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February 08, 1991 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ice hockey
vs. Western Michigan
Tonight, 7:30 p.m.
Yost Arena
The Michigan Daily
*Cagers
to fight
Badgers,
"Wildcats
by Rod Loewenthal
Daily Basketball Writer
Trudging into the second half of
the conference season, the Michigan
women's basketball team hopes its
fbrtunes improve this weekend when
the Wolverines travel to Big Ten
Iles Wisconsin and Northwestern.
Friday night's game against the
Badgers (9-10 overall, 3-6 Big Ten)
looks to be a title fight rematch be-
tween Wisconsin guard Robin
Threatt and the Wolverines (9-10, 2-
7). When the teams met in Ann Ar-
bor last month, Threatt was disquali-
fied in the fourth quarter after she
wrestled Michigan forward Nikki
Beaudry to the court.
"You can't help but play physical
against them," Michigan coach Bud
VanDeWege said.
Threatt leads the Badgers in scor-
ing, averaging over 16 points per
game in conference play. Michele
Kozelka, the Badger's 6-foot-1 for-
ward, continues to lead the confer-
ence in rebounds, averaging 9.6.
On Sunday, the Wolverines travel
Evanston, Ill., where they take on
Northwestern (12-5, 5-3). This Wild-
cat team, however, won't be the
same team that Michigan faced last
month in Crisler Arena.
"Northwestern has had two sig-
nificant injuries," VanDeWege said.
"What you're going to see is a lot
different personnel out there."
Northwestern coach Don Perrelli
was dealt a blow last weekend when
* senior forward Wilha Lee went down
with a twisted right knee early in the
Wildcats game against Ohio State.
Senior guard Jeanine Wasielewski
will also be on the pine with a rup-
tured patellar tendon in her left knee.
Char Durand has been a leader on
the court for the Wolverines the past
four games and will probably be a
major factor in this weekend's con-
.t1sts. VanDeWege said the team real-
izes that Durand is on a roll and is
looking to feed her the ball more of-
ten.
The key to the rest of the season,
however, will be Michigan's ability
to play forty minutes of solid bas-
ketball.
"We need to begin to throw two
halves together," VanDeWege said.
* "We can't keep having these Jeckyll
and Hyde games."

SPORTS
Friday, February 8, 1991

Men's Basketball
vs. Iowa
Tomorrow, 8 p.m.
Crisler Arena
Page 9

Icers take on Broncos

by Jeni Durst
Daily Hockey Writer
The marathon is in the 25th
mile and the runners are vying for
final positions. The trailers are
rushing fast and gaining ground.
Yet, if the frontrunner uses its
speed and refrains from looking too
far past the finish line, ignoring the
threat behind it, its lead should be
retained.
The leader in this race is the
Michigan hockey team (21-4-3
Central Collegiate Hockey Asso-
ciation, 24-5-3 overall), currently
on a twelve game winning streak,
and it is Western Michigan (14-10-
2, 17-12-3) nipping at the Wolver-
ines' heels.
The Broncos have lately been
piling up the victories, capturing
nine of their past 11 games and
scoring a phenomenal 33 goals in
their last five outings. A victory or
a tie against the second-place
Wolverines this weekend will cat-
apult them into position to upend
Ferris State for hold of third place
in the league.
"They're a good team and
might be the best team we've
played since the GLI (Great Lakes
Invitational), when we played

Maine," Michigan coach Red
Berenson said. "I think it's a series
that if we play really well then
maybe we can slow them down,
but it'll be a challenge for us to
play really well."
The main challenge will come
in the form of Western's top line,
Keith Jones, Mike Eastwood, and
captain Tom Auge. These three are
the boosters who could blast the
Broncos past Michigan. They ac-
counted for all of Western's goals
in the series back in December.
Michigan needs not only to
thwart the speed of the motivated
Broncos Friday at Yost and Satur-
day in Kalamazoo, but to capital-
ize on its own speed. As in the
previous series between the two
teams, Western will try to control
the Wolverines' quickness through
plenty of physical checking, fore-
checking, and, inevitably, many
penalties. Michigan will need to
stay focused to avoid falling into
the Broncos' style of play.
"For the most part we get
drawn into physical games be-
cause other teams are trying to run
our team and distract us from our
game," Berenson added. "But we
go into games with the idea of out-

skating the other team if we can
and that will be our intention this
weekend."
Outskating and outscoring other
teams has been the Wolverines'
forte in recent weeks. Against Ohio
State last weekend, the Wolver-
ines boasted offensive bursts from
ten different sources, with at least
one point coming from every line.
"Michigan's strength is defi-
nitely its good mobility, explosive
speed, and excellent skating abil-
ity," Western coach Bill Wilkin-
son said, "not only on offense, but
on defense as well."
Yet recent injuries, namely to
first-year icers David Oliver and
David Wright, have produced, a
cramp in the Wolverines' side.
This weekend will mark the debut
of the complete lineup that will
most probably carry Michigan into
the CCHA playoffs. Leftwing Dan
Stiver and senior Kent Brothers
will plug the holes left by the side-
lined rookies and allow the
Wolverines to keep running.
"(The lineup changes) are go-
ing to affect us a little bit, but not
really," defenseman Chris Tamer
said.

JOS. JUA
Brian Wiseman in action from last weekend's series at Ohio State.

Second half begins with Iowa

-

__

by Andrew Gottesman
Daily Basketball Writer
The last Iowa-Michigan men's
basketball matchup was a lot like
cooking a hamburger: very sloppy
and lots of turnovers.
Iowa's press, combined with the
two team's extreme youth, brought
about 54 turnovers - 32 in the
first half. Michigan managed to
jump out to a 12-0 lead and stay
with Iowa for most of the game,
but, eventually, the Hawkeyes
proved too well-versed in the run-
and-gun offense and wore down the
Wolverines for a 79-78 victory.
Tomorrow's game at Crisler (8
p.m., Raycom), thesbeginning of
the Big Ten's second half,
promises more of the same. With
Iowa (4-5 Big Ten, 15-6 overall)
still pressing and both squads still
young, look for a fast-paced
matchup full of scoring but lacking
finesse.
"We have to do a better job of
handling their full-court pressure,"
said Michigan coach Steve Fisher.
"You have to not let one turnover
lead to three and we didn't.
"It's a very important game for
us. If we hope to reverse our record
in the second half, we have to in

home games."
Michigan's job will be even
tougher this time around, as Iowa
brings a two-game winning streak
and Big Ten player-of-the-week
Acie Earl into Ann Arbor. Earl, a
sophomore center, is averaging
16.8 points and 6.4 rebounds per
game. He also leads the Big Ten
in blocked shots.
"Even though he's a
sophomore, he's been an impact
player," said Iowa coach Tom
Davis. "He has very good move-

ments on the defensive end. He
kind of characterizes the ballclub
as a whole: we're scrambling from
week to week."
But Michigan (3-6, 10-9) will
not be pounded flat easily. The
Wolverines are entering the game
on a high note after pulling off an
upset victory at Minnesota last
week. In addition, Iowa has not
won in Crisler since 1981. And
Michigan should get its share of
blocked shots, as Eric Riley is
second in the conference behind
Earl.

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