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June 29, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2009-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MOONWALKING IN MEMORIAM

Unaffordable,
unacceptable
The Board of Regents's
yearly tuition hike is one
tradition students would
be better off without
SEE PAGE 4
"Secret Life"
can't get real
ABC Family sitcom is
grossly implausible
SEE PAGE 9
SPORTS
Palushaj's Path
to Peoria
Former Wolverine hockey
player Aaron Palushaj is
willing his way to the NHL
SEE PAGE 11
-
Vo.CIN.142 C' 2oo9 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com
N EW S ................................. 2
O PINIO N ............................ 4
CLASSIFIED ....................... 6
A RTS ................................ ... 9
SPORTS ............................ 11

Brian Woolridge, known as the "Liberty Street Dancer," performs a tribute dance to the late pop icon Michael Jackson in Graffiti
Alley on Liberty Street on Sunday. Woolridge, who has been dancing to Jackson Sand Michael Jackson songs since 1995, said
Jackson's recent death has been difficult to handle, but that he plans to continue performing. "It's been rough, but he's such an
inspiration of mine," Woolridge said. "I don't plan on ever stopping." For more coverage, go to MichiganDaily.com.
Titiono terise

veekly Summer iEditon
SCH OLA RSHIP FUNDS
Student
aid In
danger
State may erase
Promise Scholarship
By STEPHANIE STEINBERG
Daily News Editor
Michigan college students
could be forced into an even more
difficult financial situation - one
that already includes increasing
tuition rates for the state's pub-
lic universities and an economic
recession - if the government
passes a bill to eliminate the
Michigan Promise Scholarship.
The state House of Represen-
tatives is currently reviewing
the hill, which would eliminate
funding for the Promise Schol-
arship - a $t40,000 merit-hosed
scholarship distributed to more
than 96,000 college students in
Michigan.
The Promise Scholarship was
created in December 2006 when
Gov. Jennifer Granholm signed
it into law. By passing a certain
level on the Michigan Merit
Exam or successfully completing
two years of postsecondary edu-
cation, students attending college
in Michigan could receive up to
$4,000 in tuition aid from the
grant.
But, in an attempt to cut down
the state's estimated $1.7 bil-
lion budget deficit for the fiscal
year that starts Oct. 1, the Senate
Appropriations Subcommittee on
Higher Education passed a bill
that calls for an end to the schol-
See SCHOLARSHIP, Page 2

Students will pay
additional $622 in
annual tuition
By LARA ZADE
Managing NewsEditor
In a rare 6-2 vote, the University
Board of Regents passed a 5.6-per-
cent tuition rate increase for both
in-state and out-of-state University
undergraduates for the 2009-2010
academic year at its June 18 meet-
ing.
The rate increase will bring the
annual cost of tuition to $11,659 for
in-state undergraduates in the Col-
lege of Literature, Science and the

Arts and $34,937 for out-of-state
undergraduates.
The tuition rate figure repre-
sents a $622 increase in annual
tuition for an in-state undergradu-
ate and an additional $1,868 for an
out-of-state undergraduate.
The regents also approved a 5.6-
percent increase for students in the
Rackham School of Graduate Stud-
ies, a 6.7-percent increase for stu-
dents attending the University of
Michigan-Dearborn and a 6.5-per-
cent increase for the Flint campus.
University Provost Teresa Sul-
livan described the increase -
which is the same as last year's rate
increase for in-state and out-of-
state undergraduate students - as
modest compared to other public
institutions in the Big Ten.

"This represents an average rate
of growth and tuition that's been
among the lowest of public univer-
sities in Michigan and also in the
Big Ten," Sullivan said.
Not all public institutions have
approved tuition rates for under-
graduatestudentsforthe2009-2010
academic year. But, Michigan State
University approved a rare two-
year budget plan, which includes
a 5.2-percent tuition increase for
the upcoming academic year and
a 4.9-percent increase for the next
academic year.
If MSU receives federal stimulus
dollars, the tuition rate increase for
this fall could be reduced to about
2.5 percent.
Additionally, Ohio State Univer-
See TUITION HIKE, Page 8

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