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March 19, 1991 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-19

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Page 10-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 19,1991

WRESTLING NOTEBOOK
Big en wrestlers
dominate NCAAs
by Josh Dubow
Daily Sports Writer
IOWA CITY - During last weekend's NCAA Wrestling Champi-
onships, the Big Ten once again proved itself as the the dominant con-
ference in collegiate wrestling. Led by first place Iowa, the Big Ten had
four of the top 10 teams and seven of the top 20 teams.
Individually, the Big Ten had five of the 10 champions, 10 of the fi-
nalists, and 24 of the 80 All-Americans. Its most dominant weight classes
were 134 and 167 pounds, where the conference placed three of the top
four wrestlers.
The Big Ten's dominance went beyond Iowa, as Wisconsin, Minnesota
and Illinois all had champions. Michigan, Ohio State, Northwestern, and
Purdue also had All-Americans.
In past years, the Big 8 has rivaled the Big Ten. But this year, only
five Big 8 schools qualified wrestlers, and the Big Ten outdistanced the
Big 8 in composite score, 358-219.
With Penn State's addition to the conference, the Big Ten's dominance
should increase. The Nittany Lions placed third, with six All-Americans
and one national champion.
SUCCESSFUL YOUTH: Of the 20 finalists last weekend, 16 will re-
turn next year, including the Outstanding Wrestler of the Championships,
Jeff Prescott of Penn State. Four other champions - Iowa's Tom Brands
and Mark Reiland, Wisconsin's Matt Demaray, and Pat Smith of
Oklahoma State will also return. Smith and Brands are both two-time
champions, and Smith has a chance to be the first wrestler to win four
national championships.
UP IN THE AIR: Pat Smith's championship is not yet official, as
his eligibility is still pending a court decision due April 19. Smith was
ruled academically ineligible in February, but filed for, and received, a
court injunction saying that Oklahoma State should have declared him
learning disabled. If Smith loses his title, Iowa's Tom Ryan would
become champion. Iowa would then break its Championship point record.

Calip honored at
basketball dinner

by Jeff Sheran
Daily Basketball Writer
Demetrius Calip garnered both
the Bill Buntin Most Valuable
Player and the Thad Garner Lead-
ership Awards at the annual
"Basketball Bust" dinner last night
at Crisler Arena.
As the lone senior and team
captain, Calip received a special
video tribute that highlighted his
final season, during which he led
all Wolverine scorers, averaging
over 20 points per game.
"It's a great feeling of accom-
plishment to have high expecta-
tions set for you and to fulfill
them," Calip said. "The fulfillment
is exemplified only by how great I
feel right now."
James Voskuil earned the Rudy
Tomjanovich Most Improved
Player Award, after beginning the
season with a sidelining foot injury
and concluding as Michigan's
starting forward, averaging 6.9
points per game. The 6-foot-7
sophomore had suffered from nu-
merous injuries and illnesses until
his return in January.
"I'm really honored," Voskuil
said. "It shows that if you just work
at a singular aspect, things work
out and you don't have to worry
about statistics."
The Steve Grote Hustler Award
went to 6-foot-5 junior Freddie
Hunter, who walked on the squad
last fall and eventually earned a

Michigan center Eric Riley blocks Colorado's Shaun Vandiver's shot in first-
half action of Michigan's 71-64 NIT loss last week in Boulder, Coo.

U

starting role at forward. Hunter
posted 4.6 rebounds per game.
"I never even knew what a bu*
was," Hunter said. "This whole
setup, with all the people and
videos and all, and to win this
award - I just feel wonderful."
Michigan coach Steve Fisher,
who honored each Wolverine
player briefly, explained that no
award was given for the year's best
comeback player. However, he
added that any such award woulc
clearly belong to Kirk Taylor, who -
recovered from a career-threaten-
ing knee injury last year to share
starting duties in the backcourt.
Lest he go home empty-handed,
Taylor received the Wayman Britt
Defensive Player award. The 6-
foot-4 junior frequently bore the
defensive brunt of the opponent's
top scorer, including conference
and national standouts such a*
Steve Smith (Michigan State),
Calbert Cheaney (Indiana), and
Jimmy Jackson (Ohio State).
"It's definitely a bit of a payoff
for having to guard those guys. But
no doubt, I'll have the MVP award
next year," Taylor joked.
The Michigan players voted for
each award's recipient except for
the Rebounding Award, won by
center Eric Riley. Riley totalled
8.4 boards per game, and finished
second in the Big Ten to Wiscon-
sin's Patrick Tompkins in that cat-
egory.
Women
skiers place..
12th at
nationals
by Jeff Williams
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan women's ski
team traveled to Mt. Bachelor in
Bend, Ore., last week to compete
in the National Collegiate Ski As-
sociation Championships. The.
Wolverines found great weather
but unfamiliar ski conditions.
"We were not used to the terrain
of the mountain courses," rookie
Renee Huckle said. "The runs are so
much longer than anything in
Michigan. A lot of us felt our legs
burning at the bottom."
The Wolverines placed 12th in
the 16-team field. Sierra-Nevada was
the top finisher, followed by Central
Oregon Community College, and
Western State (Colo.).
"We didn't ski up to our poten-
tial," senior co-captain Joanna
Marquardt said. "We felt like we
could have ended up in the top 10 if
we performed well there."
Marquardt, was the highest
Wolverine finisher in the giant
slalom, garnering 14th place with a
combined time of 2:51.64. She
finished 38th in the slalom, despite
slipping during the race.
"I was really pleased with the
giant slalom," Marquardt said. "We
consider the slalom to be our best
event though, and we didn't do so
well in it."
The Wolverines were led in the
slalom by Ashley Andreae's 31st-

place time of 2:00.34. In addition to
Marquardt's difficulties in the event,
Lisa Witty also slipped during one
of her runs. Witty finished 38th,
with a time of 2:03. 73.
Janja Lupse of Sierra-Nevada
finished first in both events to claim
the individual championship.
"The runs are a lot different than
Michigan," Marquardt said. "The
speed you're carrying down the
mountain is much greater than it is
here. It's a lot harder to control
yourself on the turns."
Michigan's problems were not
limited to the conditions on the
mountain. As a club team, the
Wolverines had to compete against
schools which offer skiing as a@
varsity sport.
The Michigan men's ski team
was also slated to compete in Ore-
gon. At the NCSA Regional
Championships the Wolverines fin-
ished in a tie for third placeawith
Western Michigan. Through a tie-
breaking procedure, Michigan was
originally given the final berth in
the NCSA Championships.

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