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February 11, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-11

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, February 11, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson GULF

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Continued from page 1
Taking advantage of improving
weather, American warplanes flew
2,800 missions yesterday, concen-
trating on Republican Guard troops
on the Iraqi-Kuwaiti border and the
bridges, highways and railways used
to supply them.
The fierce action in the air, and
sporadic exchanges of artillery along
the Saudi border, came as Cheney

headed back to Washington to brief
President Bush on the progress of
the 25-day-old war.
He told reporters flying home
with him that the air campaign had
reduced the fighting power of some
Iraqi divisions by as much as 40 per-
cent.
Iraq said it would welcome a
ground assault by the allies, who
now have about 700,000 soldiers in
the region.
Several hours before Saddam's
speech, Baghdad radio said Iraqi

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By Alan Landau
2 HOURS LATER
SORRY GUYS, WE'RIE
OUT OF' CUPS.
E 1
C' OODIq

MEAL PLAN
Continued from page 1
2 meals per day Monday through
Saturday and one on Sunday. If a
student misses a meal and does
not redeem the $2.50 credit at a
snack bar, the credit is lost.
Along with the meal contract,
students can open an Entree Plus
Account which allows them to des-
ignate a lump sum to be charged
to their tuition bill. This money
can be used in University snack
bars, restaurants in the Union and
North Campus Commons, or to
purchase additional meals in the
cafeteria.
To use the new meal plan op-
tions, students must first buy into
the new Standard Plan and then
choose the modified programs.
The changes to be implemented
include:
Standard Plan - A student
may eat any 13 meals per week
from the 18 presently offered, Sun-
day through Saturday - up to
three meals some days, as few as
zero on some days. This plan re-
places the current Entree program
which only allows students to eat 2
meals per day. With the current
plan, if a student misses a meal,
the credit is lost. The new plan
will allow students to "make-up"
the missed meal on another day.
"There is the notion that the
student is getting ripped off,"
Foulke said. "The student is not
paying for 13 meals. Absenteeism

is averaged in and students are ac-
tually paying for that average -
9.75 meals per week."
Option 9 - A student can
eat any 9 meals from Monday
through Friday and opt not to dine
in the residence hall on the week-
end. The student will receive ap-
proximately 15 percent credit to an
Entree Plus Account to make up
the monetary difference between
the Standard Plan and the Option 9
plan.
"It's great for someone who
goes home frequently on the
weekend or who wants to get a
break from the residence hall,"
Foulke said.
Zero Option - Students opt
to eat no meals and dine on an En-
tree Plus basis only. The student
will pay the fee for the Standard
Plan and receive approximately 55
percent credit to an Entree Plus
Account.
Foulke explained that the other
45 percent of the money goes to
sustain residence hall operations.
"Everyone ought to share in
fixed costs even if the person buys
out. They should share in the cost
of running the residence hall be-
cause those units are provided for
rcerr and board," Foulke said.
The Housing division staff plans
to send a letter in early August to
ask students which plan they want.
Then, until a certain date in
September, students will have the
option to change plans.
"If it doesn't work out, they can

""

In commemoration of Black History Month
the Department of Communication is proud to
present the photo exhibit,
"O, Write My Name:
American Portraits - Harlem Heroes"
50 photogravures from original negatives by Carl Van Vechten
Center Galleries, Rackham Graduate Studies Building
Monday through Friday, 1-5 p.m.
now through February 15, 1991

troops were prepared "to make this
duel the end of the imperialist Amer
ican empire."
"Let them dare to attack," the ra-
dio said.
Soviet television reported that
Yevgeny Primakov, a personal rep-
resentative of Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev, headed to Iraq
yesterday.
One day earlier, Gorbachev said
the Persian Gulf War was threaten
ing to exceed the bounds of U.
resolutions
change again at the beginning of,
the next semester," said Foulke.
In order to reduce the financial
strain the Food Service Program
will most likely incur with these
new options, the Housing Division
is planning to close half of the
dorms' cafeterias on the weekends.
"We don't know what this is
going to do to us financially. If 100
percent of the residents opt for the
'Any-9 Plan,' I think I'm out of
work. We won't be able to cut our
costs quickly enough," Foulke
said.
Bursley, Markley, South Quad,
and East Quad will remain open
for weekend dining. One of the
smaller Hill dorms - probably
Stockwell - will also remain
open.
The administrators are antici-
pating some problems along with
the added flexibility to the meal
program. There is the possibility of
overcrowding and long lines at the
dorms that are open on the week-
ends.
Also, there may not be enough
locker space to accommodate,
bookbags and coats in the winter.,
As a result, coats and backpacks
will be permitted inside dining
rooms on weekends.
In order to gauge student reac-
tion to the reformed plans, forums
will be held at residence halls the
week before spring break on,.
February 18, 19, and 20. Times
and locations will be publicized by
residence hall staff.
approval of the disruption and crit-
icized the disrupters for their
takeover of the regents' public
comments session.
"It is a tragedy that these stu
dents took over public comments
and prevented other students from
meeting the regents. This small
group is depriving the larger body
of holding a dialogue with the
board," he said.
After the meeting, Nielsen said
he mainly is concerned with the
teaching assistants whom he be-
lieves led the disruption. As em-
ployees of the University, Nielsen
said, the TAs should act with more
discretion and respect in their
dealings with the regents.
None of the student disruptors
could be reached for comment.
said the programs were necessary
to bridge the students' learning and
social experience.
Swain suggested community-
outreach programming for studentsO
in Ann Arbor city agencies. Stu
dents would work in organizations
which could supplement their ar-
eas of interest.
Swain would not discuss further
specifics of the proposals, "I am
not prepared to discuss thedetails
of the programs, because there are

a lot of people who help in plan-
ning."
Swain added that program out-
lines should be complete by the
end of the semester.

I(EY
WEST./
For Reservations,
call 1-800-255-3050
or 1-305-294-3773

I

DISRUPTION
Continued from page 1
removed from the meeting, Regent
Neal Nielsen (R-Brighton) mo-
tioned to have the students who
disrupt such meetings expelled
from the University.
"It's time to consider suspend-
ing these students for this kind of
behavior. They should have their
student privileges revoked,"
Nielsen proposed.
No regents seconded the motion
but others concurred that the out-
burst was unnecessary.
"I know regents have tele-
phones and are always available to
meet with students," Regent Paul
Brown (D-Petoskey) said.
Duderstadt also voiced his dis-
HOUSING
Continued from page 1
would benefit.
"It is discriminatory that this
group of students should be as-
sessed the one-half percent in-
crease... because (the programs)
are open to everyone whether they
live in University housing or
apartments," she said.
Other regents agreed with
Smith's position. "I object to levy-
ing a fee to all students in housing.
It ought to be funded from another
source," Baker said.
Interim Vice President for Stu-
dent Services Mary Ann Swain

Send ear.y

Stay ate.

SbE £tdl4Jan BUiIQ
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