100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wrind 1AV in

MAGAZINE
Vol V, No. 7 Sunday, April 19, 1959
SPRING WEEKEND AGAIN
....Page Two
CRITICAL LOOK AT LIFE
By Donald Yates Page Two
MOST CONSERVATIVE OF CONSERVATIVES
By David Tarr Page Three
OPERATION BOOTSTRAP
By Thomas Turner Page Five
WORST ALONENESS OF ALL
By David Lowe Page Eight
ACADEMIC APPREHENSION
By Guy E. Swanson Page Nine
A TREASURY OF ART
_ Page Twelve
A PERSONAL TOUCH TO FOREIGN AID
By Charles Kozoll Page Fourteen
MAGAZINE EDITOR - David Tarr
PHOTOS: Cover: University News Service; Page 2: top, bottom right-
University News Service, bottom left-Daily-.John Hirtzel; Page
5: Puerto Rico Economic Development Administration; Page 6:
United Nations; Page 8: bottom right-State of New York, others
--Daily--Allan Winder; Page 9; University News Service; Page
11: University News Service; Page 12 and 13: Fred Anderegg;
Page 15: Daily-Allan Winder.
FOR THE NOVELIST:
Critical Look at Life
TWO NOVELS of recent date The inhibiting influence of this
make possible an observation facto- is indeed slight - which,
concerning the problems of the the reader will conclude, is all for
young writer engaged in his pro- the best. For Sally Jay is, quite
fession. delightfully, a law unto herself.
"The Dud Avocado" by Elaine
Dundy (Dutton, N.Y. 1958, 255 THE STORY opens at a good
pp., $3.50) is a first novel by and; moment: the period of adjust-
about an American female who ment and acquaintance is past;
spent some time in Paris "getting she has been around for a while
educated." and has accepted Paris student
A kindly and not over-protec- life for what it is.
tive uncle has subscribed to the With this background, she meets
expenses of Sally Jane's educa- once again a young American art-
tion abroad, and throughout her ist whom she had known briefly
adventures it is only to him that during her first days in Paris. To
Sally Jay feels the least bit ac- the accompaniment of extravagant
countable for her behavior. physical responses, she falls in
love. This is the initiation of Sally
Jay's "vie amoureuse."
She is an irrepressible, liberal-
minded, uncommonly consistent,
and completely believable young
American girl. Her Paris esca-
pades, which lead up to her mar-
riage and settling down back in
the United States, could have
seemed immoral committed in the
person of anyone but Sally Jay.
In short, the novel is written in
terms of truth and understanding
ES that can only come from enlight-
ened observation of life itself.

t 4 ; ALI
z It , S '
so small a price
you ve ever worn all
1. permanent collar si
reinforced buttons, 0
. ' y~x seersucker, cotto
q , r cotton check
r%
S 1
5 ~
\. N 1

i4

OUR
L-PURPOSE
SHIRT ROB

streetwear,
lounging,
marketing,
all-day wear
5.98
for the busiest, most versatile shirtwaist
day long! and so well constructed, too:
tays, action back, shirtband closing with
hree-way self belt! woven stripe cotton
n baby cord, silk-viscose solid or arnel-
k. pink, blue, maize, shrimp, turquoise,
champagne. small, medium, large.

ANOTHER matter is "A Legacy
of Love" by Edwin Daly (Scrib-
ners, N.Y., 1958, 310 pp., $3.95).
The promise of his first novel,
published in 1957 when he was 22,
has not been realized in the
second. The story deals with Susie
Churchill and Buddy Masters, two
college students who have been
dating, and Phil Doyle, another
college boy with whom Susie falls
in love.
A secondary romantic situation
is developed between Susie's fa-
ther, a high-school teacher, and
Buddy's mother, wife of the rich-
est man in the small Michigan
lakeside town.
The relationships of the younger
threesome are never well-estab-
lished. Susie and Buddy seem
vaguely believable,dbut Phil Doyle,
who dies, fails to gain the stature
of characterization required by the
principal role he occupies. The af-
fair involving the grown-ups, al-
though treated frankly and in
adult terms, is seen as a fuzzy
movement of shadows backstage
to the young people's drama.
The conviction of reality, which
a youthful writer of realism needs
so desperately in his early work,
is seriously lacking. The sense of
1 authentic experience was found in
the author's first work, on which
he labored for over five years.
Daly appears not to have lived
enough to have done, within a
relatively short time, a second
novel.
Through the varying degrees of
success of the two books reviewed
here, one may perceive the vital
need, on the part of the novelist,
of critically observed life experi-
ence as a basis for his fiction.
--Donald A. Yates

Lingerie

Page TwoTHE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan