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April 22, 1991 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-22

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Monday, April 22,1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson FORUM

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Continued from page 1
are others who say we're still in a
deficit situation and there may-still
be more cuts this year."
The budget process has been kind
to education so far. Last December,
higher education only received a 1
percent cut, in contrast to the 9.2
percent cuts other programs re-
ceived. In his 1991-92 budget pro-
posal, Engler recommended a 4 per-
cent increase in education appropria-

tions, while many other programs
face further reductions.
Sorenson argued that this plan
really works against some school
children.
"The same kids that go to school
are receiving Aid to Dependent
Children and Mental Health fund-
ing," Sorenson said. "That's the
problem - not that we don't sup-
port education."
Although the state says it is
only making 9.2 percent cuts in ser-
vices, since the cuts come in the

middle of the year, some programs
are facing 17 to 20 percent cuts.
Honest Candy, a counselor from
the Domestic Violence Project de-
scribed one woman's response when
she found out that her welfare check
would be reduced by 17 percent as
"laughter."
"It was so ridiculously impossi-
ble before, now it's 17 percent more
ridiculously impossible," the
woman told Candy.

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ELDERLY
Continued from page 1
an attempt to provide different
kinds of programs in nursing homes
that haven't traditionally been
there."
LSA sophomore Juanita
Velasquez, a project volunteer, said
the program had given both her and
the nursing home residents a pos-
itive experience.
"You're bringing them back to
life. You're offering them vitality.
If they cut it down, these people are
going to be left at the nursing
homes to whither away," she said.
"They've gone through so much al-
ready, they don't deserve to be left
m

in the home and be forgotten
about."
Velasquez added she would con-
tinue to volunteer next year.
LSA senior Rachel Oleniczak, an-
other volunteer, said she believes
the elderly will be hurt by the loss
of the program.
"I'm worried the quality of life
will change for the residents. These
are things that can't be continued by
the nursing home staff."
Oleniczak said she is attempting
to get money from the Trained
Volunteer Corps to train new vol-
unteers.
Lapidos said volunteers could be
of great help in maintaining the pro-
ject, but cautioned, "That's just

what the governor wants."
She said Engler wants volunteers
to take on these programs, saving
money for the state. "They can't be
run on a volunteer basis to the ex-
tent that a professional organiza-
tion can. It takes professional de-
grees."
Lapidos, who has a masters'
degree in social work from the
University, spoke of a 100-year-old
woman who was upset by the cut.
"She talked about what a loss this
will be because so many of the
programs had brought back to life
skills they had thought were dor-
mant."

RALLY
Continued from page 1
symbol, it's action."
"It's also scary how many men
have opposed this march as we
walked by. It's sad how many
women have passed by and haven't
joined," RC senior Kirsten Mowrey
said.
Mowrey said some fraternity
members had shouted as the
marchers walked by the house,
"You're going to get what you're
asking for," to the marchers.
Mowrey took this statement to sig-
nify women 'deserved' being raped.
"This whole thing is to oppose
that and here they are getting vio-
lent," Mowrey added.
During their rally, the men also
issued a list of demands, including
that men pledge to support victims
of male violence and re-evaluate
stereotypical male and female be-
haviors in order to achieve equality.
Stereotypes also harm men,
speakers said. "We have to refuse to
HAC
Continued from page 1
Councilmember Kurt Zimmer
(D-Fourth Ward), who signed the
petition, said he will vote for the
structure if it goes to ballot.
Although Zimmer believes the city
is too far into the building process,
he said the citizens should have the
opportunity to determine whether
or not they want it.
"At three and a half years and
$1.25 million into the process, I'd

be male in the way males have been
defined. (The answer) is to stop be-
ing a way in which we are not, but
have been fabricated," said
Sociology professor Luis Sfeir-
Younis. "We may be victimized as
much as women, but we are victim-
ized in a golden cage."
"Men have to stop raping. It's
just as simple as that. Men have to
change their senses of themselves so
that kind of violence is not needed
to express ourselves," said Jeff
Palter.
Additionally, United Health
Spas and Kikit were declared the
winners (losers) of the sexism in
advertising contest.
The Take Back the Night theme
from a Federbush song was to "Take
Back the Night/ The streets were
made for walking/ Why must we
live in fear?/ There's someone stalk-
ing/ Hold up your head/ And breathe
the midnight air/ We will be safe/
Whatever we're wearing ... Til men
respect/ Their sister as their
brother/ We will be safe/
Supporting one another."
hate to see the whole plan col-
lapse," he said.
If the citizens of Ann Arbor
vote down construction of the
structure in a referendum, there is
still the issue of what the
Downtown Development
Authority would fund instead.
"It isn't like the money is there
and it can't be diverted to something
else. If we don't approve the bonds
for the structure, we don't approve
the bonds for the structure. It
doesn't mean ... we have $8 million
for something else," Eckstein said.

SHOOTING
Continued from page 1
Friday morning.
Assistant County Prosecutor
Robert Cooper, however, said
Guiles should have known that the
building would not be completely
unoccupied even at 2:30 a.m.
Detective Tanner added that one of
the bullets almost hit the security
guard.
Tanner also testified in the ar-
raignment that Guiles told police he
has been suffering from chronic fa-
tigue for more than five years.

Three years ago, Guiles, who had
written for the University Institute
of Science and Technology since
1979, brought civil charges against
the University's Board of Regents
claiming he had been wrongfully
denied paid medical leave after being
diagnosed as having Epstein-Barr
Syndrome.
A spokesperson at Ask-a-Nurse,
a health information and referral
phone service, said yesterday that
Epstein-Barr syndrome is diagnosed
in part by the onset of persistent and
easy fatigueability that does not re-
solve with bedrest.

hie L b an BafiU
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