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July 20, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2009-07-20

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uvuuay, Juy au, UUy
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE ARTISTIC KIND

Darth Cheney:
American hero
Even if you hate the
former vice president,
you love hating him
SEE PAGE 5
Sweaters with
a purpose
Lisa Anne Auerbach
displays her unique
apparel at UMMA
SEE PAGE 9
The Daily Dozen
Daily Sports breaks down
12 Wolverines who are
under the radar in '09-10
SEE PAGE 11
Vol. CXIX,No.145C, 2009TheMichiganDaily
michigandailycom
NEW S ....................... 2
O PIN IO N .............................. 4
CLASSIFIED ........................... 6
ARTS......................... 9
SPORTS ....... . . .... 11

People surround a sculpture by artist Marc Sijan at the Ann Arbor Art Fair on Friday. The ultra-realistic bodies are created by
through a six-month process of casting live people followed by the application of varnish and oil paint for the skin tones. The fair
lasted four days and brought in about 500,000v isitors.
Record applicants to U

Many'
faculty
toretire
Report finds that 50
percent of faculty
can retire by 2013
BySTEPHANIE STEINBERG
Daily News Editor
In a presentationto theUniver-
sity Board of Regents on Thurs-
day, Frederick Askari, chair of
the Committee of the Economic
Status of the
Faculty and a NOTEBOOK
clinical associ-
ateprofessorofinternalmedicine,
said approximately 50 percent of
the University's faculty will be
eligible for retirement by 2013.
Askari and his committee
studied benefits and salaries of
employees at the University's
Ann Arbor campus.
The survey reported that the
University may face a challenge
in recruitment and retention due
to an increase in retirement of
University employees.
Askarisaidtheissueisanation-
wide trend, which is a result ofthe
baby boom generation approach-
ing retirement years.
He added that increase in
retirement may cause problems
in maintaining faculty salary
and benefits at their current level
without an additional cost to the
University.
"Salary and benefits need to
keep pace with our peer institu-
tions in order to be competitive in
this arena," Askari'said.
See REGENTS, Page 2

Cla
a
stl

The
July 1:
row it
of app
admis
specti
2009-
increa
year.
Fro
14,918
Arbor

iss of 2013 to have But of those admitted, only 43.2
percent sent in enrollment depos-
tbout 200 more its, as comparedto the 48.2 percent
who did so at this time last year.
udents than 2012 Based on trends from previous
years regarding the percentage of
By JAMIE BLOCK applicants who send in deposits
Editor in Chief and ultimately enroll, the Universi-
ty projects that the incoming class
University announced on of 2013 will consist of around 5,900
3 that for the third year in a students - an increase from the
received a record number class of 2012 of about 200 students.
lications for undergraduate University Provost Teresa Sul-
Sion. A pool of 29,939 pro- livan said in an interview in May
ve freshmen applied for the that the University did not know
2010 academic year - an what to expect regarding enroll-
se of 133 from the previous ment numbers due to the unstable
economy.
m this pool of applicants, "This has been a very hard year
were admitted to the Ann to predict because there's so much
campus as of June 8, 2009. financial insecurity," she said.

Sullivan said the University
accepted more students than
planned to make up for "summer
melt" - when students pay enroll-
ment deposits but do not attend the
University in the fall.
"After talking with people at
other universities we think that we
will have more summer melt than
usual this year," she said.
Sullivan said one reason for
summer melt is that students on
a waitlist for another school will
sometimes attend that institution
if they're admitted during the sum-
mer, thereby causing the Univer-
sity's class size to shrink.
"So what we actually think is
that we'll have the same size class
next fall that we had last fall, but
See ENROLLMENT, Page 8

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