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April 04, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-04

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, April 4, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson

Toiletry collection benefits
homeless, student volunteers

WELL, IT'S THE 40, READ TE
END OF CM2IER WOVE BOO.,OKZ?
ONE .WE'LL
STOP 4E .
IRAQ
Continued from page 1
"I do not want to see us get
sucked into the internal struggle in
Iraq," Bush told reporters in
Florida, where he was vacationing.
Iraq yesterday announced the
capture of the northern city of
Suleimaniyah and a rebel spokesper-
son in Syria confirmed the city had
fallen.
International relief officials say

CAmk, TKEO's a N !
taus v MORE PAGS FR s' AT"
ARO Ut LATE. WMLL TOr\G TM!
TOMoRROi.
up to three million civilians have
fled their homes in northern Iraq,
and many fled to the rugged north-
ern mountains, where they face
hunger and exposure.
If Iraq rejects yesterday's reso-
lution, the U.N.-imposed trade em-
bargo would continue. The embargo
was ordered four days after Iraq
seized Kuwait Aug. 2.
The resolution demands the
U.N.-supervised destruction of
Iraq's chemical and biological

GEE , i MUSIAT I 4E TO WR\TE
REAWB I\KE A PAPER ON IT
TW\S. ToOoRRoW.
weapons, nuclear weapons-grade
materials and ballistic missiles
with a range of more than 90 miles.
That would leave Iraq unable to
fire missiles into Israel, as it did
during the war.
U.N. military observers would
be sent to patrol the Iraq-Kuwait
border, and Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cuellar would encourage
mediation between the two coun-
tries to demarcate their frontier.

by Bethany Robertson
Daily Staff Reporter

Students from six campus resi-
dence halls searched through their
medicine cabinets and top closet
shelves for toiletry items to donate
to a collection for the homeless last
night.
But the homeless people at the
Ann Arbor Shelter Association and
Prospect Place who will receive the
items won't be the only people to
benefit from the collection.
"I feel good," said LSA first-
year student Tricia Magante, who
participated in the collection. "I
rarely did anything like this be-
fore."
An estimated 80 to 100 students
went door to door collecting items
in residence halls and organized col-
lection sites in four others as a part
of Serve Week, a week designed to
focus campus attention on commu-
posal;
' pay for stewards - GEO
wants an additional pay increase for
stewards (representatives in de-
partments who promote GEO
events), while the University has
not responded;
summer health benefits -
GEO wants additional health bene-
fits in the summer, while the
University wants to maintain the
current policy of health care during
the school year;
. child care - GEO wants addi-
tional child care benefits, while the
University wants to maintain the
current child care benefits;
pay for TA training - GEO
wants pay for mandatory TA train-
ing, while the University has not re-
sponded.

nity service.
While hands-on activities like
last night's collection will assist
service organizations throughout
Ann Arbor, event organizers said
they also hope to offer participants
"a taste" of volunteer work.
"By giving people an opportu-
nity to participate in community
service, they realize what a differ-
ence they can make, not only in other
people's lives, but in their own,"
said Jared Genser, a first-year LSA
student and organizer of last night's
collection. "I've always felt it's
important to get people involved in
community service because it helps
them realize they can make a differ-
ence."
Many of the students collecting
items were participating in their
first service project at the
University.
"I wanted to get involved with
the homeless," said LSA first-year
student Jane Wheeler. "I figure this
is a good first step."

Items such as soap, shampoo and
toothbrushes can help people com-
ing off the streets feel human again,
Genser said.
"It's amazing how much a sim-
ple bar of soap can do for people's
self esteem," he said.
"When you're worried about
what you're going to eat, buying de-
odorant doesn't figure real high on
your list of priorities," said gradu-
ate student Wendy VanHousen, who
assisted in the collection.
Residents were generally recep-
tive to requests for spare toiletries.
"We had one guy who dumped
out all his shampoo and then went
to his closet and pulled out more,"
Genser said.
Some students were unable to
give, citing low supplies.
"I'm down on everything my-
self," one West Quad resident said.
But the majority of students do-
nated at least a bar of soap, if not
more, organizers said.

TEACH-IN
Continued from page 1
campus speaking to many TAs who
are planning to picket or stay
home," she said. "I think it is going
to be successful."
Rolls said most undergraduates
she has talked with support GEO.
"Most undergraduates seem to
be making an effort to become in-
formed. Once they discuss the fun-

damental issues they seem to be
supportive,"she said. "We are doing
this (striking) for the undergradu-
ates as well as for our own member-
ship."
Kock added that GEO has also
garnered sympathy from faculty
members and administrators.
"We've received a number of
supportive statements from them.
There have been more statements of
support than against," Kock said.

MEETING
Continued from page 1
third-person arbitration -
GEO wants to maintain the current
policy of going to an outside source
for TA grievances, while the
University wants to be the final au-
thority on all TA grievances;
salary increases - the current
economic proposal for GEO is a 9
percent salary increase over the next
two years and a cost-of-living-ad-
justment relative to the inflation
rate, while the University has pro-
posed a 4 percent increase in 1991-92
and a 4.5 percent increase in 1992-93;
class size limitations - GEO
wants a 25-student limit in discus-
sion sections, while the University
has not responded to GEO's pro-

Engineers find method
to break down PCBs

*AMERICA'S FIRST
ASIAN AMERICAN
GOVERNOR
*U OF M LAW SCHOOL
CLASS OF 1952
*MICHIGAN STATE
CLASS OF 1949
THE HONORABLE
GEORGE ARIYOSHI
GOVERNOR OF HAWAII, 1974-86
WILL SPEAK ON
ASIAN AMERICANS
AND
POLITICAL LEADERSHIP
FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1991
3:30 P M
250 HUTCHINS HALL
RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
SPONSORED BY:
,6IAN AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL
KING/CHAVEZ/PARKS PROGRAM
AMERICAN CULTURE PROGRAM
UNITED ASIAN AMERICAN ORGANIZATION

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by Gwen Shaffer
Daily Staff Reporter
A team of environmental engi-
neers from the University have dis-
covered a method for destroying
toxic PCBs in contaminated river
bed sediments. The process works by
combining the pollutant-eating
ability of two different types of
microbes.
The researchers have found that
PCB levels may be significantly re-
duced by first applying anaerobic
bacteria, whichlive in the absence of
oxygen, to the river sediment. These
are capable of degrading the lightly
chlorinated material. Next, aerobic
bacteria, which need oxygen to sur-
vive, attack the highly chlorinated
PCBs.
Civil and Environmental En-
gineering Prof. Timothy Vogel and
visiting assistant research scientist
Paul Anid were involved in testing
the method. They were not available
for comment.
The results are important be-
cause testing biological processes is
a fairly new area of research.
"Until a few years ago, PCBs
were thought to be non-biodegrad-
able," said Larry Nies, a graduate
student who tested the process on
contaminated sediments in the
Hudson River.
Although many of the toxicity
studies done on PCBs have been dis-
credited, the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency (EPA) still con-
siders them a human carcinogenic,
EPA specialist Scott Cooper said.
The biological degradation pro-

cess has several advantages over tra-
ditional methods.
"Depending on the material and
the concentration of PCBs, they are
disposed of through incineration or
landfilling," Cooper said.
"What they have done in the
past is to just move the PCBs," Nies
said. "This costs an awful lot and
doesn't solve the problem at all."
PCBs are found worldwide.
"Millions of tons of PCBs were@
produced from 1929 to 1977 for use
in things like transformers, hy-
draulic fluids, carbon paper, and pes-
ticides. PCBs were easy to produce,
cheap, and thought to be non-toxic,"
Nies said.
The researchers have not suc-
ceeded in completely degrading
PCBs from river sediment samples,
but have reduced concentrations
from 300 parts per million (ppm)
to approximately 50 ppm.
Researchers are seeking EPA ap-
proval to market their findings.
"The researchers have to show
that they are able to destroy signifi-
cant amounts of PCBs, then they can
apply for a commercial permit,"
Cooper said.
General Electric is providing a
large amount of funding for the re-
search project.
"GE is potentially responsible
for a number of PCB contaminated
sites," said Dan Abramowicz, man-
ager of the environmental technol-
ogy program at GE. "Although GE
didn't make PCBs, they were used in
many of our electrical appliances as
insulators."

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SACUA
Continued from page 1
ential existed within the relation-
ship."
Dawson said that while the
University clearly frowns on such
relationships, the right to privacy
included in the Constitution may
prevent an outright prohibition.
According to SACUA Research
Associate Teryl Schessler, the cur-
rent draft of the policy is still lack-

ing in several areas. W
For instance, Schessler said
SACUA would like to see provi-
sions in the policy which would ad-
dress the issue of how records will
be kept in order to protect the pri-
vacy of the victim or person being
complained against.
Additionally, SACUA would
like the next draft to include a pro-
vision which would allow for fac-
ulty representation on review
boards.

U~b 1J~tlo4an &UIQl'
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