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September 15, 1958 - Image 9

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U..Cultural Display
Fails in Two RespectsJ%.
(Continued from Page s) Their responses are not grati-
fying. One woman walked through'
children do not believe that the entire art exhibit without
Americans can have the toys they theniie aitpehibit without (
changing ,expresaion, glainced at
see in the toy window, and turn the entiance to the eiican
up their noses. One has an al- theatre on the way out, and
most irrepressible desire to in-
sist to them it's all true, every bit pomtl' tudgged her husband
of i. Th hom (paticuarlyover to admire the red plush car-
of it. The home (particularly pet on the floor there.
kitchen) furnishings attract wo-
men in droves.,
LITERATURE, however, is in a
CULTURALLY, however, the worse way, for the only books
United States has failed bad- in the pavilion are a random se-
ly in two important departments: lection of paperbacks on sale (at
art and literature. The art exhi- double the American price) in a
bit is extensive, but weak. It is Typical American Drug Stoic
divided into two sections, one on None of the quality" papeibacks
colonial painting, the other on are represented. Hardcover pub-
coistemporary painting and sculp- lshers have absolutely no space;
ture. The colonial paintings re- only Encyclopedia Americana has
semble nothing so much as some an exhibit-and it is in the Inter-
of the Dutch portraits of the 16th national Shopping Center, at the
century and the period before other end of the Fair.
" Rembrandt. It is simple and se- In the dramatic arts, however,
vere, and draws sympathetic the Americans run roughshod over
smiles from many of the vigitors; their competition. Although "Car-
most, however, run through it ousel" did surprisingly poorly, PAINTING-This general view of the contemporary American
quickly. Benny Goodman sold out for a paintings exhibit shows a few of the oil paintings and photographs
The modern work, on the other week straight, and the orchestral from America on display.
hand, gets plenty of attention, concerts are well attended.
but mostly of the puzzled variety. In addition, college jazz bands called "Circarama," in which a travelogue on America (in Eng-
Half a dozen people are al- are brought over each week to en- movie screen runs entirely around lish, French, and Flemish, fortu-
most always gathered around a tertain on the island in the middle the audience from eye level to nately). The process was perfect-
piece of sculpture entitled "Sum- of the American lagoon; they the roof (about six feet farther ed by Walt Disney.
mer Evening," which suggests draw tremendous crowds and ap- up) draws full houses all day long; The ubiquitous Harlem Globe-
nothing so much as a woman sun- plause each afternoon. people wait a precious half hour trotters also stop in occasionally
bathing. Further, a remarkable process in line to get in for this 20-minute at the Fair, and receive roaring

welcomes. Despite the Russian
Moiseyev and Bolshoi groups (and
a remarkably unpatronized movie
process called Kinephotorama),
all honors here go to the Ameri-
cans - and are likely to continue
doing so as long as jazz, Walt Dis-
ney, and the Globetrotters are
around.
A COLOR television studio
broadcasting color programs
must be rated the second attrac-
tion behind Circarama in the
American pavilion. Americans as
well as Europeans line up for this
one.
But there are other highspots: a
mechanical hand for handling
r a d i o a c t i v e materials always
draws about 200 people when it
is demonstrated, and a display
of voting machines creates a fu-
ror. Here the European voters get
a chance to try these machines
out by indicating certain Ameri-
can favorites in various cate-
gories. For example: Kim Novak
leads the list of actresses, Louis
Armstrong, musicians, and Albert
Einstein, immigrants.
Among American schools, Har-
vard ranks first; sad to say, the
University stands ninth of 10 pos-
sible choices, ahead only of Mid-
dlebury. In addition, a small ma-
jority of voters regard English and
American as separate languages.
THE RUSSIANS, by contrast,
have few standout attractions,
but they have presented some-
thing of everything, with a more
or less general theme of "From
Wooden Plows to Sputniks."
Heavy machinery is present in
(Conluded on Page I1)

.......... 1 - 1.17

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THE: 'S HOP
1210 South University
OPEN EVENINGS

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Guido Cantelli conducting the Philharonia Orchestra S35620

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THE DISC SNW.
1210 South University
OPEN EVENINGS

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...................... .. . . .

'N A , EPE BR..........
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

Page Nine

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