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January 15, 1958 - Image 2

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN [DAILY MAGAZINE

Wednesday, January 11 5, 1958

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE Wednesday, January 15, 1958

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By PHILIP MUNCK
Daily Staff Writer
IT SEEMS probable that from
the dawn of time, mankind has
looked to the younger generation
to solve the cares of the world.
Today, with international prob-
lems and tensions at an all time
high, the new generation of lead-
ers graduating from America's
colleges and universities faces a
bewildering host of c o m p 1 e x
tangles to unscramble.
How will the college students
of today react when they reach
positions of responsibility in the
near future? If the answer lies
in the beliefs, attitudes and drives
of these students while they- arej
in college, Changing Values in Col-
lege by Prof. Philip E. Jacob of the
University of Pennsylvania pre-
sents a dismal picture of the
future.
THE PICTURE of college stu-
dents as liberal, independent
thinkers using college to choose
and fix their outlooks and atti-
tudes is misleading, if not totally
incorrect, according to Prof. Ja-
cob's study. His book shows that
students are gloriously contented,
and self-centered. They are not
liberalized by the college experi-
ence but are merely socialized,
These are shocking statements,
and will draw quick and bitter
criticism from those students who
believe American colleges to be the
embodiment of liberal and inde-
pendent t h o u g ht. Nevertheless,
this is no immature, half-hearted
study-the material from which
Prof. Jacob has drawn his con-
clusions is impressive both from
the standpoint of the number of
students included and from the
survey's diversity and compre-
hensiveness.
When he released a preliminary
summary of his findings last
spring, critics had a valid point
in citing the lack of statistical
support for his ideas. But the "In-
ventory of the Data" includes 354
different studies and surveys used
in the book-sufficient informa-
tion to support his arguments.
The only grounds left for criticism
of the conclusions is in his inter-
pretation of available facts.

'COLLEGE VALUES
The Jacobs Report Evaluated
CHANGING VALUES IN THE STATISTICAL information
COLLEGE. By Prof. Philip included with the text of his
E. Jacob. New York, 1957: findings is satisfactory and, while
he is too emphatic in his state-
Harper and Brothers. 174 ments at times, the truth of the
pp. $3.50. conclusions is evident. The sad,
Brtunate fet is that t h

uiiuiuulisGt 1t~t 1 u , o v ule
average student, college is an
idealized trade school. It is a place
where one acquires skills necessary
to earn a living and to associate
with his peers.
Prof. Jacob inquires into these
changes in values on both the cur-
ricular and social levels. The only
thing left cut of' the book is an
explanation of the sources of these
attitudes.
ONE POSSIBLE explanation
comes from Reisman's con-
ception of three-staged society.
Reisman divided social develop-
ment into a "tradition directed"
stage, which emphasizes family
and tribal ties; an "inner directed"
stage which is dynamic and in-
dividualistic; and an "other direct-
ed" society in which the emphasis
is on living harmoniously -with
one's fellows. If the United States
is entering such an "other direct-
ed" form of society, one explana-
tion for student conformity can be
explained.
Prof. Jacob's study offers a great
deal of support to this theory. One
of the outstanding conclusions
reached in his book is that college
student's values are remarkably
similar to those of other students
in their own colleges and to all
college students, "regardless of lo-
cation, administration, size and
background of the students body,
or character of the educational
program."
MOST STUDENTS, he finds, are
self-confident. They believe
the individual has control of his
own destiny, that "knowing peo-
ple" is important to success, and
that their lives will be "happy and
long." At the same time, the stu-
dent is quite self-centered and
feels that his first duty in society
is to protect and provide for him-
self and his family.
The average student, Prof. Ja-
cob continues, believes in the here-
after but doesn't let religious
philosophy extend into his per-
sonal life. Although tolerant to-
u aua11y holds to conventional
moral standards.
For the most part, college stu-
dents have no desire to take on
See JACOBS, Page 15

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NATURAL
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MAGAZINE
Vol. IV, No. 4Wednesday, January 15, 1958
CONTENTS
COLLEGE VALUES ..........'Philip Munck Page 2
'THE LIVELIEST ART' ..... Burton Beerman Page 3
HOMAGE TO BREDVOLD Thornton Parsons Page 6
SAILOR'S LIFE .............Thomas Blues Page 6
IN MEMORIAM, R.L.B. ...Ronald Kotulak Page 7
'LOOK BACK IN ANGER' .. Judith Silverman Page 8
MAINE & THE ARTIST . .... Michael Kraft Page 10
PABLO PICASSO ...........R. C. Gregory Page 11
JOSEPH CONRAD .......... R. C. Gregory Page 12
JAZZ HANDBOOK ..........Philip Munck Page 13
MAGAZINE EDITOR: Tammy Morrison
MAGAZINE PHOTOGRAPHER: Bud Bentley
PICTURE CREDITS-Cover: Picasso made "Le Repas Frugal" ("The
Frugal Meal"), a drypoint-and-etching on zinc, in 1904, when
he was 24. Considered one of his best works in this medium, "Le
Repas Frugal" has been widely reproduced. Photograph of the
print in the Alfred Stielglitz Collection was provided- by The Art
Institute of Chicago; Page 3: Photograph Courtesy of the Macmil-
lan Co.; Page 4: Daily photograph by Malcolm Shatz; Page 7:
Daily photograph by Eric Arnold; Page 8: Photograph courtesy
Ronald Muchnick; Page 10: Photographs by Michael Kraft; Page
11: Photographs courtesy Museum of Modern Art; Page 12: Fron-
tispiece from "Joseph Conrad" by Oliver Warner (Longmans,
Green & Co.); Page 13: Jacket from "A Hondbook of Jazz;"
Page 16: Photographs courtesy Museum of Modern Art; Page 18:
Daily photographs by Eric Arnold; Page 19: Daily photograph by
Eric Arnold.

4

Sizes
7 to 12
CAMPUS MAST'S SHOP
619 East Liberty NO 2-0266

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