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April 23, 1991 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-23

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 23, 1991 - Page 5

Dems.
fight to
levive
rWASHINGTON (AP) -
Democratic congressional leaders,
hoping to revive efforts toward a
consensus civil rights bill, want to
Seet with corporate executives who
called off negotiations after pres-
sure from the Bush administration.
AT&T chief Robert Allen, who
halted big business' talks Friday,
was said by a spokesperson to have
halted talks just as it appeared they
were nearing agreement with civil
rights groups.
"What they did was reprehensi-
e," Ralph Neas, executive director
Cf the Leadership Conference on
Civil Rights, said of White House
officials. "They pulled out all the
stops in an effort to scuttle the
good faith negotiations."
Democrats and civil rights lead-
ers accused President Bush of trying
to sabotage efforts to reach agree-
ment out of a desire to keep the issue
of racial quotas alive as a political
Ssue for Republican candidates in
992. Bush contends the Democratic
bill would lead employers to use
racial quotas for hiring.
"There's no question, especially
in light of recent events, that the
White House does not want a strong
civil rights bill enacted into law.
What the White House wants is a
political issue around which to
demagogue," Neas said.
0 Presidential spokesperson
Marlin Fitzwater reiterated the
administration support for its own
bill and labeled the Democratic ver-
sion a "quota bill." Asked if he
were glad the corporate executives
had pulled out of the talks,
Fitzwater said, "Anyone is -free to
talk with anyone."
The Democratic sponsored bill is
ntended to reverse a series of
upreme Court decisions that made
it more difficult for minorities to
sue employers for job discrimina-
tion.

Eigth-graders are
subjects of 'U'
study on fitness

BRIAN CANTONI/Daily
Winners
Saturn Corporation awarded members of Students Honoring Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching (SHOUT)
$1,000 for their work in recognizing superior professors.
Baker meets with Kuwaiti rulers
as human rights abuses continue

by Garrick Wang
Daily Staff Reporter
Twelve hundred Michigan
eighth-grade students have received
reports from the University's
Fitness Research Center outlining
positive ways to eliminate the
health risks in their lives
The Center helped the state
schools appraise health knowledge,
behavior, stress levels, and attitudes
of their eighth-grade students
through a computerized "wellness"
survey.
"We helped develop and imple-
ment the survey because the state
wanted to increase individual
awareness and self-responsibility
for good health," said Marilyn
Edington, project director for the
survey.
The health survey is a new part
of the Michigan Model for
Comprehensive Health Education
and was developed in 1988 with the
Michigan Department of Public
Health.
Various versions of the health
surveytare administered in-class to
students from kindergarten to
* eighth-grade.
The Center introduced a comput-
erized version of the "wellness"
survey to eighth-graders three years
ago.
"We developed the computer-
ized version because we didn't want
to make (the eighth-graders) feel
r uncomfortable about taking the

survey," Edington said.
She added that 1,200 eighth-
graders who attended 20 randomly
selected schools throughout the
state participated in the first com-
puterized survey.
Eighth-graders answered ques-
tions via computer which covered
topics concerning personal care,
health history, health habits, stresst
ful situations, and knowledge iir
health related issues.
The responses were then sent
electronically to the Center fi,
analysis.
Each respondent received a confi-
dential, individualized report sum-,
marizing the risk factor in his or her
lifestyle and recommending posy
tive change. The Center used lane
guage compatible to the respon.
dents' vocabulary to write the con-'
fidential reports.
The state is currently using the
survey to establish a database whicW
compares the responses collected,
for the past two years. "
Edington said approximately 25,
percent of the respondents were ing
crash dieting or other risky behav-
iors which could harm their current
and future health.
She added that 40 percent of the,
students reported they experienced
at least one stressful life event such
as the death of a parent, serious accil.
dent, and the break-up with a
boyfriend or girlfriend.

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) -
The rulers of Kuwait told Secretary
of State James Baker yesterday that
they were working on governmental
reforms that he said could mark "a
radical transforming" of the
emirate.
The Kuwaiti government has
been accused of serious human rights
abuses following its return to
power.
Kuwait is under martial law and
its parliament was dissolved in
1986. A few hours before Baker
flew there from Saudi Arabia, op-
ponents of the ruling Sabah family
were barred from holding a protest
meeting, and last week Amnesty
International said human rights
abuses, including torture and execu-
tions, had swept Kuwait since it was
liberated.
But Baker got an entirely differ-
ent account on the situation in the
country, one of the richest in the
world, from the emir, Jabir al-
Ahmed Sabah, and the crown prince,
Saad Abdullah al-Sabah.
Asked if he had taken up with
Kuwait's rulers their boycott of

firms that do business with Israel,
Baker ended the airborne news con-
ference.
"I'm not going to comment on
that," he said.
In Kuwait, Baker got a close look
at a legacy of the Gulf War - more
than 500 burning oil wells that are
being subdued at a rate of about 20 a
week.
Visiting near dusk, as the flames
reached for the skies, Baker stopped
at the Ahmadi field's well No. 57,
which a "Red" Adair firefighting
crew from Texas expects to have
under control in a day or two.
Baker's scheduled Syria's partic-
ipation in a Mideast peace confer-
ence. Earlier, he bid for Soviet
cosponsorship of the initiative and
gained the sideline endorsement of
Saudi Arabia.
Baker's scheduled sessions with
President Hafez Assad and Foreign
Minister Farouk Sharaa loomed as
his most difficult challenge on the
Arab side, as he attempts to fashion
a format and agenda for the prospec-
tive peace talks. He was expected to
return to Israel today in hopes of re-

solving its concerns about the scope
of the proposal.
On the way from Jiddah, Saudi
Arabia, to Damascus, the secretary
of state took a brief detour to
Kuwait to reaffirm U.S. support of
the emirate.
Before leaving Jiddah, Baker had
a 35-minute telephone conversation
with Soviet Foreign Minister
Alexander Bessmertnykh. Baker
wants Moscow to cosponsor the
peace talks, provided the Soviets re-
sume full diplomatic relations with
Israel after a 24-year lapse.
Baker's detailed briefing of the
Soviet official raised a possibility
that Baker might fly to Moscow to
firm up a jointly sponsored con-
ference, provided he can resolve the
Arab-Israeli differences over the
agenda and the extent of third-party
participation.
Prince Saud, seeing Baker off to
Kuwait, said "It was conveyed to
the secretary that Saudi Arabia be-
lieves it is time to put an end to the
Arab-Israeli conflict and to achieve
a comprehensive and just solution to
the Palestinian question."

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