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April 12, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, April 12, 1991

:Calvin and Hobbes.

by Bill Watterson Saudis stop funding PLO as

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Baker continues Mideast tour

AWARDS
Continued from pag
Recognition Awards
certificates.
Ellis said the awa
to groups that tried ni
in service.
"A good example
ing something new
was Info Stops, a ne
help parents and ne
move-in week," he sai
LSA Sophomo
a Szerlag, who receive
being the editor of a
S-7
Eta Kappa Nu
created to brin
- ~who by their a
ability in their
colleges, and I
Engineering w
y ~character have <
ti We, the office
would like to a
completing the
Chris
Kok E
Todd]
w David
Paul E
Hsin
John
Charl
4-
4.
N p
9.
34
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e l
s, which were
rds were given
ew approaches
of a group do-
and different
-w program to
w students in
id.
re Heather
d an award for
new campus

magazine, the International Ob-
server, said she was pleased at being
recognized.
'It was great to see
groups recognized. So
many people tend not
to think about (com-
munity service)'
- Michael Ellis
SODC Intern
"But it would have been better if
the whole magazine had been recog-
nized, since it was a group effort,"
she added.

Szerlag believed Van Valey's
speech was not appropriate.
"I sympathize with her views,
and there were worthwhile groups
that weren't mentioned," she said,
"but her speech minimized what the
people sitting there had done, taking
away the moment for some people. I
know there was a lot of dismay
from the crowd."
Of the awards ceremony, Ellis
said he felt "it was great to see
groups recognized. So many people
tend not to think about (community
service) ... they get wrapped up in
grades and classes. But it's very
valuable."

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) -
Saudi Arabia's foreign minister
told Secretary of State James
Baker yesterday that his govern-
ment was cutting off financial
support to the Palestine Liberation
Organization, a U.S. official said.
Prince Saud also responded
positively to an Israeli proposal for
Mideast peace talks, the official
said as Baker flew to Damascus
for an appraisal of the plan from
Syrian President Hafez Assad.
Assessing his efforts so far,
Baker said, "We've made some
progress but there's still a lot that
has to be done."
Speaking to reporters before he
saw Assad, Baker said there was
potential for a breakthrough. And
yet, he said, "We're hoping people
wouldn't rush to judgment. It isn't
black and white."
Syrian government radio, which
usually reflects Assad's views,

stressed that Israel must adhere to
U.N. resolutions calling for with-
drawal from lands that had been
held by the Arabs until the 1967
Mideast war.
Otherwise, the radio said, "an
effort to find peace in the Middle
East is stillborn."
Baker, too, is insisting that any
negotiation be held on the basis of
the resolutions, which were ap-
proved by the Security Council in
1967 and 1973. President Bush
calls the U.S. policy a "territory for
peace" formula.
There was no immediate word
on what Assad told Baker. The
Syrian's views could be critical for
the outcome of the peace mission.
Assad wants to recover the
Golan Heights from Israel. Until
Syria's defeat in the 1967 war, vil-
lages in northern Israel were under
periodic Syrian attack from the
Golan Heights.

BUSH

ETA KAPPA NU ASSOCIATION

Continued from page 1
Speculation exists that Bush
chose to speak at commencement to
launch an initiative similar to the
"Great Society" former President
Lyndon Johnson kicked off at the
University's 1965 commencement.
"One can anticipate a significant
address because the President picks
his occasions carefully," D'Arms
said. "He will want to address im-
portant domestic or foreign issues
- perhaps education."
The University faced an obstacle
Wednesday when White House offi-
cials visited the stadium and found
the platform being constructed to
be inadequate due to its location.
The platform - originally in an
end zone - will be moved in front
of the tunnel. The White House rep-
resentatives were concerned with
Bush walking from the tunnel to a
podium in the end zone.

FUNDS
Continued from page 1
Vice President and Chief
Financial Officer Farris Womack
said the University was one of many
institutions being surveyed by HSS
in response to a General Accounting
Office (GAO) request. GAO wanted
to have a sample of universities
from different regions.
Womack said the difference be-
tween an audit and a survey lies in
the extent of the investigation. An
audit takes comprehensive samples
of various areas of research the
University conducts and examines
the use of the indirect cost recover-
ies. A survey chooses several topics
such as the procedures in which a de-
partment and administration use
equipment.
However, Womack did not know
how extensive the survey would be.
University officers are not wor-
ried about the potential findings of
the HHS audit. "HHS has been
through our books very recently; we
aren't expecting any surprises,"
ROCK

Association, the National Electrical and Computer Engineering honor society, was
g into closer union those in the profession of Electrical or Computer Engineering
ttainments in college or in practice have manifested a deep interest and marked
chosen life work, so as to foster a spirit of liberal culture in the Engineering
to mark in an outstanding manner those students in Electrical or Computer
,ho through distinguished scholarship, activities, leadership and exemplary
conferred honor on their Alma Mater.
rs of the Beta Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu at the University of Michigan,
ongratulate the following students for meeting the membership requirements and
initation process, thus becoming active members of Eta Kappa Nu:'

Whatever the Saudis' motiv-
tion, a suspension of financial sup
port to the PLO could build confi-
dence in Israel that Arab attitudes
are changing.
Baker has been trying to sell
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on
that idea in order to encourage him
to risk giving up territory to the
Arabs in a peace settlement.
Baker met with Saud in Cairo
and then flew here to see Assa
He also met with Tunisian Foreign
Minister Al-Habib ben Yahia. The
PLO's headquarters are in Tunis.
"We were pretty pleased with
the character and content of the
meeting," the senior U.S. official
said of the hour-long session with
Saud in Cairo.
"He had a lot of questions,"
said the official, who briefed re-
porters aboard Baker's plane o*
condition he not be named. "We
look at that as a sign of interest."
Harrison said.
GAO is surveying a total of four
universities around the country:
Harvard Medical School, Stanford,
MIT, and Berkeley; HHS is survey-
ing nine universities, including the
University.
John Ols, the GAO director in
charge of the indirect cost investiga-
tion, said findings of corruption at
Stanford was a major reason for the
increase in investigations of major
universities.
"We extended the investigation
to find out if the system has prob-
lems or if Stanford was an isolated
case," Ols said.. 0
Stanford University administra-
tors were charged with using the
indirect cost recovery funds for per-
sonal items.
GAO hopes these investigations
will be useful to make policy rec-
ommendations to Congress regard-
ing federal government grants. "We
will recommend to Congress to
change things to administer or leg
islate that proper costs are paid bp
the government," Ols said.
Hyland cited an event from the
Gulf War as an example of how
changes in Europe are already affect-
ing American policies. When troops
were needed for the last ground
campaign of the war, reinforcements
were brought in from Germany,
Hyland said.
"We could not have taken those
troops out of Western Europe 10
years ago," Hyland said.
Ford Library Director Frank
Mackaman said he was pleased with
the event. "We raised questions that
will frame the debate for the next
few years," Mackaman said.
LSA senior Brian Portnoy also
said he was impressed by the collo-
quium. 0
"There were some good prescrip-
tions for an era that is going to be
more confusing than people think,"
Portnoy said.
In addition to his comments on
the forum, Ford said he was happy
to be back at his alma mater.
"I have nothing but great loyal-
ties and great gratitude to the
University," Ford said. "I came here
at a time of economic difficulty, but*
I survived and got a great education
and have always been thankful for
it."

topher N. Abellera
Eng Ang
Basso
[Boettger
Branoff
Chiang
Cottingham
A. Ericson
Gaith
le Green

Alan M. Hoffman
Debbie Hsu
James Johnson
Dave Keyser
C. David Kibler
Paul Koivula
Anton Lee
Ian Yen-Yin Lee
Christopher J. Peltz
Ranna H. Prajapati

Carlos V. Rozas
Brock R. Rycenga
Nicholas G. Samra
Aneil C. Shah
Dermress Elise Stockman
Bradd W. Szonye
Kevin Urban
Richard J. Viau
David A. White

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Continued from page 1
In a question and answer session
after the speakers, Ford said he
agreed "110 percent" with Hy-
land's analysis, except for the
terminology "selective disengage-
ment."
"I never like to defend some-
thing that shows you're weaken-
ing," Ford said. Instead, he sug-
gested the term "selective partici-
pation."
In keeping with the theme of
German reunification, a graffiti-
covered piece of the Berlin wall was
presented to Ford and the library.
"President Ford contributed to
the momentum of the events hap-
pening in Europe today," said
Martin Allen, chair of the Ford
Foundation. "We felt that the most
symbolic gift we could give was a
large piece of the Berlin wall."
But Ford attributed the success
of recent foreign policy to the sup-
port of the American people.
"When the chips are down, the rea-
son our policies have been successful
for 40 years is because the American
people support them," he said.

' "' +

Have you tried
O'Sullivan's
Sunday Brunch?

Religious
Services
AVAIVAVWAVA
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church at U-M)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m. at St. Andrew's
Supper-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
The Rev. Virginia Peacock, Ph.D., Chaplain
Cal 665-0606
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron
SUN.: Worship-9:55 a.m.
WED.: Supper & Fellowship-5:30 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hill & South University)
SUNDAYS
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Group-9:30
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10 a.ni.
WEDNESDAY: Worship-7:30 p.m.
Campus Pastor: John Rollefson
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
SAT.: Weekend Liturgies-5 p.m., and
SUN.:-8:30 a.m.,10 a.m, 12 noon, and 5 p.m.
FRI.: Confessions-4-5 p.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Worship-9 p.m.
Pastor, Ed Krauss-663-5560

I

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1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
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It's a great bargain at 'S
(and it's all you can eat!)

bar b

Two egg dishes,

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0

baconsaus age,gravy,bagels,
danishcinamon rolls,
mixed fruit and waffles
t7'nllivan's Fnterv & nh

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