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March 07, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-07

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 7, 1991

01

GULF
Continued from page 1
reported in Tehran possibly to dis-
cuss Iraq's troubled south and other
postwar developments.
The U.S. military said President
Saddam Hussein's government ap-
parently regained control of rebel-
lious Basra. Refugees from that
southern Iraqi city said the loyalist
Republican Guard was executing
dissidents and scattering their bod-
ies in the streets to terrorize others.

It was announced yesterday that
Saddam had dismissed his interior
minister and appointed a cousin to
the post. The cousin, Ali Hassan
al-Majid, was governor of Kuwait
during the Iraqi occupation.
Various reports filtered in about
some three dozen Western journal-
ists said to be missing in southern
Iraq. Some telephoned their news
organizations to say they were all
right, others were reported in the
custody of the Republican Guard
and some were said to be under

the protection of opposition forces
in the south.
Army Staff Sgt. Crystal Rickett,
a chemical warfare specialist from
Detroit who had been missing in
action in the Gulf War, was re-
ported safe and back with her unit
yesterday.
A family member said Rickett
apparently joined other allied
forces after she became separated
from her own unit.

Calvin and Hobbes

AR OR MAR~i CkEETMA CAN
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C~LME T41N DORT PANE CARS,
OR ROCKETS, OR Bc*A8S,
OR NU 'JBAR.. ,.REACcc $,
CR.O.. MAN.

by Bill Watterson
AWD %dW A SEE SNKUMES
B rR At WW TITAN Now
CAN .'SIXT/MES/
WO Boy, TALK
AM T AGILTY

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Dooder State College

Programs help students
plan summers abroad
International Center offers workshop tomorrow

by Bonnie Bouman

I

HELLO CARTDN READER!
TODAY I TALKED WITH VAL
VANEY, PRESIDENT OF THE
DODDER STUDENT ASSEM-
BLY. LET'S SEE HOW IT
WENT.
At

THE GULF WAR IS JUST
ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF
OUR NATIONS SEXIST,
RACIST, AND HOMOPHO-
BIC TENDENCIES.
Aoh

AND THE ARMY 15 THE
TOOL USED BY OUR
FASCIST LEADERS TO DE-
STROY AND DEMORALIZE
MINORITIES, WOMAN,
AND HOMOSEXUALS!
J

by Alan Landau
AND You CAN TRUST HER
ON THAT! IT'S THAT
SIXTH SENSE THAT
GOT HER ELECTED!
z
°a f

If the war kept students
interested in going abroad from
finalizing their plans, they're now
going full speed ahead, even to
countries students don't normally
consider.
The International Center is
holding workshops on working,
volunteering, or studying around
the world, especially in Asia,
Africa and Latin America.
International Opportunities
Coordinator Bill Nolting said that,
on average, 20 people come into
the office each week asking for
information about these regions.
"Going abroad is great
anywhere, but Americans only
think of Europe," said peer advisor
Paul Benson, who spent a year
studying and working in Japan.
The staff wants to emphasize
the rewards from overseas
experiences in these "non-
traditional" areas.
"There aren't that many people
who go to Third World areas,"
Nolting said. "The individual
response is even more enthusiastic
than people who have been to
Europe."
One workshop, "Finding a Job
Around the World," which will be
held in the International Center
tomorrow, will feature several
speakers discussing employment
and study opportunities.
LSA junior Ted Sevransky, a
speaker at tomorrow's workshop,
spent two years working and
travelling in Europe and Africa.
"It's a different world," he said.
"It opens your eyes and changes
your perspective on life in this
country."
Sevransky said the viewpoint
he gained while travelling in
Africa was different from the

media's portrayal of famine, wars
and coups. "You can't get a grasp
on what someone's life is like
(from classes or the media)," he
explained. "It changed the way I
look at my own life, and enabled
me to have a greater empathy for
those less fortunate than myself."
After his return, Sevransky
created his own major,
International Development,
through LSA's Individual
Concentration Program.
"You have to be able to
recognize your Western biases and
confront them," he said. "Not just
to see but to understand that there
are [different] ways of thinking, not
better or worse, just different."
International Opportunities
Advisor Jeannine Lorenger said
there is a need for a specific
workshop on travelling to non-
traditional countries. "It's possible
to get a student work permit for
many European countries, but
there's no one single organized
way to find a job in the rest of the
world."
Organizers hope tomorrow's
workshop will fulfill that need by
informing participants about the
opportunities available.
Volunteering at summer work-
camps or the YMCA is an option
in most countries. Longer
commitments are also encouraged.
"You're not necessarily going
to go broke volunteering,"
Lorenger said. "The cost of living
in lots of these countries is lower,
so you can get by. The main
expense is getting over there."
Nolting, another speaker at
tomorrow's workshop, will discuss
opportunities such as scholarships

or internships. "A work or study
program which provides some
structure is very valuable," he
said, explaining that adjusting to
developing countries can be more
difficult for Americans.
Paying jobs can be found in
countries such as Japan, Korea,*
Taiwan and Hong Kong. "They
have stronger economies, and
there's always a demand for
people to teach English," Lorenger
said, adding that working in these
countries can be financially as
well as culturally rewarding.
Benson, another speaker at the
workshop, hopes to dispel myths
about Japan. "People have a lot of@
reservations about going to Asian
countries," he said. "It's a myth
that you need to speak the
language, that you need to be an
educated teacher to teach English,
that there's already too many
teachers. No matter what kind of
person you are you can find a job
in Japan."

"Finding a Job
World" will bet
International Center t
3 to 5 p.m.

Around
held in
omorrowf

the
the
from

I

*MOD EL FOR .
SPRING FASHION!'
(or else we will!)
Make men swoon and women kiss your feet! Bring your beautiful smile to
the second floor of the Student Publications Building on Thurday, March 7, at
4PM, along with any great snapshots that prove you're hot stuff on film.{
If you don't, well, you'll be sorry....
.. . : . : . .. .. . . ! : : : .. : . : . . . . :: : . . . . . . .. : ..x: : . :. . : . : . . ..:: . . . : . : : : : . : :

People interested in study
abroad programs in Africa, Latin
America and the Caribbean can
attend a meeting March 12 from
7:30 to 9 p.m. in 111 West
Engineering Building.
Sevransky offered advice for
students going to developing
countries: "Be ready to meet
people and talk, more than just
looking at monuments and
museums or laying on the beach,"
he said. "Be ready to have your
world shaken up."

Albanians flee crackdown

VIENNA, Austria (AP) -
Police fired warning shots
yesterday over the heads of
thousands of Albanians who
besieged Tirana's Embassy Row,
and 8,000 would-be emigres were
reported to have fled Albania.
Continuing unrest cast doubt on
the ability of either the ruling
Communists or opposition parties
contesting elections this month to
control popular discontent.
The exodus appears to reflect
mistrust of Albanian President
Ramiz Alia's promise to improve
political and economic conditions
in Europe's poorest nation.
About 8,000 Albanians were

reported to have left yesterday for
Italy after taking over ships in the
Adriatic port of Durres, an official
journalist said.
Police in Durres fired shots over
the heads of the would-be emigres,
but otherwise did not attempt to
stop the crowd, the journalist said.
On Tuesday, nearly 1,000
refugees arrived in southern Italy,
including a few who rowed across
the Adriatic with shovels. Early
yesterday, another 650 reached
Italian shores.
The Yugoslav news agency
Tanjug reported that up to 1,500
ethnic Serbs and Montenegrins
were trying to cross into

Yugoslavia from northern Albania.
They were stopped near the
frontier by Albanian border guards
and were awaiting permission from
authorities in both countries.
Diplomats speaking by
telephone from the Albanian
capital said thousands of people
gathered at the street housing
many western missions this
morning.
Dozens of armed police
guarded either end of Embassy
Row, the diplomats said.
Arben Puto, an Albanian
historian, suggested in another
telephone call that some of the
crowd had managed to get into
Embassy Row itself.

Palestinians beaten in revenge
for alleged Iraqi collaboration

KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait (AP)
- Kuwaiti army and resistance
personnel are beating scores of
Palestinians suspected of collabo-
rating with occupying Iraqi sol-
diers, hospital and resistance offi-
cials said yesterday.
Palestinians have been burned
with cigarettes, hit with typewrit-
ers and chairs and had their finger-
nails pulled out, according to those
familiar with the beatings.
At least 4,000 Palestinian and
other suspected collaborators have
been jailed since last Wednesday,
according to resistance officials
manning three police stations.
"What we are giving them is
nothing compared to what we got
from the Iraqis," said Aziz Ghu-
loum, a resistance fighter in
charge of a police station in
Kuwait City.
A Palestinian medical student
at Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital
said five Palestinians with bullet
wounds to the head or chest have
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been brought to the hospital since
the Iraqi pullout.
Since then, he said he has
treated between 35 and 40 Pales-
tinians beaten up by the resistance
and the army, and heard of about

20 more cases.
Resistance fighters accused
their victims of denouncing mem-
bers of the resistance, profiting
from the Iraqi invasion by doing
business with the invaders.

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