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November 14, 1995 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-14

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E

IOCKILISTAIrt

Student
eeded
y Soumya Mohan
r the Daily
Ask not for whom the bell tolls. Ask
ho is tolling the bells.
Anyone interested might want to ask
out 'tolling the bells of the Burton
ower's Charles Baird Carillon, the
iird-heaviest such instrument in the
orld.
Margo Halsted, the University's
rillonist since 1987, is looking for at
ast three more students to study caril-
n in the winter term.
She insists that playing the bells is
robably the most fun activity on cam-
us. "It's great to go wild on the bells,"
e said.
Halsted said candidates need to have
good piano background. They also
eed to be able to read music well and
ave good rhythm.
"Once they are in, I'm sure they'll
ve it, as I do," said Halsted, an assis-
nt professor of campanology in the
usic School.
Engineering junior Matthew White
currently taking carillon study for
ne credit. He said he plays at least one
our a day on practice keyboards.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 14, 1995 -7
Faculty postpone
vote on revised
grievance rules

B. DAMIAN CAP/Daily
Margo Halsted plays the carillon In Burton Tower.

By Stephanie Jo Klein
Daily Staff Reporter
After three years of debate, proposed
changes to the University's faculty
grievance procedures will have to wait
at least another three months.
The faculty's Senate Assembly sent
the proposal to a working committee
yesterday. George Brewer, who chairs
the Senate Advisory Committee on Uni-
versity Affairs, saidthe committee would
consider points of concern raised at
yesterday's meeting and bring a revised
document to the assembly's February
meeting.
The new grievance procedure, if ap-
proved in its current form, would give
faculty the right to bring their problems
before a Grievance Review Board, pro-
viding final judgment on issues of ten-
ure and salary.
SACUA member and Physiology
Prof. Louis D'Alecy called the post-
poned vote "madness," since the policy
has been debated for so long.
D'Alecy made a motion that the as-
sembly endorse the new model as a"start-
ing document" to "initiate discussion with
the University administration aimed at
developing a mutually agreeable griev-

ance procedure."
Several members continued to voice
objections to the document's wording,
paying special attention to terms like
"binding" and "binding arbitration."
Social Work Prof. Sheila Feld pre-
sented a list of seven recommendations
and possible amendments to the docu-
ment, which led others to further criti-
cize the policy.
D'Alecy notedthat there are 78 mem-
bers of the assembly, adding that he had
counted at least 15 individual points.
"If we were to debate the content of
each person's problems, it would take
up the rest of the assembly's time for
the year," he said.
In presenting her long list, D'Alecy
said, Feld has "effectively torpedoed
the process."
D'Alecy's motion was dismissed when
electrical engineering and computer sci-
ence Prof. Ronald Lomax moved to refer
the discussion of the document to the
newly appointed committee.
Lomax said Feld, Kinesiology Prof.
Pat Maloy and retired Mathematics Prof.
Wilfred Kaplan would work with the
current members of the SACUA griev-
ance committeeto considerall viewpoints.

"It's definitely a good way to get
away from hard-core academics., yet
something very different from anything
I've ever done before," he said.
The carillon keyboard is in a small
room in the center of the bell cibam-
ber and is played using the
carillonist's loosely closed fists and
the feet.
By the summer of 1996, Halsted said
she will be looking for new people to
play the bells slated to be installed in
the bell tower being constructed on

North Campus.
On the carillon in Burton Tower,
Halsted plays a wide variety of mu-
sic.
"It depends on how I feel that day,
sometimes it even depends on the
weather," she said.
Halsted plays every noon for half an
hour and on most Saturday mornings,
for announced recitals and for special
events.
She has played carillon recitals in
several different countries and holds

degrees in music from Stanford Uni-
versity and the University of Califor-
nia-Riverside, as well as a diploma from
the Netherlands Carillon School.
Of the 55 bells, the largest, which
strikes the hour, weighs 12 tons. The
smallest bells weighs 21 pounds. The
bells are stationary, hung on a steel
framework.
The carillon was developed in the
low countries of Europe - now Hol-
land, Belgium and northern France -
in the 15th and 16th centuries.

r

Arts council awards $17M in grants

University Musical
Society receives
$100,000
LANSING (AP) - Michigan cul-
tural institutions, faced with a 27 per-
cent drop in state funds, learned yester-
day who won and who lost in the latest
round of arts funding.
The $17 million allocated yesterday
by the state Council for the Arts and
Cultural Affairs is part of a $21.9 mil-
lion appropriation from the Legislature
to support arts and cultural programs in
the fiscal year that started Oct. 1.
The arts grants are down $8 million
-almost 27 percent-from last year's
budget, according to the Senate Fiscal
Agency. Last year, $29.9 million was
provided.
Among the 'organizations that re-
ceived funding this year, the University
Musical Society received $100,000.

Gov. John Engler recommended no
change from last year, but state lawmak-
ers trimmed the amount to be awarded.
Who got the money, and in what amounts,
was left up to the state council.
Engler praised those who got the state
grants.
"I'm impressed with the important
role these organizations play in enhane-
ing the quality of life, in stimulating the
economy, in creating jobs, in revitaliz-
ing our communities and in providing
outreach services and educational op-
portunities," Engler said.
"The vast range from museums to art
institutions to zoos to orchestras to the-
aters enables virtually every Michigan
citizen and visitor to experience one or
more of the state's many cultural offer-
ings," he said.
The grants fall into two programs -
state anchor organizations and Council
partnerships.

The first are professionally directed
arts and cultural organizations which
bring recognition to the state, increase
the state's competitive position and set
standards for their field, the council
said in a statement.
The partnerships pass through state
dollars to the local level and provide
programs and services to Council cli-
ents. They include the Arts Foundation
of Michigan, Cranbrook Academy of
Art, Michigan Corporation for Public
Broadcasting, Midland Center for the
Arts and Wayne State University.
All grants require a match of rev-
enues or donations from other public
and private sources, according to the
Council.
About$2millionofthe$21.9million
program was awarded to arts and cul-
tural organizations in September. The
remaining money will be awarded in
March 1996, it said.

1

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Announces the arrival of the
1995-96 University of Michigan
WHO: All interested persons...
WHAT: Salary Supplement
WHEN: November 16, 1995 (8:30 aign.-5 p.m.)
until they're gone!
WHERE: 420 Mlaynard, 2nd floor
WHY: Because: people want to know!
And the cost Is the same as last year:
ONLY $6.00!
Mark your cailendars... or better yet, use
the convenient mail-order form below!
(Please, no canmpus-mail orders.)
I E nr L t A 1W eu C1IE ECKIT U A P.fDCL"D .f'AD AA

MEDICATION RESEARCH STUDY:
If you are a healthy.,18-50 year old, male or female (post-menopausal or
surgically sterilized) and your weight is between 110 and 220 pounds,
you may qualify for a medication research study.
You must not have a history of: You must not:
" Ulcers " Take daily prescription medications
" Allergies to Aspirin or Ibuprofen * Work the 11 pm to 7 am shift
Payment for completing this study is $1,772.95.
For more information, please call Ann or Liz at (313) 996-7051,
Mon. - Fri., 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis, Community Research Clinic,
2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105.
In 1994 Coretta Scott King and the Martin Luther King Federal Holiday Commission challenged the country to
honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by celebrating MLK Day through participation in community service. In response
to this challenge, the U-M MLK Symposium Planning Committee and Project SERVE developed a program called
"Acting On The Dream". The program is designed to provide U-M students, faculty and staff an opportunity to
participate in community service projects at agencies throughout Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Detroit.
Planning is underway for the second annual "Acting on the Dream" that will yet again be a featured program of the
MLK Symposium scheduled for Monday, January 15. This year's service component compliments the Symposium
theme "Affirmation Through Action: The Challenge Continues".
If you are interested in participating in "Acting on the Dream", please fill out the form below and return it by Friday,
November 17. If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Jeff Howard at Project SERVE
(3-3548) or Michael Jones-Coleman at the Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives (6-1055).
YES, I will participate in "Acting on the Dream" on Monday, January 15, 1996 from 1:00-6:00 pm
Name:
Address:
Phone:
email:

Sex (optional) please circle:
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Race/Ethnicity (optional) please circle:
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ian-American
ther

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