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August 23, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THRI
A'

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 23, 1921. PRICE

JALIER1Y APPOINTED' DAILY
BUSINESS MANAGER
Vernon F. Hillery, '23, appoint-
advertising manager of the
21-1922 Michigan Daily, has
en named by the Board inl
ntrol of Student PublicationsI
business manager, to take the
ce of Edward R. Prfehs, '22,
o was drowned near Saginaw
Aug. 15.
Hillery ,Teas been actively con-
cted with the business depart-
ant of The Daily for the past
o years, and was also busi-
s manager of the 1920 Wolver-
He was president of the
>homore class last year, and
t spring was elected to the
ident Council for the year
1-1922.
LSEMI-FINALS
I TENNIS MEET

PROSPECTS FOR
FALL ROOMS GOOD

SET' DATES FOR 4-
FRESHMEN EVENTSi
Union and Student Council Place
Gptherings Nearer Opening
of School
PRES. BURTON TO ADDRESS
CLASS OF '25 SEPT. 26'

Stevens, '23, Committee
Says Everyone Can
housed

Chxa.irman,

TO HEAD
FO 0HTHEIJ
HAS BEEN FOR YEA
OF PIANO IN
TIOi
MOORE IN CHA
MUSIC DEP

Over Olmacher, While
Defeats Zook in

'IRITED
ME1t TOURNEY

in the semi-final round of the
r school tennis toux'nament
out the most spirited play
s yet been seen here this sum-'
orich defeating Olmacher, and

petwee
a hotly
ere in t

orich and 01-
tested one, as
form. Rorich
to serve. Hisl

was hard and- accur-
the game for him. 01-
ocated by winning his
h was playing a beau-
e, while Olmacher was
r perfect back court
A high lob by Olmacher
point for Rorich, as lhe
d, smashing with his
g power, placing the
s opponent could note
Wins First .Sep
play was the kind in
excells. He is always
int, whenever he gets
kill" the ball- with a
ad smash. He won the
d set Olmacher seemed
Lence and stroked th '
fashion, and was using
,and. Olmacher led 3-1
en Rorich tookra brace
occurate side line shots
steady vollying evened
he next games broke
e game stood at 5-all.
a took the lead but was
rich until the set stood-
er then took a decided
n the next two games

1,400 SAID TO HAVE FOUND
ACCOMMODATIONS ALREADY
"There will be 'plenty of rooms
available for all .students next fall,"
predicted James C. Stevens, '23,
chairman of the rooming committee,
yesterday, in commenting op the re-
sults of the canyass recently put on
by this committee. Accommodations
for 1,800 men were found, but such
a great number of houses could not
be visited, due to the owners beig
out of town, that a re-canvass is to be
conducted for a week, starting Sept. 5.
Thid canvass will be conducted'over
some 450 houses, as yet unvisited.
"Approximately 1,400 men have al-
ready secured rooms for next year;
this, together with those listed by the
committee, will more than provide
quarters for the returning students,"
said Stevens. .t
The Rooming bureau will open in
the reading room on the second floor
of the Union Sept. 20, the first day of
registration, where complete informa-
tion concerning all rooms will be
handled In. the meantime, the work
is to be 4one in Dean7Bursley's office
in University hall, where the tabula-
tions and printed lists will be' com-
pleted.
COUNRY PAEoRET
SCHOOL_SAYS HAIES
MICHIGAN GRAD GIVES SECOND
TALK BEFORE CLASSES
IN JOURNALISM
Upholding and empha zing the state-
ment that the office of a small newspa-
per is the best place to learn practical
,iournalism, Donal Hamilton Haines,
'09, journalist and author, who will ally
himself this fall with the teaching
staff of the department of journalism
of the University, spoke informally be-
fore the class in newspaper organiza-
tion and management, Monday morn-'
ing.
"Aie who works on a small town1
paper," said Mr. Haines, "works as a
man in a laboratory, conducting in-
vestigations with .a microscope. He
labors, unhampered by the strain1
which binds the reporter ot a metro-
politan paper.1
"The small town paper should bel
the perfect school for journalism. On
such a journal, a man writes in a
small way what he will one day write
-in the large. The country newspaper,
offers the main opportunity for stu-
dents of journalism to come up from
the ranks," he said.
Mr. H'Ines also consxde'ed the pol-
icy, adapted by so many country pa-;
pers, of making the scoop the- pre-
dominate aim in their news gath-
ering. "The anxiety of a small town
edtor to get a piece of news first is
responsible for the efforts of many
country papers to scoop their com-
petitors," he said, "and trouble may
easily arise from such efforts." He
went on to show, however, that, with-
out local competition and without the
incentive to beat the other in getting
news, a paper is apt' to grow stale.
In this is the scoop of value, according
to Mr.'Haines.
Throughout his talk, Mr. Haines il-
lustrated his remarks by incidents
from his own experiences, gained on a
small Southern Michigan daily.
Focl Plans Indefinite
Boston, Aug. 23.-Marshal Foch of

France, is unable at present to make
any definite 'plans to come to the Un-
ited States, he said in a cable-message
received by Mayor Peters, Monday. The
message'was in reply to an invitation
to visit Boston.

Dates for the tirst four events given
during the fall term for the incoming
students under the auspices of the
Union and Student council were an-
nounced yesterday. Two pf the dates
have been moved up nearer the, open-
ing of the University, in order to get
in touch with the freshmen and if
possible develop more class and Mich-
igan spirit.
The fall reception for President
Marion L. Burton will be held Sept.
26 in the Union. The entertainment
wil be informal and will be concluded
by an address of welcome to the
freshmen by the President.
Traditions day will be earlier next
fall, the date as now decided on being
Sept. 30. The instruction in Michigan
traditions and spirit tht this annual
assembly can give to the new st-
dents will be mnore effective during the
first week of enrollment, it is felt
The date of the first official convo-
cation in Hill auditorium will be Oct.
6. "President Burton willaddress all
students in the University in this
meeting, the first of a series to be held
during the year.
The Michigan Union entertainment
for freshmen of all departments will
come Oct. 12, earlier than it has ever
been held before. 'rIt is hoped that
this arrangement of dates will give
the incoming students a better op-
portunity for making acquqaintances
among their classmates than, a later
time would permit.
INVESTIGTIONEING
M D +INTO 2 EATH
An investigation is being made by
Coroner Burchfield to determine the
exact causes of the two a'ccidents oc-
cuirring here last week-end which re-
sulted in the deaths of two women,
Miss Sophie Schmidt, 69, of Ann Ar-
bor, the daughter of the first Luther-
an minister to settle here, and Mrs.-
William G. Kennedy, 3011 Holcomb
avenue, Detroit.
Police officials say that the car in
whieh Mrs. Kennedy was sitting at
the time it was struck by a car driven
by Howard Tews, a dental student in
the University, was parked' on - the
wrong side of the street between Is-
land park and' the 'Whitmore Lake
road at the time of the accident Cor-
oner Edwin C. Ganhorn, of Detroit,
was called to make an investigation
of die case, and began an autopsy to
determine" the cause /of death.
The accident which was the cause
of the death of Miss Schmidt, when
she was hit by a car driven by Walter'
Armsbruster at Main and William
streets, was' not due to fast drivIng,
according to the statement of Mr.
Armsbuster to Coroner Burchfield. He
claims he did not see her until he
struckher in passing a street car.
NO TROUBLE FOR
TROOPS EXPECTED
Action of Sending Malnes to 'Pan-
ma Merely Precautionary '
Washington, Aug. 23.-While United
States marines were sailing southward
Monday to stand by when Costa Rica
marches here forces into the tiny bit
of territory whose ownership Panama
has so earnestly and Tong contested.
officials here expressed the opinion
they would have a pleasant cruise and
probably never fire a rifle.
The navy department was requested
by the state department to send the
marines and Secretary Denby of the

former department slid the action was
purely, precautionary. He emphasized
that no action was anticipated and the
belief generally was felt that the ter-
ritorial dispute would'be amicably ad-
justed.
Secretary Hughes' note to the gov-
ernment of Panama, published Mon-
day, definitely declared it the opinion
of the state department that there ex-

Institution Long Accused of
Merely an Agricultural
School
NEW PRESIDENT THOUGHT'
WELL SUITED TO

TASK
.

Lansing, Aug. 23.-Prof. David Fri-
day, who in January, .will become head
of the Michigan Agricultural college,
faces one of the most difficult tasks
assigned in recent years to the head of
any state institution.
For several years past, M. A. C. has
been accused of being an agricultural
college with no thought'for the farm-
ers of the state. The attitude of the
legislature was clearly defined in its
1921 session, when the house ways and
means committee approved an appro-
priation and a mill tax apportionment
only after it had been given tentative
assurance by members of the state
board of agriculture and by Governor
Groesbeck. that sweepinig changes in
the conduct of the .college would be
made.
Too Much EngineeringC
Some of the most prominent com-
plaints recently lodged against the col-
lege were that it is devoting more time
to engineering and other courses than
to agriculture; that it is not looking
after the farmers of the state as the
scientific institution .representing the
farmers should; that it has not ex-
pended its money wisely and that it
has not sought legislation designed to
favor the agricultural interests.
Professor Friday comes to, the col-
lege as practically a self made Mich-
igan man. He partially worked his
way through the University. Then he
accepted a position as instructor. In
a few years he had acquired consider-
able fame as an economist. His advice
was widely sought and his, reports
widely quoted. During the past year
the state has called upon him several
times for advice in flnancial matters.
His main reason for refusing to accept
the presidency, of M. A. C. Sept. 1,
when the new school year starts, was
(Continued on Page Four)

Being

PROF. ALBERT LOCKWOOD, WHO
WILL HEAD THE SCHOOL OF
MUSIC UNTIL A SUCCESSOR TO
DR. ALBERT A. STANLEY IS SE-
CURED.
BIG JOB "FACES
FRIAY1T 1AIC.

Great i

While arrangements are
for the appointment of a
for the School of Music to
Albert A. Stanley, Prof. A
wood, who has been for
head of the piano departme
appointed acting director of
Prof. Earl V. Moore, who h,
assistant conductor of the
ion, will lead the chorus
acity of acting director.
Moore will also be in cha
depa: tment of music.
Professor Lockwood 'w
some time ago, by a writer
view of Reviews, as one o
grei't pianists this countr
duced, the other two bein
Dr. William Mason and the
liam H. Sherwood. Throug
inary in the Literature of
forte," Professor Lockwooi
have exercised a unique i
the past, this being the
course offered it any Amer
of music.
An unusually big year is
the School of Music during

for ca
ice eni

and advai
received
of the cou
ment tha
is expecte

at

During the seaso
st tents were regis
about 40 states an
year a larger prop
rolled is 'said to i
vanceO students w
f r professional ca
sional musicians w
coaching or doing

VETERANS WILL LEA'
FORT SHERIDAI
Arrangements have b
the transportation to F
Ill., Saturday of all fede:
who are going to the v
tion camp to be held the
to James C. Stevens, '23
the local chapter of Gun
The train on which th
to Chicagq will leave
Central station at 9 o'
time, Saturday morning.
plan on going to the ca
to 'meet at 7:30 o'cloc
evening, at the Michig
discuss camp athletics
ments under which they
tered during their stay
idan.

st set; as the
seemed to tire
k advantage of
age Four)
Ann
nywhere,

Famous De Witt Cliiton Train
Pay Visit To Ann Arbor On Thra

, however, was the
the side of the star-
und the world, via
. It also. indicated
China, Japan, Hon-
ia had already been'
:he party was head-I
gland, Moscow, Ber-j
and India-meaning
s wife were not long
ir local sight-seeing
a pleasant looking
ture, with a rather
whiskerment on his
p, a ready smile, and
Mrs. Thein proved
a less amiable than
ugh attired in khaki

Michigan Central authorities an-
n6unce that the DeWitt Clinton train,
an exhibit of the New York Central
lines at the Pageant of Progress ex-
position, Chicago, will be in Ann Ar-
bor Thursday morning, Aug. 26, from
9:15 until 10:45, city time.
This train first ran 'over the Mo-
hawk and Hudson railroad on Aug.
9, 1831, the original unit of the New
York Central lines. On this 'initial
run, the DeWitt Clinton attained a
maximum speed of 30 miles an hour.
Returning from Schenectady to Al-
bany with five coaches, required but
38 minutes.
Built in 1831
The DeWitt Clinton was built by
the West Point foundry in 1831. It
was taken to Albany by tow boat, ar-
riving at its destination on July 25.
As first built, it weighed only 6,758
pounds, but since remodeled, it weighs
94,200 pounds.- Each coach weighs-
3,420 pounds, making the total weight
of the train 25,000 pounds.
A standard Pacific type locomotive

9 inches in length; a n
tive is 78 feet 2 3-8
12 feet 5 3-8 inches 1
DeWitt Clinton train.
Plans for the DeWii
made by. John B. Jer
neer of the Mohawk at
Dave Matthew was the
built the locomotive a
the first engineer. Rec
John T. Clark was th
or, and fares were col
quisa de Lafayette W
Goold -contracted to bi
for $310 each.
Saw Four Years
After four years of
the DeWitt Clinton v
Karner, near West Alb

i
~
,L

Famous Indoor Sports
aul, Aug. 23. - A quintuple
ite jump-five chutes released
P.i + fa ta in n OAnnf'

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