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January 14, 1991 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-01-14

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 14, 1991 - Page 11

Women swimmers
victorious in Hawaii

by Yoav Irom
When the Michigan women's
swimming team visited the warm
shores of Hawaii, they had work, not
rest, on their minds. The Wolverines
arrived focused on training hard for
their meets.
Michigan first swam against the
Hawaii Rainbows Dec. 30, and came
away with an impressive victory. En*
route to a 139-66 victory, junior
isa Anderson claimed victories in
e 200-meter backstroke, 200 indi-
vidual medley and was a part of the
winning 400 medley relay team.
Karen Barnes, Jennifer Love and
Michelle Swix also turned in stellar
performances with first, second and
third place finishes in various
events.
Three days later, Michigan com-
peted in the Rainbow Invitational, a
rteen-team competition including
ig Ten rivals Iowa and Wisconsin,
and powerhouse Arizona State.
The Wolverines led the pack
after the first day of competition
with the closest competitor, Arizona
State, trailing by a wide margin of
34 points. During the two-day com-
petition, Michigan exhibited a
tremendous effort, placing first in

the overall competition while also
improving its record to 5-0.
Lisa Anderson led all scorers with
30 points and two more first-place
finishes. Anderson has been named
the Big Ten women's swimming and
diving athlete-of-the-month for
December.
4 men compete
in Australia
On the men's front, at the World
Swimming Championships Friday
night in Perth, Australia, Michigan
star Mike Barrowman lowered his
own world record in the 200-meter
breaststroke for the third time. While
leading the fastest heat ever in this
event, Barrowman topped his previ-
ous record by three-tenths of a sec-
ond, dropping the mark to 2 min-
utes, 11.23 seconds.
Other Wolverines in Australia in-
cluded Brent Lang, Eric Namesnik
and Eric Wunderlich. Lang was part
of the United State's gold medal-
winning 4x100 freestyle relay team,
Namesnik took the silver in the 400
individual medley and Wanderlich
placed 5th in the 100 breaststroke.

FCOURT 7'
UL
LLPRESS
Super subs are key to
success for 'Icagers
by Matthew Dodge
Daily Basketball Writer
Behind every good Wolverine starter, there is a great sub.
Michigan's five principle backups proved that yesterday as Michigan's
women's basketball team stomped Wisconsin, 90-69, at Crisler Arena. The
visitors held Michigan's leading-scorer, captain Carol Szczechowski, to only
nine points - her lowest total in seven games. But the Wolverine bench.
proceeded to pick up the pace and gun the offensive engines all game.
"Stopping (Szczechowski) was a key for us," Badger coach Mary Murphy
said. "But the subs played such that she didn't need to score. They never-
missed a beat when they went to the bench."
One Wolverine kept the beat pumping when some of her teammates were
playing as if they were listening to an Anita Baker song. Sophomore point
guard Stacie McCall came off the pine to score a career-high 14 points in
only 19 minutes.
McCall and starting point guard Leah Wooldridge form one of the most
versatile guard tandems in the conference. The styles of the two form a starkd
contrast. McCall plays a full-throttle, catch-me-if-you-can brand of basket-
ball. Wooldridge prefers to slow the pace.
"They are very different players," Murphy said. "Leah is more of an out-
side threat; we know she is a good shooter from the point. McCall likes to
drive to shoot the ball."
"Stacie's play was great today," Michigan coach VanDeWege said. "Leah-
did not have a good first half. Stacie just came in and lit the place up. She
brought energy, movement, and scoring. She set a great tone, and was ready,.
to pick other people up."
VanDeWege took some of the scoring load off Szczechowski by insert-
ing shooting guard Jennifer Nuanes (11 points). This allowed Szczechowski
to move to small forward and help front line subs LaTara Jones and Nikki
Beaudry clean the boards.
VanDeWege made a big move Friday by placing the 6-3 Michelle Hall in"
the starting lineup over the 5-11 Beaudry. This gives Michigan its own ver-
sion of the Twin Towers - starting forward Trish Andrew is 6-2 - while
giving the high-scoring Beaudry a chance to size up the opponent's defense. ;11
"I have no problems with coming off the bench," Beaudry said. "I can see
what Michelle and Trish are doing, and see what I need to do. It helps to
watch; I can focus in on the game."
If the Michigan backups continue to play well, the team may soon shake
up the Big Ten standings. A better team chemistry is needed before the
Wolverines can compete with perennial conference leaders, but VanDeWege
just may have found the perfect mix.
"It's too early in the season to tell," VanDeWege said. "I don't have
trouble using a lot of players, but they have to come ready to play. We need
to get into a consistent rotation. Hopefully, this is the beginning of it."

Michigan center Trish Andrew battles Badger Peggy Shreve for a loose
ball during Sunday's victory. Andrew led the Wolverines with 16 points.

Fencers finish fourth

but remain
by Ryan Herrington
Deily Sports Writer
During the ride home from
Columbus Saturday afternoon, the
Michigan fencing club had mixed
eelings. The euphoria of beginning
the collegiate season was somewhat
dampened by the day's fourth-place
fifish. Yet, the mood was not that
of dejection but one of optimism.
On top of the list of positives
was the performance of first-year
fencer Jeff White. In his first colle-
giate meet, White defeated the top
fencer from Northwestern, 5-1, and
the top fencer from Illinois, regarded
*as the top fencer in the entire meet,
-0. White was clearly Michigan's
best performer in Columbus.
The Wolverines went into the
seven-team field uncertain as to how
well they would perform due to the
fact they had. not held practice in

optimistic
more than a month.
The lack of practice was not the
only difficulty facing the fencers.
Each squad which beat them was a
varsity team rather then a club team
like the Wolverines. The varsity
teams have much more experience
than those of club sport status.
Ohio State, the host school,
proved to be the class of the tourna-
ment, as it took first place, followed
closely by Northwestern.
The Wolverine fencers swept
Purdue in all four classes - men's
foil, women's foil, sabre and epee -
and defeated Miami (Ohio) in all but
the epee class. Illinois and Michigan
State both did not bring a women's
foil team to the meet, but were vic-
torious in the other classes against
the squad from Ann Arbor. Michigan
also lost in all four classes to
Northwestern and Ohio State.

CAGERS
Continued from page 1
momentum going in our favor and
clearly established the flow of the
game," VanDeWege said.
Wisconsin made a brief run in the
second half, but with 9:17 remain-
ing, and down by only seven,
Wisconsin's Robin Threatt was
whistled for an intentional foul and
disqualified when she slammed
Michigan's Nikki Beaudry to the
floor. Wisconsin seemed distracted
and never threatened again.
The disqualification was the re-
sult of a physical game, complete
with flying elbows, body checks and
fighting words.
"I don't think anybody likes to

play as physical a game as that one,"
Badger coach Mary Murphy said.
The keys for Michigan Sunday
- a balanced attack, aggressive de-
fense and quick hands - were the
missing ingredients Friday night,
when Michigan suffered an 88-61 de-
feat to a visiting Northwestern squad
(9-3, 2-1). At the half, the two
teams were deadlocked at 36-36, but
the Wildcats outpaced the Wolver-
ines in the second half to make it
look easy.
Notable in Friday night's game
were Andrew's four blocked shots,
which increased her career total to
111, breaking the Michigan record of
108 previously held by Patrice Don-
ovan. With another block against
Wisconsin, Andrew is up to 112.

M

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