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August 23, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

In The

Of Sports

FO'UNER

us, but,l
of wit,

(By harry B. Gri(dy)

it times it becomes almost as tire-
as Irving Cobb's drivel. "Mr.
ge Jean Nathan Presents," pub-
d a few months later, is some-
better. The humor has risen a
or two above Leacock and Cobb
r astern. More experienced hands
e drama inform me that the ser-
articles are quite commendable.
"The Popular Theater"
he Popular Theater," coming out
ar later, is better still, but I
not. assign any "outside reading"
we come to "A Book Without a
." I recommend herein the chap-
ntitled "Flippancy," as being es-
ily applicable to the general run
udents.
omedians All,",which came out in
shows quite a spurt ahead. Lea-
is winded now, and Cobb has
bed lout of sight. In this book
ort chapter, "On Aesthetic Dane-
is a fine example of Nathan's
ous wit, and the article on Belasco
und to make the midriff shake.
st year came "Heliogabalus," and
>American Credo," by Mencken
Nathan. The former is the best
e at the expense of Christianity
I have ever read, but as it is in
form I cannot separate Mencken's
from iathan's. "The American
o," for all its humorous twist, is
leadly true for me to treat it as
cr.
Another About the Theater
he Theater, The Drama, and the
;," was published early this year.
ng weekly since the first of Feb-
y I have been able to read about
e chapters, aId I have forgotten
. I can't, however, call it a sad
rsion because the book is about the
ter, concerning which I, know

Grid Season Opens Oct. 1
Coach Yost will have only a brief
space of time in which to whip the
Wolverine football squad into shapel
before the opening game with Mt.
Union college, Oct. 1. Training will
open Sepa. 15, when 44 men are invited
back to early training, while the squad
will be greatly enlarged by Sept. 27,
the time of the opening of the Univer-
sity. This short space of slightly
more than two weeks will mean that
the gridiron warriors will face Mt.
Union without the usual training. Wol-
verine gridders, however, are not oc-
casioning any worry over the prospect,.
as the initial game will merely be one
of the preliminary games, prior to the
opening of the Big Ten season, Oct.
22, with Ohio State.
Other games on the schedule are:
Case, at Ann Arbor, Oct. 8; M. A. C.,
at Ann Arbor, Oct. 15; O. . U., at Ann
Arbor, Oct. 22; Illinois, at Urbana,
Oct. 29; Nov. 5, open date; Wisconsin,
at Madison, Nov. 12; Minnesota, at Ann
Arbor, Nov. 19.
Exams Hit Tiger Stars
Princeton's football prospects have
received a decided set back as the re-
sults of recent examinations which
have played havoc with the Tiger men
of 1920 who defeated Yale, 20 to 0.
Head Coach Bill Roper has instruct-
ed over 50 men to report to Princeton
for early training. Nearly a dozen of
the stars who had been counted on to
furnish the material this year have
become ineligible because of low marks
received in their examinations. Fif-
teen letter men were scheduled to re-
turn this year, but because of ineligi-
bility scarcely half a dozen Tiger let-
ter men will return to form a nucleus
for the 1921 squad.
Since the freshman eleven was ex-
tremely mediocre, and many of them
have likewise flunked out-, the pros-
pects for a W'inning team for the Tig-
Comn unicathons
A FRIEND IN NEED
IS A FlRIEND INDEED I

ers seems doubtful. The
staff alone remains intact
Keene Fitzpatrick, former.
track coach, will be Roper's
man.

coaching,
in which
Michigan
right hand

Richards May Enter Yale
Vincent Richards, sensational ten-
nis star from Yonkers, N. Y., it is
rumored, intends to enter Yale this
fall. Richards is one of the greatest.
tennis experts in the United States,
and his addition to the Eli team would,
almost be certain to give Yale the in-
tercollegiate tennis honors, won this
year by the net team from Leland
Stanford.
Illinois Loses Hellstrom
Everett Hellsfrom, end and punter
on last year's Illinois varsity, has been
lost to the squad this year because
of a broken leg. Hellstrom was em-
ployed in a construction camp in Iowa
this summer where he met with the
accident wh.ich resulted in a broken
leg. His injury is believed to render
his playing entirely out of the ques-
tion.
Hellstrom was an all-around athlete,
winning letters in football, basketbiall
and baseball. His punting against
Michigan last year was especially not-
iceable in which he outdistanced the
Wolverine punter who was booting the
pigskin while Steketee was on the in-
jured list. There is also a questiqn as
to whether Carney, the other Indian
end will be able to play, but a re-
cent operation upon his injured knee,
it is believed will enable him to re-
sume his old position.
Kansas to Rave New Stadium
Work has been begun on the new
stadium and athletic field of the Uni-
versity of Kansas. It is expected that

'"I want to say that Michaels signed
his name as under the American Le-
gion, which shows that he has no au-
thority from the Disabled American
Veterans to speak for them," said
Charles C. Quitman, summer school
law student yesterday, 'in commenting
on the recent accusation of H. E.
Michaels, adjutant of the Bentley post,
No. 50, of the American Legion at
Cincinnati, to the effect that Quitman
is not founder of the Disabled Veterans
organization which he represents.
A letter to Quitman from Judge Rob-
ert S. Marx, president of the organiza-
tion, says in part': "You certainly
,were one of the men who were fore-
most in the founding of the Disabled
American Veterans of the World
War."
Use Wolverine want ads. They bring
results.-Adv.
HOME-COOKED MEALS :-
: Served at RHODES =
= 211 SO. INGALLS
,a liliil ililliifillill III~ illIIIII1 III11111111111

I!



~'T
%AE*L

O UR perfect plumi
vice is offered
those who are desi
getting superior wort
sistent prices. Re:
our telephone numb
may be useful to use
of an emergency.

W. M.

Plumbing and HE
Phone 525 211 So.

We invite your inspection of our
Woolens--- It pays to order early, be

the rush

of Student business starts---

J. Karl Malcoli
604 East Liberty Street

TYPEW
For Ret

ien he uses page
it a fine art crit-
still more when
to fight his an-
in to blush!

t
i
l
.1
'1
1

the stadium will be nearly enough =
completed for the annual Kansas- E
Missouri football game this fall. This
game is one of the big contests in the :
Missouri Valley conference. More :
than $600,000 has been subscribed to :
the Kansas stadium.
The athletic field will contain a foot-
ball field, a baseball diamond, and a
quarter mile running track, with a 220 :
yard straight-away track. It will seat
32,000 people. R.

T,

HAMILTON IU
STATE

SCHEDULE

-Mt. Union at Ann Ar-

Ann Arbor.
at Ann Arbor.
at Ann Arbor.
at Urbana.

at Madi-
at Ann Ar-

fise

r....

.oats

Editor, The Wolverine:
It is indeed disgusting to read in
the columns of The Wolverine, a so-
called criticism of G. D. E. by one who
calls himself "Sympathizer." This
"Sympathizer" goes on to make fun of
a writer, whona I regard as sincere, en-
terprising, and original. The authort
of the lively little column, headed,
"Critique," is doing something in a
way of literary criticism which de-
serves unlimited support and gener-
ous 'assistance. We must remember
that 'nc university paper is fortunate
enough to boast of a literary column
on books and writers. A graduate of
Harvard recently told me that he wish-
ed his college had had such a depart-,
ment. By investigation I have discov-
ered that Princeton, Yale, Columbia,j
and Cornell are without a publication
in which current works of literature
are criticised. It. is. thus fortunate for
us at Michigan, that, G. D. E. has un-
dertaken and continued, in spite of such
meaningless, self-appointed critics as
"Sympathizer," a column worthy of
every student's consideration.
Why is G. D. E. so irritatingto "Sym-
pathizer"? Is it because he has re-
fused to follow the old path of con-
servative sugary style? Any one can
play safe and use meaningless words,
but oh, for the writer with originality!
Here is G. D. E. who is clever, sin-
cere, and an original writer, making
an attempt to do his bit through the
literary column. And we have the sad
spectacle of an' ass, braying aloud be-
cause, through stupidity and Hooligan
ideas, he cannot comprehend some-
I thing worth while when he sees it.
The "Sympathizer" lets loose his
wrath upon G. D. E., because he has
read too many of, %itut Hamsun's
books. G. D. E. is accused of "showing
off" before the University. Who would
pass over an author who has appeared
before the world as a Nobel prize win-
ner? I, for one, wish to know some-
thing of Hamsun. Perhaps "Sympath-
izer" will write us- a review on "The
Recreation of Brian Kent" or on "Des-
ert Gold"?

Wieman A a Coach
With the addition of "Tad" Wieman
to Yost's coaching staff, one of ;the
most capable and popular athletes of .
recent years will be added to the Wol-
verine staff of coaches. Wieman will :
probably assume the duties of a line :
coach although Tad has more thanT
once demonstrated his ability as a
backfield man.
In 1917 when Yost was hard pressed
for a fullback, he took Wieman from
the line where he had earned an en-=
viable reputation as a tackle, and shift-
ed him to the backfield, where he per-
formed as fullback. Big Tad was im-
mediately given the name of Tank
Wieman for he literally rolled over the
opposing lines in his plunges. As a -
goal kicker Wieman has had few sup-
eriors at Michigan, and it was his loss "
in the Illinois game, together withl
Steketee's injury that resulted in Mich-
igan missing the kick after a touch-
down in the second quarter.
Yost has always had great respect
for Wieman's ability as a player and
as a coach, for the big Wolverine
tackle and back has coached in Los
Angeles, and this spring aided in the
early practice. It will be interesting
to note that Illinois is also employ-
ing a new coach from the ranks of its
rec'ent players. Ingwersen has been
chosen to assist Zuppke. Bith Wieman
and Ingwersen are among the best
tackles developed in the middle west,
although Wieman has also quite a
name as a full back. Both men are
well schooled in the respective styles
of coaching employed by their head
coaches.

LLOYD HAMILTON

in

"'THE GREEN HORN"
Other Attractions- Topics- Majestic Orchestra- Tr
TOMORROW and Z YURSDAY
"P'OLLY WITH A P.J

L LAST TWO TIMES TONIGHT
TH O MAS
MEIGHAN
-IN-
Ie Conquest of Canaan"
ADDED- BIG MERMAID COMEDY

Starring Captibating

INA CLA

,
:i

OH BOY! They said she was the v
woman in Paris! Polly had a little
really was alarming, yet how coul
think her fast-her smile was so d

And BIGa

CENTURY

"SOCIETY DC

LATEST

NEWS

Showing: 2:00 - 3:30 - 7:30 -

I

THEATER

SHOWS AT

2, 3:30, 7,

8:40

n. H.E.
24-1

Because G. D..E. is candid and orig-
inal, the "Sympathizer" who refuses
to have his initials attached to his pre-
embryonic style of criticism, (although
the dead have their names upon the
tombstones) becomes excited, and
shakes his ears skeptically. A mule
should keep off the race track, for
turpentine would fail to revive his en-
ergies. I had, rather make an effort
at writing thanf ridicule another's ef-
forts. The best way to criticize one,
is to beat him at his own game. Why

LA S T T I'M E

T O D A Y

L A S T T I M E
NORMA TAL

MAHLON HAMILTON
in
"THE TRUANT HUSBAND"
WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY
WARREN KERRIGAN
in

"N

99'!~

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