100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2--The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 12, 1991

RESCOMP
Continued from page 1
nient to have it in the dorm than to
go to Angell Hall."
First-year Nursing student Lu-
anne Robinson also voiced con-

cern.
"Probably, I wouldn't feel too
good. It would be harder to get
papers done. I'd probably have to
walk across campus late at night,
and I don't usually feel safe doing
that," Robinson said.

Havlicek, however, offered
some hope.
"If students get together and
show support for ResComp, they
can make a difference by trying to
push for what they feel is im-
portant," he said.

Calvin and Hobbes

IRAQ
Continued from page 1
He also urged the government
to legalize political parties, inde-
pendent labor unions and student
organizations, and allow women to
vote.
In a news conference, Ghanim
al-Najjar, an editor of a Kuwaiti
daily newspaper who was held
hostage in Iraq for two weeks,
said, "I think the international
community which supported the

liberation of. Kuwait must support
the democratization of Kuwait."
Kuwait's crown prince and
prime minister, Sheik Saad al-Ab-
dallah al-Sabah, said last week
that Kuwait was on the path to-
ward greater democracy.
"We are not satisfied with
vague concepts like widening pop-
ular participation," al-Hebari said,
demanding a date for elections.
Al-Hebari said he was worried
that the crown prince's martial law
order, issued last week, would be

AN~ DA.D, 1OBBS SWS U'M
nGERS AE MMP~jcru{
6NiOVY14E N'4UMNKS !
12 4

H~E SMS T I F 'ME PL I'NG
~D# NVE GUNS,PEOPLE
WWO'LD BE tNON NG BUT CkT
FOOD! TUAL W TA Ts NOT...

71

o . *
9a
* 9 9
Si
L

by Bill Watterson
W~E BET
ThRE.' QUARTER
o CENS . OU Cv-$ASE R .
by Alan Landau
0

used to squelch the pro-democracy
movement.
"We hope it is innocent," he
said, "but we have our suspicions
that it is meant to reimpose the
rule of the government that fled
the country."
He said the martial law orde4
was illegal because it was issued
without Parliament being in ses-
sion. Under the 1962 Constitution,
Parliament must continue sitting
while martial law is in effect.
States could widen its role in the
region's security:
A few dozen Air Force fight-
ers could train out of air bases in
Saudi Arabia or other friendly gul4
nations for a few months at a time,
leave and be replaced by another
squadron.
A small Central Command
headquarters staff might remain in
Riyadh, or elsewhere on the Saudi
peninsula.

order, issued last week, would be

ISRAEL
Continued from page 1
Palestinian delegation while
carefully ruling out a renewal of
talks with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Arriving in Jerusalem yester-
day, he pledged to "work just as
hard as we can to see if we can
provide a peace between Arabs
and Israelis."

Whether providing that peace.
will stipulate changes in the
United States' military presence in
the Middle East is a sensitive is-
sue in Saudia Arabia, where oppo-
nents say the monarchy would be
bowing to Western colonial inter-
ests if it agrees to a heightened
foreign military presence.
Based on analyses by current
and retired military officials, here
are some of the ways the United

Dooder State College
ThEAT HOUSE iS FORGET!
GREAT! I'D LOVE A NICE PLACE
TO LIVE THERE LIKE THAT 15 FOR - L
NEXT YEAR! HUMAN BEINGS.
- -rt'

WHAT ARE WE?

WE'RE $TVDENIS5.
HOUS ES FOR US.
z J
o0

WESTEN
Continued from page 1
fair/fare, the majority of the half
that plugged their ears thought of
the spelling 'fair' while the major-
ity of those on the other side who
had heard the word 'taxi cab'
thought of the spelling 'fare.'
Westen said, "What do you
know, it works. This is a
diagnostic test for identifying
illiterates," Westen said. "You
can get tenure for doing studies
like this."

Westen explained that the
people who heard the word 'taxi
cab' associated it with the less
preferred spelling of the word
'fare'.
Dr. Westen will be leaving the
University at the end of this term.
He said he's not sure where he is
going, but warm weather is high
on the list of criteria.
"I'm going to miss Michigan a
lot," Westen said. "This is a.
place where I could have seen
spending my career. The students
are great, the faculty is excellent.
Hey, so is the football team."

i

I

ooNoj
MASS

I I~

I

II

The Medical School Information Fair
Saturday, March 16
10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.M.
Michigan Union

Admissions Deans' Panel
Anderson Room
Information Fair
Pendleton Room

10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

The MichiganEnsian Yearbook
is currently accepting applications
for the position of
Editor-in-Chief
for the 1992 MichiganEnsian.
Anyone interested is encouraged to apply.
Applications may be picked up at our office
located in the Student Publications Building,
420 Maynard St.
Applications must be returned to the office
by Friday, March 15, 1991.
BE A LEADER!

AIAC
Continued from page 1
Concerning the issue of grant-
ing student groups immediate as-
sembly recognition, AIAC party
members say they would recognize,
any student group except ones that
advocated racist or fascist actions.
AIAC party members are confi-
dent about their chances of gaining
seats on the assembly.
"We're confident that our cam-
paign will... provoke thought in the
student body," Carmouche said.
"All candidates who apply for
tenure-track positions are considered
equal," said Gulari. "We give
(University graduates) a fair hearing,
and they are not discriminated
against."
The graduates were more quali-
fied to fill the college's vacancies
than the candidates with nor-Uni-
versity Ph.D.s, he said.
While he believes some depart-
ments at other universities have de-
teriorated after hiring a large propor-
tion of their own graduates, Gulari
said the College of Engineering will
continue to hire some of its own

Meet with representatives from:
The University of Chicago-Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine-
Case Western Reserve University-Indiana University-University of Illinois-
Loyola University of Chicago-Medical College of Ohio-University of
Michigan-Michigan State Unlversity-Vanderbilt University+Wayne State
University-University of Wsconsin*Wright State University
All students considering a career in medicine are welcome
Cosponsored with the Ui-.i i
Pre-Med Club Career Plannin Placnent

I

TENURE
Continued from page 1
In LSA, there is a belief that fac-
ulty from other universities will
strengthen University programs, said
LSA Associate Dean for Academic
Appointments John Cross.
Erdogen Gulari, associate dean
for academic affairs for the College
of Engineering, said the college
would be better known around the
country if its graduates are distin-
guished faculty members at other
institutions.
Cross said that compared to se-
nior University faculty, there aren't
as many University doctoral gradu-
ates within the junior faculty ranks.
He added that during the 1960s and
1970s, the University hired more of
its graduates to meet increased stu
dent enrollments.
Jyotirmoy Sarkar, a visiting
assistant statistics professor and
University graduate, said that
although he cannot earn tenure, he's
in favor of the University's
unwritten policy. He added that a
graduate will be able to put his or
her knowledge to better use at
another institution.
"It's not a good idea for places to
hire their own doctoral graduates
immediately," Economics Prof. Ed-
ward Gramlich said. "It's always
possible later on, if our graduates do.
well (at other institutions) to bring
them back here."
Doctoral graduates not on the
tenure-track are hired as an adjunct
or visiting assistant professor, lec-
turer, or instructor. Their positions
are temporary, under contracts
which must be renewed annually.
Granting assistant professorships
to doctoral graduates would imply
that they were on a tenure track,
Cross said.
The College of Engineering,
however, has hired three graduates
into tenure-track positions since
1988.

SC"
-,I
DON
" we
" shui
sanc
Ssita
DO:
" take
A wor
*"ass
" wor
" mak
* face
" perf
phy
+ inte
INJO
wor
actin
i takir
7
'a
NFOF
Date:
Time:
Mlace:
INTES
Date:h
dace:
base an

ILUMBERGER FIELD
NOINEERS
1'T:
ar suits and ties
ffle papers
swer phones all day
at a desk
e charge
k long hours
ume heavy responsibility
k outdoors
ke decisions
e many challenges and risks
form data acquisitions and measurements of
sical properties of subsurface formationsf
rpret that information
)Y:
king with a great deal of autonomy
ng on an idea and risk carrying it to fruition
ng pride in a job well done
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
(and other engineering disciplines)
GEOSCIENCES
APPLIED SCIENCES
RMATION MEETING:
March 14, 1991
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm:
G. Brown, Room 1504
RVIEWING:
March 15, 1991
Please check with Placement Office
NOTE: openm aD intresled student W r attendance at
nation Meeing s a prerequiste to our intenviwing process
iend. Casual attlR
Exceptional People.
Exceptional Technology.
Worldwide. -
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Help fill in the blanks
for incoming students!
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
Fall Orientation Leader
Paid Employment from August 31 to September 4, 1991

'All candidates who
apply for tenure-track
positions are
considered equal. We
give (University
graduates) a fair
hearing, and they are
not discriminated
against'
- Erdogen Gulari
College of Engineering
graduates unless it becomes a
widespread problem.
However, administrators ac-
knowledged that not hiring the Uni-
versity's own minority doctoral
graduate students could conflict with
the University's goal of hiring more
minority faculty.
Dolan-Greene said the University,
has the second or third largest num-
ber of minority doctoral graduates in
the country. She added that prohibit-
ing them from being placed on the
tenure track would conflict with the
goals of the Michigan Mandate.
Dolan-Greene added that the
Council on a Multicultural Univer-
sity has discussed ideas for creating
new opportunities for minority grad-
uates at other institutions, while
making possible long-term profes-
sional careers at the University.

All Applicants,
* March 13 at
" March 14 at
" March 17 at:

Must Attend One of the Following Preview Sessions
5:00 PM at the International Center, West Quad
5:00 PM at the International Center, West Quad
3:00 PM at the International Center, West Quad

For More Information or Application Materials Contact
The Office of Orientation
3011 Student Activities Building
(313) 764-6290
Applications due March 18, 1991 by 12:00 PM (NOON)

Not Your

0I

- IALTUESI
Get one large, on
pizza for only
$499
N ;clciti n al t p pin 5 5 .I h tP
Valid Tuesdays 1
OPE N DA II.IL R L L*N(1It

)AY!
e-topping

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the College Press Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

'0

+ tax.

EDITOFAAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Munaging Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editors
Associate Editor
Weekend Editor
Associte Editor
Weekend Arts Editor
Photo Editors

Andrew Gottesman Sports Editor
Josh M inick Assodsate Editors
Philp Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Donna Woodwell Arts Editors
Stephen Henderson, Dan Poux Books
Mike Fisdher Film
Gi Renberg Fins Arts
Josephine Balenger Muic
Tony Siber Theater
Jose Juarez, Ken Smdier List Editor

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Pil Green,
Jeff Sheran, Dan Zoch
Mark Binell,Annette Petrusso
valere Shuman
Brent Edwards
Elizabeth Lenhard
Peter Shepro
Mary Beth Barber
Christine ioostra

0
S

)CI itCni1
nly

9.

- --- --- -- - -I""
S30 CPEPSI
! rCr T )rC !I

761-1111
N IR I CA MIPL '
769-5511

News: Chris AMendulis, Lai Barager, Jami Blaauw, Marc Ciagne, Lynne Chn, Laura DePomnpolo, Brenda Dickinsn, Jule
Foster, Jay Garcia, Henry Goldbatt, Shalini Patel, Melissa Peerless, Tai Polak, David Rheingold, Behany Robertson, Sarah
Schweitzer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jesse Snyder, Stefanie Vines, Ken Waiker, Garrido Wang.
Opinion: Russell Balimore, Brad Bernalek, Geoff Earle, David Leitner, Jennifer Mattson, Amitava Mazumda, Brad Miller, Chris
Nordstrom, Manuel Olave, Chales Rousseau, Katie Sanders, Glynn Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Jason Bank, Chris Car, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Mathew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jm Foss, Mike Gill,
Jason Gornberg, Ryan Herrington, David Hyman, Yoav Irom, David Kraft, Eric Lemon;,Albert Un, Rod Loewenhal, Adam Lutz,
Adam Miler, John Niyo, Mich Rubenstein, David Schechter, Ryan Schreiber, Caryn Seidman, Rob Siegel, Eric Sklar, Tim
Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Kevin Sundman; Becky Weiss, Jeff Wiams, Charlie Wdle.
Arts: Greg Bise, Jen Bilk, liene Bush, Andrew J. Cahn, Beth CoiJlt, Jerne Dahimann, Rdiard S. Davis, Michael Pal
Fischer, Gregg Flaxman, Diane Frieden, Forrest Green III, Brian Jarvinen, Wike Kolody, Julie Komorn, Mike Kuniavsky, David
Lubiner, Mike Moliter, Kistin Palm, Jon Rosental, Mchael John Wison, Kim Yaged.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Antony M. Crd, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Kim Ganes, Kristoffer Giette, Michdele Guy, Rob
KroenertSuzane.Paley.
Weekend: Jonathan Chait Scott Chupack, Noah Finkel, Larry Hu, Erica Kohnke, Eric Lemont, Adam Levine, Craig Lnne, Jesse

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan