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March 29, 1991 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-29

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Page 12-The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 29, 1991

Hockey Wildcats beat
Maine, advance to final

Men's

Associated Press
ST. PAUL, Minn. - Northern
Michigan took the scenic route to
its first NCAA hockey
championship game in 11 years.
Dallas Drake snapped a tie with
3:13 to play Thursday, lifting the
travel-weary Wildcats to a 5-3
semifinal victory over Maine and
extending their unbeaten streak to
25 games.
Northern (37-5-4), 23-0-2 since
last losing on Dec. 21, is the only
team from the West represented in
the final four. The Wildcats avenged
two regular-season losses to Maine
- one of only three teams to beat
them.
The Wildcats didn't arrive in St.
Paul until 8:15 p.m. Wednesday -
about 12 hours behind schedule -
because their flight was canceled
due to fog and they had to make a 7
1/2-hour bus ride from Marquette,
Mich.
"I really felt our guys were go-
ing to be tired in the first period be-
cause of our screwy trip," Northern
coach Rick Comley said. "I felt if
"we could keep it tight, we would
get better as the game went on.

That's what we've been doing all
year.
It was Maine that got tired at
the end, partly because of the Wild-
cats' relentless pressure and partly
because fourth-line center Dave La-
Couture broke his clavicle in the
first period.
"We had to do some double-
shifting and it was a case of some of
our players being tired," Maine
coach Shawn Walsh said. "When
you get tired you make mistakes. We
didn't counter as well as we wanted
to."
Northern had enough energy to
respond when it found itself in an
unusual position: tied late in the
game. The Wildcats are 32-0-2 when
leading after two periods but al-
lowed Jean-Yves Roy's power-play
goal with 9:21 remaining to make it
3-3.
With 3:40 left, a bid for a game-
winner by Northern's Ed Ward hit
the post. But 27 seconds later, Drake
set up his own winner by leading
Kevin Scott into Maine ice. Scott's
slap shot was stopped by goalie
Mike Dunham, but Drake was alone
for the rebound.

track

LSA STUDENTS
It has come to the attention of the LS&A Curriculum Committee that some
final exams have been re-scheduled in previous semesters at times other
than those posted in the Time Schedule.
The Curriculum Committee views this as a trend that may not be in your best
interests. Re-scheduling exams into earlier time periods may mean that
you will lose the final class period; it may mean that you are denied review
time in class; and it may rob you of study days. The committee wishes you
to know what the regulations are with regard to this practice and to know
your rights as students.
The Faculty Code says:
An instructor may not depart from the official schedule unless prior
approval of the Final Examination Committee is obtained.
o* All students are expected to take their final examinations at the time
fixed inthe official schedule of examinations. No single studentmay be
examined at a time earlier or later than the official time unless a
mutually agreeable time has been arranged in advance bythe student
and the instructor.
Whether used for lecture or review, the committee believes thatyou have
the right to have your final class periods and the complete assigned Study
Days-few as they are. If an instructor re-schedules an examination, you
have a right to take itat the scheduled time period.
If you experience any difficulty in this regard, please see
Assistant Dean Eugene Nissen (1402 Mason Hall; 764-7297) or
Mr. Alfred Stuart, University Registrar (1510 LSA; 764-6280).

Michigan sprinters Suzi Thweatt (2nd from left) and Michele Bishop (far right) race for the finish line at the
Red Simmons Invitational earlier this year. Thweatt, Bishop and the rest of the sprinters will open the
outdoor season in St. Louis this weekend.
Runners hope to shake off
cabin fever in outdoor season

goes west4
by Chris Carr
Daily Sports Writer
Once again, a Michigan team is
going to California to. compet4
against a Pac Ten opponent. How-
ever, this time it will not be the
Wolverine football team.
Instead, the men's track team
will compete in its version of the
"Rose Bowl" when 11 of its mem=
bers travel to Stanford to compete
in Big Ten-Pac Ten Challenge on
Saturday. The meet, the first of its
kind, will be a dual meet between
the two conferences.
"The meet was Stanford's
idea," Michigan assistant coach
Mike McGuire said. "It is a novel
concept, and they are trying to
drum-up interest with television)
coverage."
The meet will be covered bi
ESPN and PASS. Both networks
will air portions of the meet at -
later date.
In the field events, pole
vaulterstBrad Darr, Toby Van Pelt;
and Matt Scharel will represent
Michigan, along with high jumpers
Brad Holwerda and Dan Reddart
Seniors Warde Manuel and Al
Sarafian will compete in the
javelin. The meet will kick off the
Wolverines' outdoorrseason ano
give them their first real taste of
the caliber of Western competi-
tion.
"It will be interesting to com-
pete against teams we do not nor-
mally get the chance to," Darr said.
"It will also be nice to vault with
guys that I am normally competing
against, like Jimm Stack from Indi-
ana. He is a great vaulter."
"There is so much more I have
to deal with when I am jumping
outdoors," Holwerda said. "Tue
runway conditions and the weather
have a definite effect on my perfor-
mance."
In the running events, seniors
Jeff Barnett, Brad Barquist a1nd
Neal Newman along with junior
Jerry Douglas are expected to com-
pete. Douglas will run the hurdles,
and Barnett and Barquist will be in
the distance races.

by Jeff Williams
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan women's track
team may not be the next cover
story in Field and Stream, but after
last winter's indoor season,
Wolverine coach James Henry is
looking forward to the great out-
doors.
"We had a disastrous indoor
season," Henry said. "We are
down, but we're not out."
Henry has his Michigan team
prepared to open its outdoor season
at Washington University in St.
Louis.
The Wolverines also send
sophomore shot putter Julie Vic-
tor, and senior half-miler Amy
Bannister to compete at the Stan-
ford Invitational in Palo Alto,
Calif.
"They're really itching to get
into the season," Henry said. "We
have really worked hard after our

(indoor season) conference meet.
The majority of our team is strong,
and people are starting to get
healthy again."
The Wolverines' health was a
major question during the indoor
season. Due to illness and injury
problems, Michigan lost approxi-
mately 50 points at the Big Ten
Championships and finished
fourth.
"It was very discouraging,"
Henry said. "If any luck was be-
stowed to women's track, it was
bad luck. If we had good luck, we
would have finished one or two in
the Big Ten."
The Wolverines have lost the
services of senior distance runner
Mindy Rowand-Schmidt. Rowand-
Schmidt, the Big Ten 5,000- and
10,000-meter outdoor champion
last year. She was declared ineligi-
ble because she violated redshirting
rules during her rookie season.

"She is being penalized for the
administration misinterpreting the
rules ... it seems (the NCAA is)
stepping on her rights," Henry
said. "Losing her is a big blow. She
is a shoe-in for 20 points a meet.
We'll be looking for a number of
people to step forward and pick up
the slack."
Junior Suzi Thweatt and frosh
Richelle Webb are expected to ex-
cel in St. Louis. Both will compete
in the 100- and 200-meter sprints,
while Thweatt will also run the
100-meter hurdles.
Strong performances will also
be necessary from the Wolverines'
400-meter hurdle contingent of
Lisa Adams, Laura Jerman, and
Debbie Mann if the Wolverines are
to make a solid showing.
"We have high expectations,"
Henry said. "We should place in
the top three for every event we
contest."

I'
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J;

100

[JUST IS RISEN!I
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provide spiritually and intellectually If you would like a free copy of
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ask us or some other Christian
whom you know about the Sponsored by the
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