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November 17, 1995 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-17

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2-The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 17, 1995
Hillnears agreement on HUD, VA,

EPA bi-s; White H

The Washington Post
WASHINGTON-House and Senate
negotiators resolvedthdirdifferences yes-
terday over an $80.3 billion bill funding
veterans, housing, space and environ-
mental agenciesemploying some 300,000
government workers.
But even with Republicans dipping
into a newfound $1.1 billion collection
of money to add back some of the funds
cut earlier from the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency and the Housing and
Urban Development Department, White
House sources signaled that the spend-
ing bill was still unacceptable. "Isee no
indication that we've had a huge break-
through," said one official.
If President Clinton were to sign the

measure, which appropriates money
through next September, furloughed
workers at the agencies it covers could
return to work.
On the Republican side, the desire to
accommodate the administration was tem-
pered by anger at resistance to GOP poli-
cies from some agencies. The conferees
sent what they called a "strong message"
of displeasure to Veterans Affairs Secre-
tary Jesse Brown in the form of sharp cuts
in his office's staffand travel budget. The
cuts had not been included in versions of
the bill passed earlier this year by the
House and Senate.
Sen. Christopher S. Bond (R-Mo.)
said he was incensed at reports that
Brown had spread "falsehoods" about

louse S nl
GOP plans for veterans through e-mail issued by t
and messages affixed to employees' Confere
pay stubs. "The secretary has done ev- all EPA acc
erything in his power to block every the 1995 a
effort of Congress to bring the VA into ence and t
the 21st century," said Bond, who chairs fund envir
the subcommittee that drafts the appro- tories and
priations measure. gressionalc
Asked ifhe might relent on the cuts to million, as
Brown's office, Bond said, "Maybe in a House and
year." versions o
Brown called the action "a mean- The con
spirited attempt to undermine my abil- lion for the
ity to do my job." cleanup pr
Nevertheless, the conferees insulated the 1995 1
the major veterans programs from their enforceme
personal ire. VA medical research pro- $1.5 billio
grams received $257 million, the full Observe
amount that Brown had requested. And tween Bon
medical care was allocated $16.6 bil- mittee Cha
lion, an increase from 1995 and only N.Y.) fore
slightly less than Brown wanted. day to app
The overall measure has been under off the ev
intense fiscal and ideological pressure income ter
all year, with budget cutters targeting ernment-a
housing and environmental accounts The Bo
for big savings, and House conserva- ated budge
tives attaching legislative riders to it to Federal Ho
curb EPA's alleged regulatory excesses. alternativ
As expected after recent House votes against m
registering rising concern among GOP $1.1 billio
moderates over the party's environmen- available t
tal image, Republican conferees confereest
dropped most of the riders. But they lion in one
retained one provision that removes to keep th
EPA's power to veto wetlands permits properties,

i
i

a veto

i i

the Army Corps of Engineers.
es settled on $5.7 billion for
counts, a 14-percent cut from
amount of $6.6 billion. Sci-
echnology accounts, which
onmental research in labora-
colleges in dozens of con-
districts, were allocated $525
substantial increase over the
Senate allowances in earlier
f the bill.
ferees added back $160 mil-
Superfund hazardous waste
ogram, bringing it closer to
level. But management and
nt programs were funded at
n, a deep cut from 1995.
ers credited a side deal be-
d and Senate Banking Com-
airman Alfonse D'Amato (R-
nabling the conferees yester-
rove a step that could stave
iction of thousands of low-
nants from subsidized, gov-
ssisted housing units.
nd-D'Amato maneuver cre-
tary savings, by allowing the
using Administration to seek
es to costly foreclosures
ortgagees in default. Some
n of the savings were made
o Bond's panel, enabling the
to authorize up to $624 mil-
-time payments to landlords,
hem from refinancing their
raising the rents and evict-
come tenants who then could
afford to pay.

p FlkN lUlEI /U UIF1E1 HId tortt .., ALL SCREENSSThREO

I

SNATIONAL REPORT OR
Parkinson's disease won't slow Reno
WASHINGTON -With medication controlling the shak-
ing of her left hand, Attorney General Janet Reno says her
newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease will neither force her
from office nor cease her long weekend walks along the
Potomac River.
"I feel.fine now. I continue to take my long walks," the 57-
year-old attorney general said at her weekly news conference
yesterday. "I don't feel like I have any impairment. I feel
strong and feel like moving ahead."
She has "an excellent, long-term prognosis," her doctor,
Jonathan Pincus, a neurology professor at Georgetown Uni-
versity Medical Center, said at a later news conference. "Her Reno
mild tremor was completely eliminated with modest doses,"
of medication, he said.
Reno disclosed that she was diagnosed three weeks ago with the progressive
disease that undermines muscle control. Doctors assured her that, like hundreds of
thousands of other Americans with Parkinson's, she could continue working
without impairment.

MIGHTY
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Park worker may be
punished for working
TRAVERSE CITY- A national park
superintendent might be disciplined for
his refusal to stop working despite the
federal government's partial shutdown,
his supervisor said yesterday.
Bill Fink, who runs the Keweenaw
National Historical Park in Michigan's
Upper Peninsula, said he would con-
tinue defying orders to stay away. But
he has stopped urging other federal
employees to join his "work-in."
"I'm continuing to try to see that I
take care of my work, my job and my
customers," Fink said.
"I feel very strongly about this com-
mitment, about making my statement,
saying that I care. I did this knowing
that I was going far out on a limb and
that there might be profound personal
consequences."
Fink's job is not in jeopardy and no
decision has been made to punish him,
said Bill Schenk, director of the Na-
tional Park Service's field office in
Omaha, which has jurisdiction over the
Keweenaw park.
But Schenk said he was reviewing
the matter and that disciplinary action

m = "9

i

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firee
a

KAPLAN Educational Center presents:
So You Want to Be A Doctor?
Join us
at 337 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor
7:00-9:00 pm
Wednesday, November 15th
Call 1-800-KAP-TEST to reserve your spot
and GET AN EDGE ON THE COMPETITION!
get a higher score
NK APL1A N

Secrets o the
H-e art
An 'Evening of Sufi
'Music and Chanting
Saturday, November 18,
8:oop.m. at Rack/iam
Auditorium., Ann Arbor
'rraditiona(:Moroccan :Music of
the lenowa 'Tariqat
'Myst ic poetry va mfsongjirom
.India andJak istait
NWagshbandi Sufi chanting
'Pencak Sifat "SenJdonesian
Suji art fnovement
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Today's your last
chance to help
UM beat OSU!
Give Blood!
Michigan Union 9-6.30
Religous
Services
AVAVAVAVA
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH
Lutheran Campus Ministry (ELCA)
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
Sunday WorshipL10AM
Wednesday Evening Prayer 7PM
Thurs. "Listening for God" 7PM
Friday Free Movies 7PM
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH.
Contemporary worship services at
9:00 am and 12 Noon on Undy.
Bible study for students at 10:30 am.
2580 Packard Road. 971-0773. Small-Group
bible studies and student activities weekly.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division 663-0518
(2 blocks north and 1 block west
of intersection of Huon and State)
SUNDAY: Eucharists - 8a.m. and 10a.m.
Adult education - 9a.m.
Call for weekday service times,
to get on mailing list,
or if you have questions.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near H-ill
SATURDAY: Worship 6:30 p.m.
SUNDAY: Worship 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Ed Krauss 663-5560

I

ing low-in
no longera

might be forthcoming. He declined to
speculate on what might be done.
"We certainly have to have a better
dialogue about what's expected-of him
as a superintendent in times of closure,"
Schenk said.
Doctor to examine
Freeman brothers
ALLENTOWN, Pa. - A judge has
ordered two brothers accused of killing
their parents and brother to be exam-
ined by a psychiatrist hired by prosecu-
tors, so they can prepare to rebut a
potential insanity defense.
The defense and prosecution wrapped
up three days of pretrial hearings for
David Freeman, 16, and Bryan Freeman,
17, on Wednesday by outlining issues
that have to be settled before their triple-
homicide trial begins in January.
The Freeman brothers are accused of
killing their mother, Brenda; their fa-
ther, Dennis; and their 1l-year-old
brother, Eric, in their Salisbury Town-
ship home in February.
The brothers then fled with a cousin
to Hope, Mich., a tiny commuiity north
of Midland in the central part of the
state, where they were arrested.
0.
scription on oneis missing several letters,
but is believed to read "Hasmonean,''
another name for the clan.
"This is the first time the word
Hasmonean has been foundon archaeo-
logical evidence," Riklin said.
Former South Korean
president arrested
SEOUL - Former President Roh
Tae-woo was arrested yesterday on
charges of accepting multimillion-dol-
lar bribes from the country's biggest
businessmen in exchange for govern-
ment contracts.
Locked in a cell in a jail outside the
capital, the man credited with some of
South Korea's biggest diplomatic suc-
cesses has become the nation's most
famous prisoner.
Rob, whose name is pronounced
"No," is the first former South Korean
president to face legal action for deeds
committed while in office. Ifconvicted,
he could face 10 years to life in prison.
As court officials took him tojail, the
62-year-old former army general
struggled to keep his composure and
said: "To our people, I'm really sorry.
I'm ready for any punishment."
- From Daily wire services

Workers find Jewish
tribe's tombs in Israel
MACCABIM, Israel - A tractor
leveling ground for a new highway
broke open a 2,000-year-old burial
cave believed used by the Maccabees,
a tribe of Jewish warriors whose re-
volt is celebrated in the festival of
Hanukkah.
Excited archaeologists showed off
their dusty find yesterday - the first
physical evidence of the Maccabees,
known until now only from ancient
Jewish writings.
"This is the first time that archaeolo-
gists have evidence that there really
was this family," said site director
Shimon Riklin, as workers in hard hats
cleared away sand that has covered the
cave for nearly two millennia.
The cave was discovered Monday by
workers building a highway 19 miles
northwest of Jerusalem. It includes an
entrance courtyard and three small burial
chambers built ofchalk blocks, in which
archaeologists found 24 stone boxes, or
ossuaries, containing the bones of the
dead.
The ossuaries are inscribed in Hebrew
with Jewish names, Riklin said. The in-

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Opera Production
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Digital Music Ensemble
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Michigan Youth Ensembles
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EDITORS: Jonathan Berndt, Lisa Dines. Andrew Taylor, Scot Woods.
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