100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 08, 1991 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-08
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

*1

0

F .. .
t

. 4

0 ~ ~

0

't a

U.
I:

B4 -0 9 7 r

Be eu
Burger joints let you have it your way

Only in Ann Arbor are there
more places to get a chipati or
falafel than a juicy, good ol'
fashioned burger. Not a tofu
burger. Or a veggie burger. We're
talking 100 percent grade-A
American beef.
Unfortunately, burger lovers,
have recently been treading rough.
waters as their beloved beef has
been victimized by the current
political winds. Few desire to risk
this hypothetical encounter with
a PC patroller: You Cattleist! How
dare you oppress the livestock of the
world! Indeed, only the most
courageous of souls will venture
to grab a burger on campus when
the more politically-neutral,
vegetable-based chipati is
available.
And who can justify ordering
a burger when a grilled fish
sandwich is much lighter on the
heart?
Of course, for those who
occasionally crave a convenient
burger, options do exist (read:
Burger King and McDonald's). In
addition, there is always the
classic MUGburger. But
considering the first thing
incoming students are told is
never - NEVER - eat a
MUGburger (it represents an
alternate life form that is neither
animal nor vegetable), we can see
why many shy away from Ann
Arbor beef.
Of course, one can enter nearly
any traditional American
restaurant and order a hamburger.
If you're lucky, they'll throw a
pickle on it.

The problem with these places
is they do not specialize in burgers.
They don't serve them in
varieties.
If you have access to an
automobile, you can travel off-
campus and find an excellent
ground round at Bill Knapp's. But
considering most don't have the
time or the means for a Knapp at
lunchtime - and some are
bothered by having to dine with a
crowd exclusively made up of
near-septagenarians - we'll stick
to closer places.
On campus, only two real
burger joints exist. Only two
places that live, breathe and
exude beef. Two places called
Blimpy's and L.A. Club Caf6.
Blimpy's
If you don't eat fried food, stop
reading now.
But if you remember that you
are a student and probably have
fifty years of your life left to
worry about your blood pressure
and cholesterol, Blimpy's --
formally known as Krazy Jim's
Blimpyburgers - is the place we
recommend as the campus's
can't-miss consummate burger
joint.
Along with Shakey Jake,
Corey Dolgon, and that guy at
CRISP who yells out your name
when your printout is ready,
Blimpy's is an Ann Arbor
institution.
Blimpy's, on Madison and
Packard, starts with its deep
fryer and ends with its grill.
Basically, a customer walks in,

.:{{.:{t; iytz" ' .. tt}';:'';}}.$:}t". ; "::: Y: tt:::: t}'
.. M.SW.W.Vft}; ?.p} t :"{ ; 'v:"r}::" '.t; .{{. ":::::.,.4"":i:t:::y :

I: :::: ::"

N O A H " F I N K EL
E R I C * L E M O N T
OUT TO.
LUNCH*
FOOD.CONNOISSEURS
A T" L A R G E

Be back in
15 minutes

I

. steps into a cafeteria-style line
and is asked, "Anything from the
fryer?" More often than not, the
customer reflexively answers
"Fries."
Surprisingly, the fries are
subpar. They are too large, soft,
and undercooked. As a culinary
colleague succinctly said: "You'd
think a place like that would
have better fries."
Some, however, in a vain
attempt to extract something
healthy from the meal, opt for
fried zucchini or cauliflower.
These are the same dieting
creatures that frequent Stucchi's
Are You 3 Months
From Graduating
and Still Do Not
Have A Job?
*If you are in a field that is
in high demand you may
still qualify to finance a
new car or truck through
Ann Arbor Toyota or
Mazda.
'Come see us. We may
have a surprise for you.
Call Lowell for details.
Ann Arbor Toyota Mazda
2867 Washtenaw
1 Mile East of 23
Across from Kmart
434-9600

and order a 98 oz. trough of frozen
yogurt (fat-free of course) and a 64
oz. vat of Diet Coke.
From the fryer, the customer
steps forth to the grill - the
epicenter of the restaurant. It is
here that one can order a single,
double, triple, quad or even a quint
hamburger on five different kinds
of rolls. One can get just about
anything on a burger, from
pickles, lettuce, onions, and
tomatos to black olives, hot
peppers, bacon, mushrooms, fried
egg, and three types of mustard.
Be careful, though, in how
you place your order. Here is a
typical dialogue between an
employee and a neophyte
Blimpyite:
Employee: What do you want?
You: Uh...
Employee: You want that on a
kaiser? Come on, I don't have all
day.
You: I'll have a hamburger.
Employee: No shit. What size?
You: (In a vain attempt to look
like you know what you're doing)
Oh yeah, I'll have a double on
kaiser with lettuce, tomato...
Employee: I don't care what
condiments you want on it. Save
it for later. Do you want any

cheese or anything fried on it?
You: Yeah, I'll have some
cheese.
Employee: What kind? Swiss,
Bleu, Provolone, American...?
You: American..
Employee: That's boring. You
can get that at McDonald's.
The employee has a point. You
can't get Blimpy's loose-style
hamburgers anywhere and,
especially not its unparalled
choice of condiments and
toppings.
And you certainly can't
match Blimpy's low prices - a
quint with cheese is only $3.20,
and fries are a mere 75 cents.
The employees' humor is only
one of many of Blimpy's many
eccentricities. It doesn't advertise,
it doesn't serve soda, and it isn't
open on Sundays.
Maybe that's why we like it so
much.
L.A. Club Cafe
When people think of L.A.
fare, they think of California
nouvelle cuisine. They think of a
meal consisting of mesquite-
grilled swordfish, two julienned
carrots, and one boiled redskin
potato.
Enter L.A. Club Cafe, which,
while serving the perfunctory
southern California frozen
yogurt, also offers something
more:
Char-broiled burgers.
We are big, big fans of L.A.
Club Caf6, which replaced TCBY
on State Street last summer.
Burger King notwithstanding, we
know of no other place which
serves such good and large (one-
third of a pound) charbroiled
burgers at such low prices.
Palate pleasers include the
Double Play, two one-third lb.
patties with cheese for $3.75, and
a Casanova's Italian with pizza
sauce and mozzarella for $2.95.
The Cafe also serves an
excellent charbroiled chicken
sandwich for $3.25 and a Chicken
Kabob (marinated, all-white
charbroiled meat with tomatoes,
onions, and green peppers on a
Greek pita) for $3.95.
Any of these entr6es can be
ordered with a large and tasty
order of curly fries, chili and
cheese fries, or onion rings.
Our only gripes with the Caf6
is too little seating, too many
mirrors, and too much MTV in
the background.

In the long run, as these
sentiments increase, stronger
expressions of discontent could
follow. An extreme action could
include possible coups of Islamic
governments in the coalition.
Still another issue links the
war and the approach of
Ramadan: many believe the
coming of the Muslim holy
month will increase pressure on
the coalition to begin a ground
war. They expect that the United
States would appear more
sensitive to Muslims if land
fighting begins soon and not
closer to Ramadan.
While few would call March
17 a second deadline - one by
which to begin ground war - the
Department of Defense has said it
is aware of Ramadan's meaning
to the Muslim world.
If ground war is heavily
underway by Ramadan, there is
possibly less chance of loss of
Islamic and Arab support. Each
nation's government will have to
decide for itself- but the sense of
Muslim brotherhood brought out
by the month may factor into
their decisions, especially in
Syria, whose commitment to the
coalition is believed to be
relatively weak.
Nader Adamali, a Muslim
Business School junior, does not
believe the war will last long
enough to reach Ramadan. "Most
of Iraq has been destroyed," he
said. Citing the eight Ramadans
that passed during the long war
between Iran and Iraq, Adamali
also said he does not believe
Ramadan would have much
effect on the war if it were still
being waged.
"I think the coalition will
start ground war when it's
necessary," Adamali said,
brushing aside the idea that
Ramadan could pressure a

The recent protest in Morocco
which drew 300,000 people is
further proof of growing disdain
for the war and especially Arab
participation in the coalition.
Arabs are afraid that the
United States' may have plans for
"a new world order," as President

Muslim Student Association.
Zahurullah believes Ramadan
will not have a great effect on the
war but talked about the
increasing grass-roots support for
Iraq in Arab nations as well as the
increasing animosity toward the
coalition.

outside countries involved in
Arab affairs," he said.
More significant than
Ramadan in impacting the war,
Zahurullah said, is the Hajj, a
time in June in which hundreds of
thousands of Muslims undertake
pilgrimages to Mecca in Saudi
Arabia. Also, the harsher summer
weather which will begin in the
next month should make a
ground war difficult. The Hajj
will create security problems and
may inspire protest riots against
the gulf war, in which Muslims
are killing Muslims.

The Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is the holiest site for all Muslims. Every year, thousands of pilgrims arri

'Most Islamic people would deplore the bombing of Muslim Iraqi people,
especially if they were fasting. I hope that they will call a cease-fire long
before Ramadan because the lives of humans are sacred. All people are
brothers and sisters'
- Rev. Imamuhammad Karoub,
Federation of Islamic Organizations in the United States and Canada

premature land war initiative by
the Allies.
However, the longer the
coalition waits, the more
opportunity there is for anti-
American sentiment to build up.
In Jordan, demonstrations which
were first seen as inconsequential
have become indicators of strong
hostility toward Americans.
Recent small explosions in
Amman are suspected of having
been targeted for U.S. citizens.
In response, the U.S. State
Department has warned all
Americans to leave the region.
King Hussein of Jordan has also
told his people that they must
continue .to respect the guests of
their nation.

Bush puts it, in the region, said
Fazlur Zahurullah, an LSA
senior and member of the Muslim
Student Association on campus.
Zahurullah said his views do not
necessarily represent those of the

"The Arabs want their own
self-determination. They're afraid
of a permanent U.S. presence,
especially military, in the Arab
world. They just don't want

I

L.

994-3572
500 E. LIBERTY ( at Thompson)
M-W 9:30-6:30, Tb1& F 9:30-8, Sat 9-6, Sun 12-6
U

Need the hot news fast?
Find it in the Daily.

February 8, 1991

WEEKEND

Page 12

.Page 5

WEEKEND

Fe

.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan