also give Richardson an opportu-
nity to compare his team's training
progress against that of the three nation-
ally-ranked opponents.
Against Stanford, Michigan will be
looking at several familiar faces.
Three swimmers, Claudia Franco and
co-captains Lisa Jacob and Jane Skillman,
were instrumental in the Cardinal's de-
feat of the Wolverines in October.
Despite Stanford's success, Richardson
remains upbeatabout Michigan's chances

the difference. Michigan has been keep-
ing up a rigorous training schedule
throughout the fall. This usually results in
the team racing while fatigued.
But with the postseason in mind,
Richardson plans on retaining the same
training schedule that landed the team the
No. 2 spot in the nation at last year's
tourney.
"(Training hard) is what we did last
year at this time and we were successful
with it." Richardson said. "I see no reason
to change last year's plan."
Last year's plan also included the same
slate of nationally ranked opponents.
The schedule-maker has not changed
that either.
ITW T ~ TA1 e44 *0in

'I

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