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April 22, 1991 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-22

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Page 6- The Michigan Daily-Sports Monday-April 22,1991

SOFTBALL
Continued from page 1
Tholl led off the inning with a
walk, stole second base, and scored
on an error by Petersen at second
base. Stacey Heams walked, stole
second and third, and scored on a
Benedict single to seal the 3-1
Wolverine victory.
In the opening game of the week-
end on Friday, Nelson pitched a
three-hit shutout antd struck out
eight Wildcats to pace Michigan to
a 5-0 victory.
In a makeup doubleheader Sun-
day, the Wolverines swept Western
Michigan in non-conference action.
In the first game, Kelly Forbis
(8-5) had a strong outing in the 4-1
victory. The Wolverines scored

twice in the first inning to take the
early lead.
In the fifth, Sieler continued her
torrid weekend of hitting with an
RBI single up the middle to score
Karla Kunnen. Sieler was replaced
on the base paths by pinch runner
Mary Campana, who scored on a
Tholl single to ice the Wolverine
victory.
In the nightcap, Michigan again
jumped out to the early lead with
three runs in the first inning. But
Western Michigan tied the game in
the bottom of the inning.
With the game knotted, 4-4, in
the top of the sixth, Michigan's
Shelley Bawol's sacrifice grounder
scored Kunnen to give Michigan the
lead. Clarkson (8-6) shut down the
Broncos in the rest of the game to
earn the complete game victory.

GILL
Continued from page 3
scribbles of four years of schooling,
and applying them in the work
place.
And it means packing up, saying
goodbye to the friends made in the
previous four years, and for some,
just hoping you receive a card at
Christmas time from them. Time to
change. Time to move on.
Yet, you can bet, in the next
week or two, there'll be a lot of
looking back.
Looking back to that first fall
Saturday when you were a student,
and learning what a football day in
Ann Arbor was all about. Kielbasa
and hotdogs, Bob Ufer playing out
of some fraternity house where you
heard there might be a big party
later that night.
"Wow," you said. "So this is
college. No wonder my parents
never wanted me to leave. I might
like this."
And there you were, in awe of
your surroundings. Learning that on
this day, you helped comprise the
largest crowd to watch a football
game anywhere in the nation.
Then you learned it happened
every weekend you came to the
stadium.

You remember your first trip to
Crisler Arena. You'd see these guys
like Gary Grant and Glen Rice play
right in front of your own eyes. Yet,
the place was so quiet, and so dark.
It just wasn't as much fun as you
thought.
There was the last game at
Crisler Arena your first year here,
winter of 1988. Steve Stoyko, the
Mark Koenig of yesteryear, made a
basket near the close of the game. He
couldn't help but rejoice. The crowd
went nuts. Then afterwards, Grant
told the crowd, "If I had to do it all
again, I'd have gone to UCLA."
Kidding? Who knows?
And then we come to women's
basketball. Most never made it
down to Crisler for all those games.
But all of a sudden, they turned into
a good team - winning in their
first NCAA tournament game ever.
Sure, there were downsides.
When recalling your college days,
the only thing you might remember
about the baseball team was that
they became the first Michigan team
ever to be sanctioned by the NCAA.
A tainted program, they were - yet
now filled with quality people at-
tempting to erase their black eye.
You might just remember the
hockey team for a few off-ice antics
that created a bad image for the en-

tire team.
You might remember singing the
old "Hey, Hey, Goodbye" song to
the Miami football team your
sophomore year - only to see an in-
credible comeback that left the
Hurricanes singing "The Victors,"
31-30.
And you might remember the
disappointment the basketball team
gave us the year after its national
championship.
Then there was the day that each
one of us cried a little bit, when Bo
Schembechler told us during a press
conference carried live by all three
Detroit TV stations that, "The
toughest thing I ever had to do is
give up my football team. ... (takes
a deep breath) ... But I'm doing it."
There were disappointments. We
won't even mention the Michigan
State football game this year, the
hockey team's snub by the NCAA
tournament selection last year, or
its chilling 3-2 triple overtime loss
to Bowling Green two years ago in
the CCHA playoffs, which left Red
Berenson saying, "It felt like your
house just burned down."
But there were those shining
moments. Moments that will erase
away the negatives as the years keep
coming, and the mind grows more
nostalgic and a little more nimble.

The party on South University the
night Michigan won the national-..
championship will, in a few years,
be said to have lasted a week.
They'll say that classes were can-
celled, and that teachers gave out au-
tomatic A's for anyone who could
name all five starters on the team.
That's a memory. It will grow.
And for many people, the last
great moment they witnessed at a
Michigan sporting event happened a'
few weeks ago, when the hockey
team defeated Cornell in the decid-
ing third game of the first round of
the NCAA playoffs. Yost Ice Are-
na became bedlam as the final sec-
onds ticked off the clock.
And no one wanted to stop cheer-
ing. As quiet as the arena had been a
few years ago, it now rocked.
The players skated around the
rink saluting the fans. Finally, only
three seniors remained on the ice.
They hugged their coach. And then
they disappeared, too.
If there's a moment to freeze
frame a final sports memory of your
Michigan days, that's the picture.
And then, life goes on.

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