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March 05, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-05

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 5, 1991 v

Iraqi security
cracks down
on protesters

A2 City council
tables proposal
defining 'family''

SAFWAN, Iraq (AP)- Iraq's
Republican Guard launched a fierce
crackdown on protesters demand-
ing the overthrow of Saddam Hus-
sein and the establishment of an
Islamic republic in Iraq, witnesses
said yesterday.
The Guard was reported to be
turning some of its remaining
tanks and guns on the demonstra-
tors, who are apparently disgusted
with Saddam's handling of the
Gulf War and sense that he may be
vulnerable.
There were reports of protesters
killing government officials, in-
cluding the mayor of Basra, a gov-
ernor, and a son of Saddam.
Witnesses said demonstrations
had erupted in at least eight Iraqi
cities, stretching from Iraq's sec-
ond-largest city, Basra, to the holy
city of Kerbala in central Iraq.
They said that in some places the
Iraqi troops were shooting women
and children.
"The special forces are destroy-
ing everything in front of them. If
anybody shouts from a building
they knock it down," said Mahar-
Hakawati, 24, a Jordanian photog-
rapher who came to Kuwait from*
Basra.
Refugees reaching this town
just north of Kuwait said demon-
strators were marching in

Nasiriyah, Shutra, Suq ash
Shuyukh, Imara, Samawah and
Kut, mostly in southern Iraq.
The Baath governor of
Nasiriyah was reportedly gunned
down by demonstrators and police
fought pitched battles with them
in the streets, refugees said.
"There was a lot of death. The
police were killing the opposition,
and there were many injured on
both sides," said Ali Yacoub, a
32-year-old Kuwaiti policeman
sprung from a jail in Nasiriyah on
Sunday.
Witnesses here said demonstra-
tors in Basra have started carrying
portraits of Mohammad Bakr Al-
Hakim, a prominent Shiite cler-
gyman that runs an opposition
group from Iran.
Refugees said the uprising was
not confined to Shiites; they said
many people are simply tired of
Saddam.
"They want a new president.
He is a tyrant, a bloodsucker, a
warmonger," said Abu Mo-
hammed, a truck driver.
On Monday, a trickle of
refugees became a flood at this
wrecked border town. Vehicles
groaned under mattresses and other
household goods. Some refugees
fled with just the clothes on their
backs .

Crown Prince Saad AI-Sabah kisses the ground after deplaning at
Kuwait City International Airport yesterday as he returned from exile
following the war.

WORK- STUDY
Continued from page 1
only passing bills OK'd by the ma-
jority leader at the time (now Gov.
John Engler)," Jondahl said.
Stavenow said the current work-
study bill was jointly introduced in
the House and Senate to speed its

progress through the legislature.
"It just guarantees that it will
be taken up in both houses,"
Stavenow said. An identical bill
must be passed by both branches
of the legislature to become law,
but if the bill has already been re-
viewed in the Senate, it will be
easier to pass a similar House bill.
Stavenow said the legislature

eventually plans to move the
House bill through the Senate.
Jondahl said he is optimistic
about the bill's progress this ses-
sion based on its movement
through the House last year.
Stavenow, vice-chair of the
Senate Education Committee, said
the bill had strong support among
committee members.

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson

,I JUST SAW NA CO~MMECA
FO A LUXxR { CRUISE.
AOcY COME WE DO~t E
GoOc OACATQI~ONS LKETHAT?
4

VACATot1S tARE VL UST
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uUp

WE SPEND A 'eS(. IN COLD,
UNOMFORTALE TENTS E4c A
AFARS LNNG HERE - '"E
aREST OF TH TIMESEE.MS
SLK A .LUXUJR'{Y RSE. IF
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YciJR mm- ~LIF is A

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Dooder State College

by Alan Landau

TODAY TALKED WITH
STUDENTS WHO SUP-
PORT THE WAR. HERES
WHAT THEY THOUGHT.

ITHINK THE CONFLICT
IN SOUTH AMERICA 1
TOTALLY JUSTIFIED. WE
CAN'T LET...
R
A,
I .ot ~r

... THOSE COMMIES
CONTROL TKIS COUNTRY'S
COAL RESERVES. WITH

OUT IT..

F

...HOW CAN
WE RUN OUR
SOLAR GEN-
ERATORS?
-

THIS 1S5
SCARY.
l
DAIL

GULF
Continued from page 1
Schwarzkopf did not refer to other
demands made by the allies and
described in U.N. resolutions. He
said the two sides were prepared to
meet again but that no meeting had
been scheduled.
Witnesses described the mood of
the meeting as businesslike, with
Schwarzkopf mincing no words in
outlining the allied demands.
One source said the Iraqis were
"slightly arrogant, but obviously
wanting to get it over with."
The talks were held about three
miles north of the Kuwait border, in
an area where the desert begins to
turn to grassland. A pall of smoke
MSA
Continued from page 1
sion to Crisler Arena and the arrest
of the 16 students who held a sit-in
inside the Fleming Building last
semester.
MSA members will see the res-
olution for the first time at
DRAKE'S
Continued from page 1
Maurer said Tibbals didn't deny
he was kicking them out because
they looked like lesbians. Maurer
said she then told Tibbals if he
persisted she intended to organize a
boycott of the restaurant. She said he
didn't care and proceeded to throw the
women out.
The boycott is being called by
the Drake's Five and is endorsed by
the Women's Caucus and general
body of ACT-UP, and the Lesbian
and Gay Rights Organizing Com-
READ
THE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS.

by Lynne Cohn
and David Rheingold
Daily City Reporters
Ann Arbor city councilmembers
once again tabled making a deci-
sion on proposed amendments to
the existing family definition and
residential occupancy ordinance at
last night's council meeting.
The existing ordinance recog-
nizes the need to regulate residen-
tial dwelling situations to prevent
high density areas with little park-
ing space. It defines family as,
"An individual or group of individ-
uals occupying a dwelling unit...
in accordance with the residential
occupancy standards... "
Wendy Carman, a representa-
tive of the Orchard Hill Maple-
wood Homeowners Association, is
interested in three kinds of change
including limiting residential units
to six persons plus offspring.
A previous family definition, al-
lowing any number of family
members to coexist with a maxi-
mum of three non-relatives, was
ruled unconstitutional, creating the
need for a new definition.
The 1988 Ann Arbor census
showed an average of 2.45 persons
per household in Ann Arbor, with
an average of 1.95 adults. It also
found 97.8 percent of all house-
holds to have four or less adults
clung to the southern horizon where
70 to 80 oil wells, in one of
Kuwait's largest fields, burned out of
control.
Schwarzkopf and the allied Arab
commander, Saudi Lt. Gen. Khalid
bin Sultan, faced the Iraqis across the
small wooden table that had
notepads, teacups, two tape recorders
and a bottle of water for each
participant.
Other allied commanders - in-
cluding British Forces chief, Lt.
Gen. Sir Peter de la Billiere, French
Lt. Gen. Michel Henri Roquejeoffre,
and Arab officers - sat on metal
folding chairs behind the two top
allied leaders.
Meanwhile, President Bush in his
evening address to student winners of
a national science contest, praised
tonight's meeting. Some members
shared their preliminary thoughts.
LSA Rep. Lynn Chia believes
she would probably support a reso-
lution calling for open regents
meetings. "I think it would be
wonderful. The more things are
open, the better it is to resolve
conflicts," she said.
mittee's steering committee.
The groups demand that Tibbals
issue a public apology to the five
women, that he refund the cost of
the two women's beverages, and that
he donate $100 to the University's
Lesbian and Gay Male Programs Of-
fice for homophobia education.
Tibbals said he regularly asks
people who haven't ordered to leave,
and he has no intention of meeting
the boycott's demands.
Johanna Ouwehand, LSA senior
and manager of Drake's, said Tibbals
is in his mid-eighties, and doesn't
hear or see well.

and 99.1 percent with six or less
occupants.
An Ann Arbor attorney sug-
gested that Council could avoid
lawsuits and simplify this matter
by avoiding the attempt to define
family. He said the ordinance is
designed in part to keep students
out, and that if revised, it should
characterize density levels and lot
size instead of biological ties.
Ann Arbor residents
are concerned about
the threat of
increased noise,
trash, and parking
problems from
crowded conditions
and lack of space.
If passed, the definition could
restrict student housing areas, pos-
sibly preventing groups of more
than six students from living to-
gether in family-zoned areas.
Ann Arbor residents are prima
ily concerned about the threat of
increased noise, trash, and parking
problems from crowded conditions
and lack of space. They mentioned
a need to preserve open space
without confining recreation to
public parks.
high-technology U.S. weapons used
in the war and said of the U.S. men
and women in the Gulf: "The welfar
of our troopswas our top priority in
the war and as we forge a new peace,
all of them will be on our minds
until all of them are back home."
Bush told the 50th anniversary
banquet of the Westinghouse Science
Talent Search that the Persian Gulf
was the real-life testing ground for
"the high-tech equipment that has
served our military so well."
"Thank God that when the Scudh
came, the people of Israel and Saudi
Arabia had more to protect them
than some abstract theory of
deterrence," Bush said. "Go to
Riyadh or Tel Aviv. A theory didn't
protect its citizens. Patriot missiles
born of technology did."
Business School Rep. Steven
Kahl had doubts about supportin
the actions of the "New Regents".W
"To me (the "New Regent's"
actions) degrade the student gov-
ernment," Kahl said. "I think it
was kind of childish. They don't
accomplish much like that."
"How could he tell if they were
gay if he didn't even know they were
women?" Ouwehand said.
Myra Geffer, RC sophomore,
was working at Drake's when the in-
cident occurred and subsequently quit
her job.
"I've never seen him kick anyone
out before," Geffer said after working
for over a month with Tibbals.
"I think it's very ironic that part
of the reason people go to Drake's is
because it's so quaint and charming
and old fashioned, and part of tha@
old fashioned charm is the homo-
phobia and sexism," Geffer said.

a
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D
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s a t t s

I % i I

--.w

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MODEL FOR
SPRING FASHION!
(Of else we Will!)
Make men swoon and women kiss your feet! Bring your beautiful smile to
the second floor of the Student Publications Building on Thurday, March 7,
4PM, along with any great snapshots that prove you're hot stuff on film.
If you don't, well, you'll be sorry....

Ediad 94 ailu
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