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February 01, 1991 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-01

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The Michigan Daily -Friday, February 1, 1991 - Page 3

WING
Continued from page 1
these issues than white men, even
though both groups reported nearly
identical amounts of coverage of
these issues.
"It was interesting that women
and minority students were less
satisfied (than white men)," said
WING task force co-chair Peg
Lourie. "White men are more
likely to respond positively to the
coverage of white men in that
course."
Stewart concurred. "It's men -
,,,,and specifically white men -- who
fperceive the coverage is ade-
quate," she said.
In light of the difference, WING
xx -wants departments to survey intro-
, 'ductory courses and ensure each
a. "explicitly mentions the race, gen-
,der, ethnicity, and sexual orienta-
,tion biases imbedded in their dis-
w, ciplines. WING desires, an in-
creased faculty awareness of the
survey results.
"Faculty need to be more con-
Calvin and Hobbe
IT1R-. CwIT TO B: N OF CR e

cerned than we often are that stu-
dents are not alike," Stewart said.
"What feels adequate to one stu-
dent is totally inadequate for an-
other. We can't be just responsive
to one group."
"The important thing is for the
faculty to be aware that this is a
very pervasive pattern. There is
generally not sufficient coverage.
People should be taking seriously
that there is this general pattern,"
Stewart added.
WING members are especially
concernet with the issue of sexual
orientation. "More and more peo-
ple are including sexual orienta-
tion, but it's obviously lagging be-
hind," Lourie said.
First-year student Sarah Miller,
said sexual orientation and ethnic-
ity were discussed in an anthropol-
ogy course used in the survey,
which she took.
"It definitely deals with ethnic-
ity," Miller said. "It didn't deal
with gender as much as I would
have liked. I was disappointed that
the professor didn't attempt to fill

in those gaps.
Anthropology Prof. Conrad Kot-
tak asserted anthropology is a field
which encompasses diverse topics.
Kottak tackles issues of race, eth-
nicity, gender, class, discrimina-
tion, and sociolinguistic discrimi-
nation, or prejudice based on how
people talk, with a textbook titled
Anthropology: The Exploration of
Human Diversity.
"Anthropology has always been
a course about cultural diversity.
Long before colleges began to be-
come interested in diversity, an-
thropology was interested," Kottak
said.
Miller said other academic dis-
ciplines must be more sensitive to
feminist issues. She said an Art
History course neglected issues
which needed to be discussed.
"This professor spent two days
showing us classic rape scenes
from Western art without ever ad-
dressing the political and social
implications like this (rape) is part
of our culture," she said.
"It's not that I feel he has a

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by Bill Watterson
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compulsion to be political in
class... It was insensitive and irra-
tional to spend that much time on
rape and not discuss why our cul-
ture is a rape culture."
Other students feel certain
classes, including Great Books, do
not lend themselves to issues con-
cerning diversity.
Second-year LSA student Alex
Ginsburg, who is against the idea
of a Great Books course, argued it
is not feasible to deftly include
such issues in that course.
"Let's face facts: Greek white
men wrote the syllabus. Either you
have to redefine Great Books,
which is the right idea, or face up
to the reality that these are
marginal issues in the defined
Great Books. I think the Great
Books program has lost touch with
reality," he said.
Great Books Prof. Don Cameron
disagreed, arguing unless a narrow
definition is used, diversity in-
cludes the study of Greek culture.
Cameron also asserted the is-
sues presented in the survey were
touched upon by books read in the
course.
The content value of discussion
was disputed, however. "It was a
sham. We had a token discussion
of race. It just seemed to be in-
jected. It was highly artificial and
most of the students seemed to
take it that way," Ginsburg said.
WING does not expect an im-
minent student backlash to diver-
sity, since less than five percent
of responding students felt these
issues were being given too much
coverage.
DEFICIT,
Continued from page 1
Senate, and Executive Office at-
tempting to reconcile the Democratic
and Republican plans began yester-
day. University officials said last
week they were hopeful that the
governor would continue to stand by
his promise not to reduce higher ed-
ucation funding.
Keith Molin, assistant to Vice-
president for Government Relations
Richard Kennedy, said higher educa-
tion has been continually under-
funded for the past 10 years.
"Effectively, education has had its
growth curtailed over a long period
of time." Last year, for the first time
in the University's history, student
tuition and fees composed a larger
share of the budget than state appro-
priations, Molin said.

Nuts and Bolts

HEARD YOO'URE HAING
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"MU"!CAN SENdSE-m E OCcF~tVe

WHEN4 WAS THE tLASr1TME'
You HAD A DAM FYL'HPY.

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by Judd Winick
( '66 Bur ASK QiICXS k:
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Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports'
Big Three will idle car plants
DETROIT (AP) - The nation's Big Three automakers plan to shut
down 24 car and truck assembly plants next week, temporarily idling
more than 62,000 workers because of a shortage of dealer orders, the
companies said yesterday.
General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. have
been trying for more than a year to balance production with slipping
demand. Closing assembly plants frequently means shutting down
some of the thousands of supplier and component plants.
Employees covered by United Auto Workers union contracts with
the companies receive benefits designed to get them 95 percent of
their regular pay when their plants are closed because of sales slumps.
GM officials said the company would stop production at 11 of its
U.S. and Canadian factories, and production at two plants will be cut
in half. In all, about 39,000 employees will be idled.
Levin urges new trade laws
WASHINGTON (AP)- Sen. Carl Levin has renewed his push for
tougher trade legislation, saying the Bush administration's more con-
ciliatory approach has failed to open Japanese markets.
"We ought to stand up and defendaour jobs here with the same de-
termination that we defend liberty around the world," the Detoit
Democrat said. "Michigan and every other state is losing jobs to com-
tries who defend their workers' jobs."
The bill, which Levin said had bipartisan backing, is similar to one
he introduced without success last year following the administration's
decision to remove Japan from the list of nations with the most unfair
barriers to U.S. exports.
Countries on the list are subject to retaliatory limits on their acc ss
to U.S. markets.
Smoking death rate rises
ATLANTA (AP) - More Americans are quitting smoking, and more
are dying, now more than 400,000 a year, as the habits of the 1950's and
60's take an increasing toll, federal health officials said yesterday.
The national Centers for Disease Control reported the 434.175
Americans died from smoking in 1988, up 11 percent from the
390,000 deaths attributed to smoking in a 1985 study.
Those numbers reglect a steady, deadly trend, CDC researchers said.
Back in 1965, the calculated toll from smoking deaths was 188,000.
"The problem is, we are now paying for what happened 20 to 30
years ago, when large numbers of people smoked in large amounts," said
Dr. William Roper, director of the Atlanta based CDC.
Soybeans, death syndrome
are linked say researchers
CHAMPAIGN, Illinois (AP) - Some varieties of soybeans bred to
fight rot are more vulnerable to a mysterious and lethal disease- Sudden
Death Syndrome (SDS), researchers say.
However, little is understood about the link between the gene for resis-
tance to phytophthora root rot and susceptibility to SDS, said Paul Gib-
son, a plant and soil scientist at Southern Illinois University.
"We came upon it entirely by accident, but the link just stood out,
said Gibson, one of a group of scientists in the South and Midwest study-
ing the disease and the soybean's response to it.
"It is a very elusive disease; it comes and goes and it is not always
where you expect it to be," said Keith Smith, director of research for the
American Soybean Association in St, Louis. "Any piece of the puzzle
like this will help us come up with the final solution."
EXTRA'
Best of luck to the Daily's
new editors. You'll need it!
Today, to most of you, is just another cold February day, with
classes, work, and, if you're lucky, a night at the bar. But for this
year's Daily editors it is the end of an era, and the great step into the
unknown. For incoming Daily editors, today begins a journey into
Daily responsibility and a step into the murky world of college
journalism.
We wish you, the incomiing editors, the patience to deal with new
reporters who can't write a complete sentence and with old reporters,
who know how, but sometimes don't feel like doing so. We wish you
the friendships that we have found and the strength to deal with each
other in times of great stress. We wish you dozens of happy Thursday
nights at Ashley's and a hundred coronary-free meals from Mabel
and Pete at Frank's. We hope you learn from your mistakes and

never stop laughing at yourselves when you make them.
And, perhaps most of all, we hope you take advantage of this year'
and appreciate it before it's gone. It will be over before you know it
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28.00 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March
1, 1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the College Press Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550
EDITORAL STAFF:

Write with us
Cal].764-0552

Order your college ring NOW
JO STENS
A M E R I C A S C O L L E G E R I N G
Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Feb. 1
11 am.to4 p.m.
to select from a complete line of gold rings,
A $20.00 deposit is required.

VALENTINE'S DRY
IS COMING SO!
Can't figure out what to get your sweetie for this special
day? 94t icIdIaU aitg has the solution! On Feb. 14,
we will publish a special Valentine's Day page filled with
red hearts, & you can buy one of these hearts to put
your own personal valentine message in for
only $5.00!
Please note - 94lt WUtdsgan r1ti can only accept
payment in cash, Ann Arbor area personal checks,
money orders or cashier's checks.
MONDEYW FEB. 11
11:30 H.M.
Please see the Classifted Page for order
form, or call 764-0557.

book & supply

317 South State
(at North University)
Ann Arbor, MI
665-4990

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Valid only, at:
U/M Central Campus
546 Packard/Hill
665-6005

COTTAGE INN PIZZA CERTIFICATE
MEDIUM DEEP DISH PIZZA
(With 1 Topping)

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MEDIUM
DEEP

Editor In Chef Noah" SexMachine' Finkel Sports Editor Mike 'Band Lover' Gil
Managing Editor Kristine'The Bean' LaLonde Associate Editors Andy "King Fascist Gottesman
News Editors Diane 'DMC' Cook, Ian'Yan'Hoifman David Hyman, Eric 'Fudge' Lem
Josh 'Yoshi' Mitnick, Noelle'My Beile" vance Ryan Schreiber, Jeff 'She-rock' n
Opinion Editor David 'Rusty' Schwartz Arts Editors Mark'Shy Boy' Binei,*Netty' er
Associate Editors Mike Fischer, Stephen'Jackass' Books Carolyn Pajor
Henderson, 1. Matthew MiNer, Film Brent Edwards
Dan"The Man' Poux Music Pete Shapiro
Weekend Editor Gil'Slash' Renberg Fne Arts Elizabeth Lenhard
Associate Editor Josey 'Nosy' Balenger Theater Mary Beth Barber
Weekend Arts Editor Tony *The Bone' Silber
Photo Editors Jose'J.J.' Juarez, Ken 'Smo' Smller List Editor Gil Renberg
News: Chris Afendulis, Lad Barager, Jon Casden, Micihele Clayton, Lynne Cohn. Brenda Dickinson, Jdie Foster, Jay Garcia,
Henry Goldbatt, Christne'The Other Kristine' Kloostra, Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel, Melssa Peerless, Tami Polak, David
Rhaingld, Bethany Robertson, Lisa Sanchez, Gwen Shaffer, Sarah Schweitzer, Purvi Shah, Lee Shulro, Jesse Snyder, Annabel
vered, Stafarie Vines, Garridk Wang, Donna'The Singing Re-write' Woodwell.
Opinion: Russell Balimore, Geoff Earle, Leslie Helbrum, David Leiner, Andrew M. Levy, Jennifer Mattson, Chris Nordstrom,
Glym Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Jason Bank, Jeff Cameron, Theodore 'Bundy Cox, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Joni
Durst, Jim Foss, Jason Gomberg, Phil'Blood' Green, R.C. Heaton, Ryan Herrington, David Kraft, Rich Levy, Jeff Lieberman,
Albert Lin, Rod Loewenthal, Adam Miller, John'Ames' Niyo, Malt 'Type H' Rennie, David Schechter, Caryn Seidman, Rob
Siegel, Eric Sklar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Charlie Wolfe, Dan'Dantana' Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Jan Bilik, llene Bush, Andy Cahn, Belh Cdk#ilt, Jenie Dahlman, Richard S. Davis, Michael Paul Fischer,
Gregg Raxman, Forrest Green ill, Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kolody, Jule Komorn, Mike Kuniavsky, David 'Lubs Lubiner, Mike
Molitor, Kristin 'Bloncie Palm, Jon Rosenthal, Sue Uselmann, Mike Wison, Kim Yaged.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Antiony M. Crof, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Michele Guy, Rob Kroenert, Suzie Paley.
Weekend: Jonathan Chait, Scott Chupack, Larry Hu, Erica Kohnke, Craig Lim, Jesse Walker, Fred Zinn.

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