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March 29, 1991 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-29

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Friday, March 29, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson ELECTIONS

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Continued from page 1
Coalition running mates James
Green and Julie Davies won the ex-
ecutive leadership by a 10 percent
margin over the Common Sense
party led by assembly Vice
President Angie Burks.
MSA president-elect James
Green said, "I think that the stu-
dents have spoken pretty clearly.
Having CC as a majority on the as-
VOTERS
Continued from page 1
"I'm definitely an apathetic
voter. I guess my experiences thus
far with student government is that
they don't get a whole lot accom-
plished anyhow. A part of it is be-
cause they are a rubber stamp orga-
nization," said LSA sophomore
Doyle Erickson.
"I don't think the administra-
tion takes MSA very seriously,"_

sembly is the culmination of three
years of work."
Sandra Dixon, one of the two
newly elected ESP Business School
representatives, said although she
was disappointed that more of her
party didn't win, she would work
with the executive leadership.
Current Rackham representative
Rochelle Davis was reelected on the
Common Sense ticket, but expressed
concern over the newly elected ex-

ecutive leadership.
"As someone who is active
the Peace and Justice Commission4A
really bothers me that (Green) will
attempt to abolish it," Davis said .
Melissa Saari, a CC candidalo
elected to an LSA seat, expressed
excitement about winning the eler
tion. "One of our main goals was
reform MSA, and I'm excited to
jump in and do that."','

_ 4;,

4--.

Dooder State College

LIKE a WAS SAYING, VAL,
^/E COULD USE SOME OF
'liE MtONEY TO HELP
Ti STUDENTS. ISN'T
THAT WHAT THE STU-
D NT ASSEMBLY 6 FOR?
f l

WE COULD SPONSOR
TEACH-INS ON ETHNIC
AND RACIAL ISSUES TO
PROMOTE HARMONY ON
CAMPUS, OR ANY NUMBER
OF BENEFICIAL THINGS!
ucrW, / ,

IT'S ABOUT TIME WE
STARTED DEALING
WITH CAMPUS ISSUES,
INSTEAD OF POKING
OUR HEADS INTO F)R-
IEGW AND DOMESTIC
POLICY
\

by Alan Landau
YOU ARE A BIT TOO
RIGHT OF CENTER FOR
THE P.S.A., BENSAMIN,
AND AS ITS PRESIDENT I
RECOMMEND YOU BE IM-
PEACHED! Y
* i

Erickson added.
"I just did not have a chance to
vote at all. I really didn't even think
about it. I think there isn't enough
information about MSA," said
School of Art sophomore Jennifer
Levin.
"I actually was never at a
polling site at a convenient time,"
said LSA sophomore Lynn Blunt.
Others attributed reasons for not
voting to an overall dissatisfaction
with MSA and how it represents

students.
LSA junior Amy Houck who
was personnel director for MA
elections last winter term said
"I'm just turned off by the whdol
MSA system. The representatives
don't seem to actually represent tue
students."
"I think MSA is trivial. I thins
it's just a bunch of students ona
power trip just babbling among's
themselves," said Linda Urich,.
Rackham engineering student.
strike down two years ago, Simbi
said the problem of racism does not*
justify compromising constitu
tional rights.
He called any attempt to deal
with racism by infringing on First'
Amendment rights a "superficia
misleading, and ultimately useless
way of addressing the issue df"
racism."

SIMON
Continued from page 1
"I don't believe Bush ever asked
them how they would rule on Roe
v. Wade. I do believe Sununu asked
them," he said.
Because of this, the ACLU has
fought in state courts laws such as
Michigan's ban on medicaid-funded

abortions, overturned last month,
and its new law requiring minors to
acquire parental consent before get-
ting an abortion, Simon said.
A judicial decision on an injunc-
tion against the parental consent
law is expected today.
In response to a question about
the University's anti-harassment
policy, which the ACLU helped

U U

6ELLEAS 5ND 9VELISANDE

l ?

r-

--f
' ,
:.
4
ti

An adaptation of Maeterlinck's
classic love tragedy
Trueblood Theatre
Apr. 4 - 6, 11 - 13 at 8 PM;
Apr. 7, 14at 2 PM
Tickets: $9 general admission
Students $5 with ID at " IIk 0
the League Ticket Office. l l

SOVIETS
Continued from page 1
ganizers pleaded through bullhorns
for people to back off.
People leaned out windows and
stood on phone booths, trucks and
kiosks. Tens of thousands of demon-
strators lined the closed-off streets
in the center of the capital. Police
estimated the crowd at 100,000; or-
ganizers claimed 500,000. Because
the crowd spilled onto side streets,
it was impossible to make a more
comprehensive estimate.
In late afternoon, before the
scheduled rally, about 500 people
broke through light metal barriers
onto Manezh Square. But after 45

minutes, police and soldiers gently
moved them from the area. Warned
to avoid confrontation and violence,
the demonstrators complied.
The protest came at the end of a
tense day in Moscow, with last-
minute appeals to Gorbachev to call
off the troops to prevent any blood-
shed. The official news agency Tass
reported hospitals on alert to treat
casualties. Armored personnel car-
riers were sighted at a base three
miles from the Kremlin.
As hundreds of military trucks
and thousands of troops poured into
the streets around the Kremlin, the
Russian parliament, meeting inside,
declared Gorbachev's ban on demon-
strations unconstitutional.

RALLY
Continued from page 1
Other speakers echoed Hunter's
reluctance to trust law enforce-
ment officers' ability to monitor
their own actions.
"How many of us would have
believed the Rodney King incident
if there were no videotape?" asked
Jamal Young, second-year Rackham
student. "The problem that we
have is that by nature, the police are
faulty people... We are dealing
with a heartless, soulless enemy,"
Young added.
Recently, an amateur video tap-
ing captured the Los Angeles po-
lice beating of Rodney King, a
Black man accused of running sev-
eral red lights and resisting arrest.
Other rally speakers focused on
the lack of attention given to prob-
lems specific to Blacks and other
minority groups on campus.
First-year LSA student Tonya
Clowney urged Black students to
join in the fight to eliminate the
neglect.

"I'm very disappointed with,
the Black masses. You've beenr
dogged the whole time you've been
here. I'm disappointed that you
haven't been active consistently?
she said.J-
Clowney suggested that stuj*
dents were "accepting the 40 acre
and a mule" by not making more
strident demands of thej
University. Jill
First-year LSA student Richard
Clay, using Braille-.typed trai-,
scripts to speak, criticized tbo
University for attempting to di7
vide Concerned Students' power. ,:
"The University dissed them. ,1
They tried to work with student
groups like BGA (Black Greek
Association) to solve this prob-
lem. They know damned well th
the group supporting students on
-this issue is Concerned Students:
The pressure is most definitely ofl
And believe it or not, the admini'
tration now wants to meet with is.
Isn't that a joke? Do we still wail
to meet with them?"
The crowd responded with a re-
sounding no.

'It I.

U

Wa MMICION

JUST OPENED
Drag out your history books and
you'll discover that John Allen and"
Elisha Rumsey were the two men,
with somewhat tarnished histories,
who founded Annarbour in 1824.
Life has become more complex in
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a I 1 o

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11I

SAVE THE HUMAN RECORD
- :L4th Annual Library Preservation Awareness Week
March 25-29
Preservation Awareness Week is observed annually by the UM Library in order to help make
people more aware of the deterioration and damage that threaten our library collections. Al-
though we focus on the issue publcly for just one week, the protection, repair and conservation of
library materials is a year-round concern at the UM and libraries everywhere.
NOW SHOWING
THE DRAMA!
THE SUSPENSE!
See these startling videos exclusively at the locations listed below:
'Slow Fires' (33 mnutcs) demonstrates how acidic paper is affecting library collections
worldwide, threatening our cultural and intellectual heritage. Don't miss it!
Slow Fires can be seen:
Mon., March 25, north lobby of the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Wed., March 27, Taubman Medical Library lobby, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Fri., March 29, south Lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 10 a.m.- p.m.
"Murder in the Stacks" (14 minutes) The legendary Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson
find intrigue and suspense in the library. See how improper care and handling
of books can severely damage library collections--books you need!
Murder in the Stacks can be seen:
Mon-Fri., March 25-29, Art & Architecture Library. Continuously available for viewing.
Just ask at the circulation desk.
Mon., March 25. north lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 10 a.m.- p.m.
Tues. March 26, lobby, Undergraduate Library, 10- a.m.-4 p.m.
Thurs., March 28, south lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
MAKING BOOKS THE OLD FASHIONED WAY!
See trained professionals from the University Library's Conservation Unit demonstrate the fine
art of hand-sewing a book. Also on display will be samples of books in various stages of the
binding process. Demonstrations will be held:
Mon., March 25, lobby, Undergraduate Library, 10 a.m.-Noon
Wed., March 27, north lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-Noon
Thurs., March 28, reference room, Taubman Medical Library, 10 a.m.-Noon
Fri., March 29, lobby, North Campus Commons, 1I1 a.m.-1 p.m.

\I

Kappa Alpha sororitt partyin the South Q d afetea:
: Students file c plaints of unnecessa:. police rutity t
A Ar bo4tk r POlice...:........
deman n
*Universit fficalsrec eiv lac S entUrtion's $SU) frl ::
comnp laint
Jan 23: nterim nvrsty e rident tdeA
Ann Swain refpses t Iconfirm fl lc ad p s.0
d at es for st dentdacmsa ettn d scussQo,.
Feb 22: AnnArborPoliceannounetiha(ue of Mace wa' jusoe
but atre unable to Identify officersg who ade ratlslyrs
Mar.:1: SProposes newtimesfor meeting ith Uiverst
Presidert James Dudrstadt at SouthQuad o rTrotterHouse
Mar.8 d+ rstadt sends lOtte ;:Qi kny to BI. k f IEs nt 1d>r:.
along with a summarytofreposp rts onthe inident issuedby
Univ ersityHourin. Security, the7Dopat-tnenr .f $f C : dSezr
St
<Mar.::>4<27:>:Cs meets:.wiith ayorGald Jerniga :............
Mar:1:7:ACSdvewtt.Lvy/iaAiLYtGhAUePs
Yesterday:.CSra lles for sUp POT on Aaq
Andrew M.Levy/DAILY GRAPHI~

ljE £ITrbTjau 1 ZI~iI

a-

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News: Chris Afendulis, Lad Barager, Jami Blaauw, Marc Ciagne, Lynne Coln, Laura DePompolo, Brenda Dickonsen, Julie
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Weekend: Jonathan Chat, Scott Chupack. Noah Finkel, Larry Hu, Erica Kohnke, Eric Lemont, Adam Levine, Craig Linne, Jesse
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