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April 04, 1991 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-04

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ARTS

Thursday, April 4, 1991

Page 5

Stop your crying

- Mould returns

by Annette Petruso and
Kristin Palm
C hrist rose way before Easter, in
New York City, alone, with an
acoustic guitar in hand and a lot on
his mind. He appears at the Blind
Pig, of all places, tonight. Yup, Bob
Mould has extended his tour to in-
clude solo acoustic dates, and he's
blessing us again with his spiritual
presence.
Why such strong religious im-
agery, you might wonder, for a mere
rock musician? Mould's ability to
convey his emotional states, ex-
pressed so eloquently in his two
solo albums, Workbook and Black
Sheets of Rain, seem to heal him and
listeners, because they can find wis-
dom, too, if they choose to. Or they
can just find some damn good tunes.
Not to mention Mould's devastat-
ing guitar talents, which comple-
ment, if not overwhelm, his pensive
lyrics.
Speaking of guitars, what will
happen to the standard harsh guitar
of Mould's live shows when he
switches from electric to acoustic?
Since Mould is being elusive this

leg of the tour and would not give
interviews, we wonder. Will it re-
ally be Unplugged at the Pig? A one-
man jam playing different versions
of his songs (maybe even HUsker
stuff for the older folks, hint, hint)
and neato covers? Self-indulgent so-
los and obscure ramblings? What-
ever he decides to play, intrigue
should ensue.
We also wonder if Mould is
lonely playing all these dates or if
having all the attention focused on
him is unnerving. Well, he did write
Workbook alone in a Minnesota
farm house, and look how good that
turned out. And people have been
the real McCoy..
couldn't even play
'Stairway to Heaven,'
as far as we know
paying homage to him for what
seems like ages. We also wonder
about the origins of his last name,
the British spelling of mold. Like
the stuff that grows on leftovers in
the frig after a month.

Early word from someone who
caught his show in Jersey said the
standard, "That was the best show I.
ever saw." Why believe her? With .
Mould, you know it's true.
But what about the thrash/bash
factor? Mould's previous Ann
Arbor appearances have basically
been drunken slamfests with a
soundtrack eminently superior to
what is generally found in these
parts. Can he keep up the energy and
keep us transfixed with a fine-tuned.-
acoustic axe? We don't see why not.
After all, the real McCoy still has
people celebrating him once every
week, and on special holidays, too.
And he couldn't even play
"Stairway to Heaven," as far as we
know. One epiphanic Thursday night
with Mould doesn't seem out of the
question.
BOB MOULD consecrates the
Blind Pig tonight with VIC CHEST-
NUTT opening. Doors open at 9:30
p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance,
available at TicketMaster
(p.e.s.c.) Believe us, it will be
worth every cent.

Sonja (Lena Stolze) and her future husband, Martin (Robert Giggenbach), make out beneath a symbolic tree
shrine (which, we are told, was formerly a gallows) in Michael Verhoeven's The Nasty Girl.
It's Herr Eichmann if

ISAC

University
Students
Against Cance
PRESENTS

O SO
or 'j
r .

you're nasty

The Nasty Girl
dir. Michael Verhoeven

J1

by Mark Binelli
here were you from '39 to
'45? Where are you now?" reads the
graffiti being wiped from a German
#all during the opening credits of
'he Nasty Girl, Michael
Verhoeven's Brechtian black com-
edy about post-World War II guilt
set in the fictional Bavarian
Everytown of Pfilzing. Loosely
based on the experiences of historian
Anja Elisabeth Rosmus, the film
follows Sonja (Lena Stolze), a
German girl innocently researching
an essay topic, "My Hometown
wring the Third Reich."
She meets with strong resistance
from the locals she questions, even-
tually discovering that the white-
washed town history she has been
taught, with tales, of a great resis-
tance movement and few actual
Nazis, is a cover-up. As she grows
older, Sonja continues to dig, find-
ing out more facts that she
shouldn't be finding out and eventu-
*lly becoming highly resented by
most members of the community.
She finds comfort in her delight-
fully supportive, woad-chopping
grandmother (Elisabeth Bertram),
kbut ends up being stonewalled by
city officials and physically threat-
ened by masked neo-Nazi thugs.
If this lone-woman-versus-The-

Establishment plot sounds suspi-
ciously like a Meryl Streep film,
well, it easily could have been, if
Verhoeven hadn't transcended the
basic story with some fantastic sto-
rytelling, coming up with an uncon-
ventional, at times surreal, final
product. When Sonja sues the city
for the right to access information,
for instance, we don't get a long,
drawn-out courtroom melodrama;
instead, we see a live woman dressed
up like the statue of Justice in the
back of the court, snoring loudly.
She wakes up, Sonja wins and the
next scene is of Sonja standing in the
street, inexplicably yodeling.
The entire movie is narrated by
Sonja, who isoften filmed staring
directly at the camera and speaking
into a microphone; other characters
are also thrust through the fourth
wall with similar interview tech-
niques. The numerous flashbacks to
Sonja's youth, meanwhile, are
filmed in black and white, while
flashbacks within flashbacks are
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filmed in an over-exposed yellow
and the present day is shot in bright
commercial color.
The scenes themselves are short
and jumpy, with odd angles and
lenses used in numerous shots, and
certain scenes taking place in front
of backgrounds obviously projected
onto a screen. Other scenes feature
Sonja's family sitting and talking in
their living room, which has no
walls and floats through the streets
of Pfilzing as people stand and
stare. A disturbing fascist undercur-
rent is also set up, as relatively
straightforward narrative scenes are
interspersed with shorter, unrelated
scenes of Blond Boys in Beer Halls
and blackshirts practicing by the
river bank.
This unique style of filmmaking
makes The Nasty Girl worth seeing,
but it also, albeit intentionally, re-
sults in Brecht's Verfremdung-
saffekt, or alienation affect, a
deliberate distancing of the
See NASTY, Page 8

Morrissey
Kill Uncle
Sire/Reprise
You know, the problem with
solo Morrissey is not that his lyrics
are any less bitingly witty or that
his voice has become any less fragile,
but that there are no songs, save one
outstanding example, that have this
musical umph, a harsh quality, a
complex sound, a drive that makes
the tempo move you as much as the
words themselves.
From "William, It Was Really
Nothing" to "Bigmouth Strikes
Again" and "The Queen is Dead" to
"Stop Me If You Think You've
Heard This One Before," Morrissey,
obviously in conjunction with
guitar-meister Johnny Marr,
grabbed you delicately by the throat
and made you thrash your silly
unhappiness away.rThe only solo
song that came close, and, I would
submit, matched at least "Stop
Me," was the prime "November
Spawned a Monster." Perhaps it is
his weak choices of post-Marr
collaborators, but if the Bard of
Manchester can do it once, he
certainly can do it again.
Morrissey certainly tries. "Our

Frank," the first cut on his second
real solo album, Kill Uncle, vainly
attempts to not be a mire-stuck,
dreary, ballad-like lamentation. The
peppy beginning and uppity key-
board accents throughout the song
make it better than most songs on
the album, but it sounds like it
could be on a Lite-music for lite old
people radio station. "Sing Your
Life" and "Mute Witness" sound
like they could be also in heavy ro-
tation next to Anita Baker or
Barbara Streisand, or even worse, a
commercial for something yuppy.
"King Leer" is a Lite cha-cha for the
grandparents.
Even the songs that are slightly
See RECORDS, Page 8

M
Rubber
Duck
HOT TUB
"RAFFLE"
Ticket Sales will be held
in the Fishbowl now 'til
Friday, April 5, 1991
Portion of the proceeds to the
American Cancer Society
at

PELLEAS IAND LISANDE

r
r /
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An adaptation of Maeterlinck's
classic love tragedy
Trueblood Theatre
Apr. 4 - 6, 11 - 13 at 8 PM;
Apr.7,14 at2PM
Tickets: $9 general admission
Students $5 with ID at , "10(H
the League Ticket Office. fO13

ta

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The Nasty Girl

z'. .. p PG "-13
Cyrano De Bergerac
PRESENT THIS COUPON WITH
PURCHASED TICKET THRU
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Mass Meeting A-M April 7, 9-lOpm
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N-Z April 8, 8-9pm
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If conflict, attend the other meeting

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, ii

.. .

The University Activities Center Presents:

* f
U of M's Co-Ed A Cappella
Singing Ensemble's
Spring Concert
Featuring music including Doo-Wop, Jazz,
Classical Take-Offs, Current Hits and more.
Friday, April 5

v .CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE
CULTURAL KIND
A CONFERENCE ON CULTURE CONTACT
FRIDAY, APRIL 5: RAC[HAM ASSEMBLY HALL, 4TH FLOOR
I. THE POLITICS OF DESIRE 9:00-10:50
It. TRAVELLERS 11:00-12:30
III. COSMOLOGIES IN CONFLICT 1:30-3:15
IV. INVENTED AND BORROWED
TRADITIONS 3:30-5:00
KEYNOTE ADDRESS: THE POLITICS OF
CULTURE IN SOUTH AFRICA"
RACK[AM AMPHITHEATER
6:10
SATURDAY, APRIL 6: THE ALUMNI CENTER
. . CULTURAL IDENTITIES 9:00-10:30
LI _ II. EXILES AND ADOPTIONS 10:40-12:30

11

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