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June 19, 2014 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2014-06-19
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Thursday, June 19, 2014
The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
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&TH FRI OCKM

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Sminer Edition 'Mihianoailycom

Ann Arbor. MI

ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY FOUR YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Thursday. June 19.2014

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RESEARCH
'U' joins technology
consortium, examines
online ed. prospects

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily
Graham Glasgow pled guilty to a lesser charge Monday after a March 15 incident.
Glasgow pleads guilty
to lesser misdemeanor

- A2_x
SF

JUNE -

TOroboe Shorty
in. Olenns Au enue
NPR's Ask Me Another
Robert Cray &
M vis Staples
The C pitot Steps
- Disoouer
Toe at
A2SF.org

City amends OWI
to operating while
visually impaired,
sentencing July 14
By JAKE LOURIM
ManagingSports Editor
Redshirt junior offensive line-
man Graham Glasgow appeared in
Ann Arbor District Court Monday
for an operating while intoxicated
charge and pled guilty to the lesser
charge of operating while visually
impaired.
Glasgow was arraigned June
2 and plead not guilty to the OWI
charge from a March 15 incident.
The city amended the charge Mon-
day to operating while visually
impaired, a misdemeanor punish-
able by up to 93 days in jail and a
fine of up to $350. Glasgow will be
sentenced July 14 at 10 a.m.
Judge Joseph Burke presid-
ed over the hearing and asked
Glasgow for details about the night
of March 15, when he was pulled
over by Ann Arbor police officer
Patrick Maguire. Maguire pulled
over Glasgow's Chevrolet Subur-
ban when he noticed that there
was a passenger hanging out the
window shouting at pedestrians,
according to the police report.
At the hearing, Glasgow con-
firmed most of the details - the
only exception being the amount
he had to drink. According to the

police report, Glasgow told police
that night he had consumed five
light beers since about 3 p.m. In
court Monday, Glasgow revised
that estimate to 10 to 12 beers. He
reaffirmed that he started at 4 p.m.
at his house, then later took a nap
and drove to New York Pizza Depot
around 9 p.m.
"I was at my house. I started
probably sometime around 4,"
Glasgow told the judge. "I had -
I'm not quite sure how much - 10
to 12 would probably be my rough
estimate."
Glasgow's blood-alcohol con-
centration was .11 on the spot and
.13 at the police station later.
Glasgow's attorney, John A.
Shea, asked that Glasgow be able
to go home to Illinois to visit his
parents from Wednesday through
Monday during a break in foot-
ball training. The judge originally
adjourned the pretrial hearing
from June 2 on the condition that
Glasgow not leave the state or drink
alcohol.
The judge allowed Glasgow to
go home Wednesday but upheld
the condition that he not drink
alcohol.
"You understand that no alco-
hol means no alcohol," Burke said,
"even if your family is having alco-
hol."
The judge released Glasgow on
a $1,000 personal-recognizance
bond. The Aurora, Illinois native
has been suspended for the team's
season opener Aug. 30 against
Appalachian State.

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Nation's first female
delegate discusses
experience in
international politics
By HILLARY CRAWFORD
Daily StaffReporter
The Center for the Education
of Women hosted the Ambas-
sador of Botswana to the United
States, Tebelelo Mazile Seretse,
on Wednesday to facilitate a more
international focus in the depart-
ment.
Seretse, who became ambassa-
dor in February 2011, is Botswana's
first female ambassador. Prior to
her current position, she served in

Her Excellency Tebelelo Mazile Seretse, the Botswana ambassador to the US, speaks about her home country, democracy,
and the power of women at Hatcher Graduate Library Wednesday.
B otswana ambassador
talks relations overseas

Botswana's Parliamentary cabinets
from 1999 to 2004, holding vari-
ous positions including Minister
of Trade and Industry, Minister of
Wildlife and Tourism and Minister
of Works, Transport, and Commu-
nication.
During her time on Cabinet, she
successfully facilitated stronger
relations with the United States as
she negotiated a partnership agree-
ment with Washington to establish
an International Law Enforcement
Academy in Botswana. Addition-
ally, Seretse pushed for Botswana's
inclusion in the Africa Growth
Opportunity Act to increase trade
with the United States.
In addition to legislature, Ser-
etse also has experience in the pri-
vate sector as an entrepreneur and
director of her family's business,

Diragake Ltd, an oil company in
Botswana.
In her address, Seretse said
because she has experience in
both the public and private sec-
tors, she believes there are higher
expectations of her as ambassador.
She added that such expectations
reflect the success of her nation
in the past decades since it gained
independence from the United
Kingdom.
Seretse primarily emphasized
the heterogeneity within Africa
and criticized many Americans'
conflicting tendency to refer to the
continent as one would to a coun-
try.
Monica Porter, assistant
vice chancellor of student suc-
cess and director of the Office of
See BOTSWANA, Page 2

Partnership includes
four schools, allows
for connectivity and
collaboration
By IAN DILLINGHAM
Editor in Chief
In the 19th century, the stan-
dard gauge rail, which set the
standard width of rail tracks in
the United States and other coun-
tries, allowed an unparalleled
level of cooperation between the
railway companies, engineers and
businesses. Before the implemen-
tation, trains could only travel
as far as their company had laid
track. Now, they had the oppor-
tunity to travel across the coun-
try on tracks operated by several
companies - all working to stan-
dardize rail construction in the
industry.
Currently, research universi-
ties face similar difficulties on a
digital front. As data is produced
at an incredible rate and dis-
charged into databases, they face
the challenge of making sure it is
stored, protected and utilized in
the best way possible.
To address that, the University
announced last week it would join
the Unizin consortium, a partner-
ship between the University and
three other institutions: Indi-
ana University, Colorado State
University and the University of
Florida.
Unizin's mission is "to support

faculty and universities by ensur-
ing that universities and their fac-
ulty stay in control of the content,
data, relationships, and reputa-
tions that (they) create," accord-
ing to their website.
The consortium will allow
greater connectivity between
data at these institutions. Much
like the standard gauge rail, it
will-set the rules by which data is
collected and distributed among
research scientists, professors,
students and the general public.
Information Prof. James Hil-
ton, dean of the University librar-
ies, led the movement to get the
University involved in the part-
nership.
"(Unizin) is about leveraging
open standards to make sure con-
tent and data can flow between
tools and systems, rather than
remaining locked up inside a sin-
gle tool," Hilton said. "It's about
tiltingthe table in favor ofinterop-
erability and University control."
For a practical example, Hilton
said online practice quizzes, like
those currently offered on CTools,
could be adapted to better suit the
needs of students and instructors.
Rather than just simply having
professors assign problems and
receive scores, the data could be
used to improve course curricu-
lum.
"There's data in there that
would tell us - tell you - the kind
of problems that you're struggling
with and the kind of problems that
you're not," Hilton said. "Right
now, all that stays very isolated."
See TECHNOLOGY, Page 3
INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. III ©2014 The Michigan Daily
sALcoors, 5it...a0onm h5,~g, ,
NEWS .........................2
OPINION......................4
ARTS...........................7
CLASSIFIEDS .................8
CROSSWORD ................8
SPORTS..............10

I

0"
* -

N EWS
Summer festival
The yearly tradition kicked
off Friday with indoor and
outdoor performances.
> SEE PAGE 6

OPINION
Love over fear
Harleen Kaur talks
catcalling and why it's a
problem in major cities,
>> SEE PAGE 5

ARTS
GoT steps up
'Game of Thrones' Season
4 finale will certainly
satisfy, excite fans
>> SEE PAGE 9

SPORTS
Leaders and Best
Greg Garno hands out this
year's Schefters, honoring
University athletes.
>> SEE PAGE 10

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