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April 23, 1991 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-23

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The Michigan Daily -- Tuesday, April 23, 1991 - Pae 9
There's nothing wrong with being sexy

by Kristin Palm

As part of MTV's oh-so-informa-
tive "Sex in the '90s" series, two
nights ago the channel aired their 20
Sexiest Videos. In an ironic twist on
a joke that was funny in Spinal Tap
but wasn't so funny Sunday night, a
friend felt compelled to ask me the
following question after viewing
the videos for approximately 30
seconds: "Did they say sexiest
videos or sexist videos?"
Yup, the station that inundates
viewers with testimony to how hip
and progressive they are (and
they've got the post-modern com-
mercials to prove it) stands right on
the edge of tomorrow with their in-
terpretation of sexy. What's got me
so peeved, you ask?
Well, first of all, any video that
features Steven Tyler is immedi-
ately dubbed inherently un-sexy in
my book. Yet Aerosmith's "Love in
an Elevator" was right up there
with Mbtley Crue's "Girls Girls
Girls" and David Lee Roth's
"California Girls."

Couldn't have been all the
voluptuous women in bikinis and
hot pants could it? No, this is Sex in
the '90s. MTV wouldn't tout such
trite depictions of women as sexy in
this day and age now, would they?
Besides, they included Madonna
videos (two of 'em!) which really
proves they're progressive.
Especially since, with all the truly
sexy videos she's made, they chose
one where she acts as a peep show
dancer and another where she laps
milk up off the floor.
Hanging out with a panel of ex-
perts, as I always do, we nicknamed
this special segment Top 20 Videos
Showing Women with Large Chests
and Tight Asses with George
Michael Thrown in for Good
Measure. They played the Divinyls
too. That was cool. And ZZ Top's
"Legs." That was not cool.
Anyway, this expert panel (my
roommates Trinna and Yvette, of
course) decided that what might be
sexy to a 14-year-old boy who has
wet dreams about Heather Locklear
every night isn't necessarily sexy to
us, so we made a real list of 20 sexy
videos. Of course, we'd like to share
it with you. So without further
ado...
-"China Girl" -David Bowie
Trinna thought of this, but the

entire room (we even included a
male expert on this one) agreed that
this is one steamy vid. Ooh, baby,
just you shut your mouth.
" "Every Little Thing She Does is
Magic" - The Police
Was there any doubt that I
would choose a video in which
Stewart Copeland was prominently
featured? The tropical setting helps,
too.
- "With or Without You" - U2
Yvette's personal favorite. I,
too, will take Bono being sultry
over women in fishnet and little
else.
- "The One Thing" -INXS
Another of Trinna's top-ranking
vids. She says it's the food. Michael
Hutchence does have a way with
mangos.
* "Just Like Heaven" - Dinosaur
jr.
Call me twisted, but there's
something about dancing Muppets
that gets me every time. Maybe it's
the change that comes over Oscar
when he comes out of the can and
puts on that Deep Wound t-shirt.
* "Justify My Love" - Madonna
MTV won't play it 'cause it

would take time away from
Warrant's Cherry Pie (another top-
20 finalist) so I'm going on second-
hand knowledge, but I heard that
when you view the vid there better
not be a man within a one-mile ra-
dius, or at least it better be a man
you want. That's good enough for
me.
" "Billie Jean" - Michael Jackson
Trinna's got a thing for Michael.
- "Here Comes the Rain Again"
- The Eurythmics
- "On the Metro" - Berlin
-""I'm on Fire"- Bruce Springsteen
" "Sweet Child o' Mine" - Guns N'
Roses
- "Like a Prayer" - Madonna
- "Don't Stand so Close to Me"
The Police
" "Kool Thing" - Sonic Youth
" "Love Will Never Do Without
You" --Janet Jackson
* "1 Drove All Night" - Cyndi
Lauper
- "The Power and the Passion"
Midnight Oil
"'Let's Dance" - David Bowie
- "Freedom" - George Michael
- "I Want Your Sex" - George
Michael

U -

University professor ana antnropologist Mischa Titiev, picturea nere on
the right, allowed the University Exhibit Museum to use much of his
collection of Hopi art made by artists like the Hopi Indian at left.
Rattle and drum: a

*bit*of the"
by Diane Frieden
Unlike most collections, The Hopi
Collection of Misha Titiev is a
hodgepodge of souvenirs acquired by
University professor and anthro-
pologist Misha Titiev and his wife,
Estelle. The Hopi people, with
whom they stayed in northern
Arizona, gave the Titiev's house-
hold presents in the form of ceramic
pots and woven baskets, as well as
ritual objects such as eremonial
Kachina dolls. The exhibit displays
these gifts, identifying which were
designed with the white man
"tourist" in mind and which were
created for actual use.
Dr. Richard Ford's anthropology
class originally conceived the idea
to hold the exhibition, and his stu-
dents wrote most of the text mate-
rial. Terry Tompkins is a graduate
student Research Assistant closely
associated with the project. "The
major reason for this going up was
that most of the materials were re-
cently donated to the exhibit mu-
seum by Mrs. Titiev, and she didn't
want them to go into a shelf for just
Anthro grad students," he says,
laughing
Hopi ceramics and baskets are
produced mostly by the women in
the community. The men are in

HOPi1life-
charge of hunting and farming, and
also do some of the weaving. The
bowls on display are either deco-
rated trade ware for outsiders, such
as the whimsical pieces cast in ani-
mal shapes, or plain utilitarian
ware. A good example of the revival
style, dating to prehistoric and pre-
metal bowls, can be seen in the old
utilitarian pot by Fanny Nampeyo,
which is one of Tompkins' favorite
pieces. "It's more representative of
the older type of Hopi work," he
explains. "A lot of our Hopi pieces
are in this century, and are not from
the traditional point of view, but
are for sale to museums - this
takes the uniqueness away."
Colorful baskets were Hopi ves-
sels for preparing and serving food.
The color came either from natural
or chemical dyes, and a pattern was
often woven into the fibrous plate
or basket. The craftsmanship of a de-
tailed 1940s sifting basket is out-
standing, with its angular woven
reeds. Color also plays a part in the
Kachina dolls, representative of
called-upon spirits in the ceremo-
nial rites.
While the collection is scaled to
fit all ages, the text material is
fairly simplistic (think of the yel-
low school buses in front of the
See HOPI, Page 10

Robot Carnival's nine shorts
show the single greatest difference
between animation in America and
animation in Japan. The Japanese
have brought animation to adult-
hood by creating works for adults.
The tales are all wildly different in
style and content, yet uniform in
their portrayal of cybernetics in
turmoil.
Six of the shorts have no dia-
logue and rely on the visual momen-
tum of the action to tell the story.
The first one, Franken's Gears by
Kouji Morimoto, serves as an an-
nouncement for the focus and con-
tent of the films' themes. A quick
remake of Frankenstein, the action
occurs in the archetypical Franken-
stein lab, with great bolts of blue
energy flying hither and thither and
alighting on the monster on the
slab. The monster awakes and the
inevitable happens.
One of the strongest themes in
the films is the humanity of robots
and vice versa. In Starlight Angel and
Deprive, the hero metamorphasizes
between human and robot. The first,
by Hiroyuki Kitazume, is a parody
of the standard Disney movie re-
duced to about 10 minutes, with the
Write for summer arts
If you have some back-
ground or Interest In a
form of self-expression
related to the arts, call
763-0379 fid out how you
too can express yourself.

boy going through a rite of initia-
tion replaced by a robot that does
the same and becomes human. The
short even ends with a carnival that
looks very much like the Disney's
castle from the Wonderful World
of Disney.
The animation itself is of the
highest quality and differs greatly
from skit to skit. Nightmare by
Takashi Nakamura portrays a mech-
anized, boschian future, and every
frame is filled with roiling chaos,
while Cloud by Mao Lumbo shows
a character struggling against an
ever-present wind and opens and
closes with a small square portrait
framed in black. The film occasion-
ally drags its feet, but more often
than not the action rips along and
takes advantage of its medium to
show the impossible occurring with
ease.
Robot Carnival is being shown at
the Michigan Theater through
Friday. -Jon Rosenthal

We set the standard in recycling:
k inko'si
Recycles
Uses Recycled Materials

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