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November 29, 1995 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-29

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10- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 29, 1995

Rose Bowl bid has Northwestern students talking tickets

The Associated Press
EVANSTON-There's only aweek
to go until final exams at Northwestern,
the school known for having the brains
cf the Big Ten. The buzz on campus,
lowever, isn't about tests, it's about
Rose Bowl tickets. And how to get
them.
With the once hapless Wildcats head-
ing to Pasadena for the first time in over
40 years, pigskin fever has hit with a
vengeance.
"Students are talking about football.
That hasn't happened in nearly 50
years," said John Paynter, the school's
director of bands who, as a student,
cheered on the Wildcats at their last
bowl appearance - the 1949 Rose
Bowl.

The campus bookstore had to add
more cash registers to handle all the
sales of Northwestern sweatshirts, hats,
pompons and T-shirts.
Vases of roses are plentiful around
suburban Evanston. University flags
flap in store windows.
Former students, including
Charlton Heston, Cindy Crawford
and Ann-Margret, have voiced their
support for the Wildcats on televi-
sion.
And on Monday, so many Califor-
nia-dreaming fans jammed the phone
lines to inquire about bowl tickets that
the university's voice mail system
broke. That was the first day the univer-
sity was open after Michigan's victory
over Ohio State handed the Wildcats

the Rose Bowl bid.
Mary Doi, asenior andself-described
fair-weather fan, was among those try-
ing to get tickets. "It's a once in a half-
century chance," she said.
Until this season, when the Wildcats
became the nation's favorite underdogs,
racking up a 10-1 record and capturing
the Big Ten championship, the average
SAT scores of Northwestern freshmen
was more often a source of pride than
the football team - especially during a
34-game losing streak between 1979
and 1982.
But this year's team was different,
and students started attending games
in droves - although this was the
first season they had to pay for tick-
ets.

Dyche Stadium, which seats 49,256,
sold out three times this year; the
school's last sellout was in 1983. In six
home games this season, 229,380 seats
were sold, compared to 171,909 last
year
Charles Chun, a senior, remembers
his reaction last spring when told he'd
have to pay for his tickets.
"I thought, 'Why should I have to
pay to go see us lose?"' he said,
smiling. "But it all worked out all
right."
As for those much-desired Rose Bowl
tickets, Northwestern will be allotted
21,904 at $80 each.
Priority will be given to season-ticket
holders, including student and faculty
season-ticket holders, as well as certain

university donors.
Amid the Rose Bowl rush, signs of
the old Northwestern were still evident
on campus. After all, this school of
7,400 undergraduates - the only pri-
vate university in a conference of giant
state schools - didn't earn the reputa-
tion as the brains of the Big Ten for
nothing.
Desks were filled at the campus li-
brary this week, and a sign announcing
late-night study hours in the student
center partially blocked a banner fea-
turing a giant red rose and the words:
"Expect Victory: Northwestern Foot-
ball."
"Students won't be forgetting their
studies. You can't do that at Northwest-
ern," said Paynter.

STATE
Continued from Page 9
Michigan shots including a beautiful
glove save on a point-blank slap shot by
John Madden.
The sophomore also stopped Bobby
Hayes on the doorstep during an odd-
man rush in the second. He finished
with 27 saves.
Michigan State went ahead, 3-2,
when Spartan left wing Taylor Clark
picked up a rebound and snuck the
puck under Turco, who was lying on
his back and trying to lift himself off
the ice.
Brendan Morrison thought he put the
Wolverines on top, 3-2, three minutes
into the second period but referee Jeff
Schell ruled that Morrison touched the
puck with his hand and waved off the
goal.
"Michigan is an explosive hockey
team," said Michigan State center Anson
Carter, who scored two goals on the
night. "If they get the jump on early,
there's no way you can stop them. So
we all got together and put our heads to
it and we just stuck with it. We played
well defensively."
Carter started off the scoring, pick.
ing up a loose puck in the Michigan
zone and sliding it between Turco's
pads on a Spartan power play for a 1-0
lead in the first period.
Freshman Sean Ritchlin tiedthe score
up, taking Legg's pass in the crease,
whirling around and sending a back-
handed shot past Alban at 13:59 of the
first period.
Michigan took a one-goal lead a
minute and a half later on Dale
Rominski's first collegiate goal. The
freshman picked up Harold Schock's
rebound in the slot and flipped a
wrist shot over Alban's left shoulder
on a delayed penalty to Michigan
State.
Carter evened the score up with 15
seconds left in the period, racing down
the right side and beating Turco be-
tween his pads again.
MICHIGAN STATE 4, MICHIGAN 3
Michigan 2 0 1-3
Michigan State 2 1 x1-4
First Period - 1, MSU, Carter 10 (Tuzzolino, Alban),
5:26 (pp). 2, UM, Ritchlin 2 (Legg), 13:42. 3, Rominski
1(Schock, Morrison),.15:07.4, MSU, Carter 11(Bogas,
Watt), 19:45. Penalties - Tuzzolino, MSU (roughing),
:39;Madden.MSU (roughing), :39; Keyes,.MSU (tripping),
2:26; Morrison, UM (interference), 3:50; Frescoin, UM
(holding), 7:09; Bogas, MSU (holding), 20:00
Second Period - 5, MSU, Clarke 4 (Kozakowski,
Slater);14:16 (pp). Penalties- Morrison, UM (tripping).
3:25, Watt. MSU (elbowing), 8:24; Harlton, MSU
(roughing), 9:06; Turco, UM (roughing), 12:58; Hayes,
MSU (high-sticking).
Third period-g6.UM, Morrison 6 (Luhning, Crozier),
1:59.7, MSU, Ferranti 6(ClarkeBogas),14:47. Penalties
- Tuzzolino, MSU (charging), 1:59; Fox, UM (tripping),
18:02.
Shots on goat - UM 14-6-10-30. MSU 5-5-9-19.
Power plays - UM 0 of 5; MSU 2 of 6 .
Goalie saves - UM, Turco 3-4-8-15. MSU, Alban 12-
6-9-27.
Referee - Jeff Schell
Unesnen - John Dobrelewski, John LaDuke.
At: Munn Ice Arena.
A: 6,729.
CARTER
Continued from Page 9
The Spartans' senior captain single-
handidly kept his squad alive in the
lopsided first period and was probably
the reason that the game's outcome
swung in their direction.
"When you talk about Anson
Carter, you talk about everything,"
Michigan State coach Ron Mason
said. "He's a great all-around player
in terms of what he does in the
lockerroom, in the community and
on the ice. He's just a pleasure to
have on a team. Tonight, he did it on
the ice in every way."
Carter jumped out of the starting
blocks after the first faceoff and made

sure that the game was tied when both
teams entered the lockerroom at the end
of the first period.
He notched the first score of the game
on a power-play goal. He dumped the
puck past Michigan goalie Marty Turco,
assisted by Tony Tuzzolino and Spar-
tan netminder Chad Alban. That goal
was his 10th of the season
"I'm a senior leader and captain of
this team," Carter said. "It's my job,
and all the other seniors on the team, to
get all the other guys going."
Carter's team was outplayed in the
first and found itself down 2-1 after
Dale Rominski notched the Wolver-
ines' second goal. Carter took over,
responding by racing down the right
side and drilling a shot past Turco with
15 seconds remaining in the period to
tie the score.
"He's an elite player," Michigan
coach Red Berenson said. "He's going
to have an impact on any game he plays
in. I don't think we underestimated his
speed, but maybe we didn't respect it.
He just blew by Steven Halko on (his
second) goal."
The second and third periods were
nothing like the first. The game became
more of an even battle because Carter's
play in the first got the ball rolling.
Taylor Clarke put Michigan State up 3-
2 at 14:16 of the second with a power
play goal and after that, the Spartans
never really looked back.

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