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August 16, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-16

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olurrnre

AT YOUR DC
THREE. TI
A WEEK

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

Varied Comments Arise As To
2enefits To 2;e Derived From
Residence hereOf Robert Frost

CAL WETZEL '21E,
DROWNS IN LAKE
WHILE SWIMMING

R
f

"COURSE, OFF
FOR AUTUMN 7

'I

No sooner had the announcement of
he coming of Robert Frost to Michi-
an reached the ears of the judges of
cademic ethics, than a great amount
comment and opinion began to
>me to light regarding this novel ad-
entute in educational circles.
Refers Back to Announcement
This coment has been directed to-
ard the resume of the' plans for
ringing Frost to Ann Arbor as set
rth in President Marion L. Burton's'
inouncement, that:
MA i
IGHT gU.Of MIMEN
MAKE1"RIFLE TEIMi

iniI

(ompete in National Matches
To Be Held At Camp Perry,
Aug. 27 to Sept. 22
:T WILL INCLUDE MORE
THAN SIXTY VARIED EVENTS

only that the artist shall be merely a
human being. This time we have
chosen a poet. He will come to live
here in September and remain for a
year. Next time we may select a
painter, a' sculptor, or a scholar. A
gift of $5,000 from Former, Gov.
Chase S. Osborn has made the poet's
visit possible."
Dean Roy Flickinger, of Northwest-
ern university, although he would
give no opinion, says: "Nothing like
this has beezi planned at Northwest-
ern, but we are watching the experi-
ment very eagerly."
Prof. C. F. Taeusch, also of North-
western, states: "It would be a great
j stroke of genius if universities would
'adopt this definite pblicy. Many men
are hindered by classes. It's only a
scholarship plan for professors instead
of students."+
U. of C. Man Less Favorable
Prof. C. H. Judd, head of the college+
of education in the University of Chi-
cago, is less favorable. "I think it+
would do the institution more good if
the poet would give instruction in the
form of regular class work," he says
"Class work offers an unparalleled op-1
portunity for personal contact and in-
fluence with students."
Favorable indeed is the comment of.
Dean P. H. Boynton, professor of Eng-3
lish literature atthe University of1
Chicago, who says: "It is certain
that it will be a great thing for Mich-1
igan. This experiment represents an
interesting return to the patronage
systeril of artists which broke down1
about 150 years ago."
F010AY TO OBTA1N .
L LIE OF ABSENCEIll

HIDl MOTORED TO GREAT BEND
WITH FRIENDS FOR WEEK.
ED
ACCIDENT OCCURS
SUNDAY MORNING
Was Varsity Quarter-Miler and Mem-
ber of Student Council' and
Tau Beta Pi

"The student body will benefit im-
measurably by the contact of a great
and loving personality. We desire

Of the 14 chosen by Col. John S,
o 'Bursey, adjutant-general of Michigan,
to serve on the Michigan State Rifle
h team, .which will compete in the na-
tional matches to be held at Camp
Perry, Ohio, Aug. 27 to Sept. 22, eight
are students of the University. The
eight men chosen, however, do not
represent the University as prev'ously
stated, but are members of the Cfvilian
Rifle team. ,
The meet will include more than 60
events in which the small bore rifle,
the service rifle, pistol and revolver
will be used. The Michigan men will
enter all of the matches possible.
They are , particularly hopeful of
bringing back-the trophy in the inter-
collegiate match, in which six of the
eight men' from the University will
tompete.
The national match proper is to be
the final event; in it are entered teams
from the army, navy; marine corps
and R. o. T. C., besides a civilian and
national guard team from each state.
Although there are almost always 70
or more teams entered in this partic-
ular event, yet Michigan has always
placed among the first 15, only serv-
icq or professional teams heading her
Th University men who are mem-
bers of the team are Major C. E. Wil-
son, team captin; J. D. Lowry, '22;
Robert Moore, '23; J. D. Glunt, '23;
J. E. Good, '23E; J. B. Vlack, '23E; L.
tR. ,Gil118, }230; and A. . Robbins, '23.
The University will also be repreent-
ed at the camp by the R. 0. T. C. team,
as the Michigan team at Fort Monroe
was the winner of the 'rifle meet held
there.
Lawn Sprinkling
System at Union
New Ininovation
Go along in front of the Michigan
Union building and notice the lawn.
It is as smooth a patch of turf as can
be found anywhere.
Pass in front of the Union when the
grass is being watered. Up from the
sod protrude half a hundred tiny black
nozzles from, which sprays of water
pour, drenching the grass for 10 feet
in every direction.
Where do these nozzles go when the
water is turned off?-that it the ques-
tion which the chief engineer of the
Union apswered in a personal demon-
stration recently.
The Popup sprinkling system is the
name by which the new equipment at
the Union is known. The system con-
sists of a series of valves, placed
about an inch below the sod, at inter-
vale of '20 feet. When the 50' pounds
of Water pressure is turned on, these
valves, which in themselves are mina-
ture nozzles, open, projecting upward
and above the surface of the lawn.
Those near the building or the side-
walks, are so arranged that they will
throw water in only one direction.
When the water is turned off, these
valve-nozzles recede, allowing the
lawn to.be mowed. The engineer turn-
ed the water on and off to show how

Calvin G. Wetzel, '1E, Varsity qaurt-
er-miler, was drovined Sunday morn-
ing at Great Bend, a summer resort
on Lake Huron. A weak heart is
thought to have caused his collapse
while swimming, thus resulting in hire
death.
Wetzel, with a party of friends, mot-
ored to Great Bend Friday to spend
the week-end. Sunday morning sev
eral of the young men went in swim-
ming and his friends saw Wetzel sud-
denly disappear beneath the surface.
At a late hour last night the body
had not been recovered. -
Wetzel, who was better known by
his friends as "Cal," won his "A. M.
A." in track in 1919, and his "M" in
1920 and 1921. He was a member of
Tau Beta Pi, was a Student council-
man, president of the honor board inr
the engineering college, and a member
of Vulcans and Delta Tau Delta fra-
ternity.
Wetzel graduated from the ciyil eng-
ineering department last spring, and
previously to that from the Scott high
school in Toledo, where his family
formerly lived.
"Cal" was the son of Lewis C. Wetz-
el, superintendent of the Toledo Scales
company, who lives at 11032 Ouellette
avenue, Windsor, Ont. Since gkadua-
tion he had been employed as a
draughtsman in a Windsor draught-i
ing office.
Stands at Ferry
Feld Enlarged

CALVIN G. WETZEL, '21E, WHO
WAS DROWNED SUNDAY IN LAKE
HURON.
PLANS MADE FOR
Local Catholics hope t Erect Four,
Story Building by Fall of
1922;

ENTRANCE
SAME

RE QUITRE MEN'
AS THOSE OF
COLLEGE

STRUCTURE EXPECTED
TO ACCOMMODATE
Plans are being formed for

1l t
thel

HOPES TO COMPLETE INVESTIGA-
TIONS AND WRITINGS
WHILE AWAY
In all probability Prof. David Fri-
day, of the economics department,
will not be at Michigan next year,-as
he expects to obtain a leave of abs-
ence in order to carry out some in-
vestigstions and complete some w'rit-
ing which he is anxious to finish.'
Until the meeting of the Board of
Regents, however, nothing definate can
be decided. It is understood that Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton has no objec-
tions to Professor Friday's plaxn.
Whether or not Professor Friday ac-
cepts the presidency of Michigan Agri-
cultural college will perhaps be set-
tled when he meets the state agricul-
tural board in Lansing on Wednesday
of this week.

When additions to the Ferry field
stadium are completed Oct. 1, the
stands will accommodate 36,000 per-
sons, according to Glenn L. Alt, of the
civil engineering department. The,
average attendance at football games
has been about 28,000 in the past, it is
said, and the added facilities, in the
form of timber stands -adjoining the
cement construction, will make it pos-
sible to seat 14,000 more spectators. ~
A new sewage system is also being'
installed on the field, for which the
alterations, when complete, will cost
about $50,000.

erection of the University's first 'men'sG
dormitory on Jefferson and Maynard
streets, according to Rev. M. P.
Bourke, chaplain of the Students'
Roman Catholic chapel here. The new
building, which is expected to accom-
I modate 150 students, will be a four-
story U-shaped structure of stone and
brick. It will face Jefferson street.
The dining room and kitchens will
be on the first floor; the second floor'
will 'contain .a large assembly hall for
the inmates and Catholic college stu-
dents. The third and fourth floors'
will be taken up with sleeping quart-
ers and study rooms.
"Students will receive the best a;-&
commodations that we can possibly
give, consistent, of course, with the
minimum cost," said Rev.. Bourke in
an interview yesterday. "The building
will, cost abont- $200,000. I wish it
to be self-sustaining," he added.
It is hoped that the dormitory will
be ready for the fall session of 1922.
PREPARATION FOR
PLAY MARKED BY
REGULAR DRILLS
' The members of the cast' of "The
Servant in the House," the play byl
Charles Rann Kennedy, which is said
to have made a sensation when, played
in New York by the Henry Miller play-
ers some years ago, have been re-
hearsing every afternoon and evening
during the past two .weeks for the
performance to be given at 8 o'clock
Thursday evening in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. Dress rehearsal will be
held on. Wednesday evening, at which
time it is expected that the players
will be able to put the final touch to
their roles.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the de-
partment of public speaking, has given
much effort to the direction of the
play, and it is expected that the result
will please.,
Admission will be 50 and 75 cents.
Tickets can be- obtained at' Wah's.
PROFESSOR ADAMS
IS BURIFDD H ERE

GRADUATES KNOWN.
DENTAL HY GIE NI,
Anatomy, .PIhysiologj, . Bateri
Histology and Hygiene, Firs
Year Subjects
Oral hygiene, a two year'c
more generally known as dent
giene, is to be offered by the U
sity this fall, the graduate o:
course to be known as a:dent
gienist, or adentist's assistant.
legislature legalized, dental assi
because of the ~Jarge" number i
quests from the dentists of the
who are interested in better h
for everyone and especially thp
ren.
In spite of the fact that alrea
dental college _is' overcrowded,
25 or 35 students will be allo
enroll in the new course that
fered. Hundreds of requests
been received by the Universit
admission to the new departmen
because the new addition to the
'al building will not be complet
fall, only a few can be accommo
Next year, however, it is hope
two or three times as many a
number now admitted can be a
modated.
Joker Elilinated
The last session of the legis'
eliminated the only joke that e:
n the bill, when the clause tha
nuitted only women over 20 yea
to take the course was elimi
All men or women Who have the
its required for entrance to the
ary college will be allowed to
the course in dental hygiene.
matter of age limitation does n
uire in'the new bill as "drawn,u'
'passed.
The work for the first year w
mostly class work. The sec'nd
is to be largely clinical work,
either be done here i Ann A i
at any -of the state' instii tion
fact, many of the' state -anstiti
that ha", been without these d
assistants have requested that-
students be allowed to take thet
on( year's work there.
The position of fhe yoding hygi
in these institutions will be si
to that of an intern. They will r
maintenance, 'but no pay.
Tuition $100
Tution for the course will be
a year, which includes all labo
expenses. This, however, does n
elude books. If the second ye
spent at some institution the fei
be remitted.
Anatomy, physiology, hist
pathology,' bacteriology, materia
ica and hygiene are subject tha
be pursued the first year by sty
in the course. Another phase l
work will be diet, it being recog
that a clean mouth is impossible
out the aid of a regulated diet.
The' work of the 4ental hygie
definitely outlined by the laws c
state. He "can perfrom -such b
tions . upon the mouth and tee
are necessary in the removal o
posits and placing the mouth
hygienic condition," and the la
stipillates that the trained ora
genist cannot go on the roots e
teeth belo*v, the attachment c
gums.
PROF. GLOVER DELEGATE T(
PHARMA0fET lAL 1E
Prof. C. C. Glover, secretary
College of Pharmacy, has been d
ated as delegate for the Univers

the annual convention of Am
Pharmaceutical association anc
conference of pharmaceutical fac
to be held Sept. 5 and 6 in Ne
leans.
The American Pharmaceutical
ciation is said to be the large
ganization of its kind in the ci
and all institutions maintininen

'I

INTEREST OF
AROUSED

STATE EDUCATORS
OVER STUDENT SHOWINGS

Vote Almost Unanimous Against New
Entrance Requirements '
(By F.)
The state' papers of recent date ran
a short, but interesting story, giving
an account of the attitude of the ed-
ucators of the state toward the en-'
deavor of the faculty of the literary
college to reinstate -the entrance re-
quirements in vogue a decade ago.
The reason for the endeavor to
tighten up on the entrance require-
ments is the. "high mortality rate"
among freshmen during the past aca-
demic year.
Shortly before the war the faculty
listened to the demands of the voca-
tional subjects. The exigencies of the
war period demonstrated the wisdom
of this action, since the demand for
practical equipment grew apace. The
war period, however, brought with it
many complicated educational ques-
tioir. The greatest problem was the
large influx of students, which the
governing authorities could not or,
perhaps, would not foresee. They re-
ceived warnings sufficiently urgent.
4 Not Prepared
In short the University authorities=
were not prepared for the situation
which confronted them.
The classes were overcrowded in
practically every department. The

The most convenient solution was
to introduce a "closing out sale and
mark down." The orders were sent
out and the assistants marked down.
The "morality rate" was startling.
The faculty sed the hackneyed'
phrase "lack of preparedness" and
passed the buck to the high schools.
Reports were mailed to the high
school principals.
The principals read the reports with
mixed feelings and could not quite
comprehend the vital statistics. Their
most diligent students were often
marked down and their average stu-
dents often received higher grades
than ever before.
"Lame Ducks" Aboie Average
They, smarting under the darts of
criticism which rudely pierced their
usually complacent mental equili-
brium, woke up, at least to a certain'
extent. In the meantime intelligence
tests were made by the experts of
this interesting, but elusive science.
The results were rather confusing.
The "lame ducks" possessed intellig-
ence above the average.
"Lack of preparedness" came to be
the slogan more than before.
The representatives of the foreign
languages, especially the advocates of
the study of the basic language, Latin,
were not slow to take advantage of the,
situation. The historians, amazed at
the lack of knowledge of history, as

Last Minute Alterations in
Make Change Necessary

Plans'

Prof. Henry Carter Adams, for 34
years head of the partment of politic-
al economy, was buried in the Ann
Arbor cemetery Saturday afternoon, a
change of plans having been made at
the. ast minute,
Henry Carter Adams -was born in
Davenport, Iowa, Dec. 31, 1851. He
married Miss Bertha Wright of Port
Huron, in 1890, who survives him, to-
gether with three sons, Henry Carter
Adams, Jr., now with mercantile mar-
:ine, New York City; Dr. Theodore
W. Adams, member of the staff of the
Peterson hospital, and Thomas H.
Adams. '22, a senior in the Univer-

the
n is

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