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August 13, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WIomen

I--

vice To Freshmen" Filled With
Timely Suggestions To Yearlings

I

ACOU-STIC METHODS,
OUTLINED BY 'RICH

while Helen Newberry residence will be
lence. at home from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock
Kirk Tuesday afternoon to all women reg-
.o canistered in the Summer'session.

the

field.
and,
acks,

., and in
at Ohio
r to carry
end, but

More than 30 couples attended the
informal dance held at Helen New-
berry residence last evening, the sec-
ond given this summer. Betsy Bar-
bour dormitory entertained at the
same time.
Betsy Barbour dormitory will give
a tea Wednesday afternoon for all
women students enrolled in the library
methods course.

Bank, Uteritz.
1 shown mark-
eams,. Bank is
e trio who has
n Varsity, the
rs of Mather's
pring training
vell, and will

The Screen

AT THE MAJESTIC

e backfield posi-.
Dean, Fairbairn,
e of the new menj
the squad. Roby,
phy are all good
Kipke and Dean{
ld runners. Bothl
ers and their toes
case of ani injury'
, backfield, Steke-;
id Paper will be
:y these younger
ce of two sets of
>e a valuable as-
larily if- any in-

With the action taking place in
India and the United States, a dramat-
ic story of rebellion and intrigue on
the part of British army officers and
the native Indian chieftains, "The
Bronze Bell" is, to be shown at the
Majestic theater starting Sunday.
Har Dyal Rutton, an East Indian
prince, is called home from England
to the deathbed of his father, a native
potentate. The father makes him pro-
mise to lead an imminent native re-
bellion against the British.' This he
can not do, so he escapes to America,
there to live in seclusion until discov-.
ered by David Amber, whom he had
met previously in England. Their
striking resemblance gives rise to the
ruse of sending Amber back to India
to head the rebellion in order to save
the daughter of the British colonel in
command, with whom he is in love.
British agents discover the rebellion
in time to send for troops to quell it.
The romance is cleverly woven in to
make an absorbing' story.

rospects
ent, but
pre-sea-
ear will
eams in
ill be anl

It is seldom that really helpful sug-
gestions forover coming the proverb-
ial "greenness" of freshmen are offer-
ed to the prospective "frosh" before
he has had opportunity to see and
learn for himself. But now comes a
little book, "Advice to Freshmen-by
Freshmen," just published, which
gives a quantity of these very valu-
able and hard-to-formulate pointers to
"familiarize the coming freshman with
the existing conditions which must be
met during the first year at college,"
to quote the clearly expressed purpose
of the book as given in the preface.
Are Fitted For Task
The writers are pecularily fitted to
their task, for they are all freshmeni
members of a class in freshman rhet-
oric during the past year, who in
their themes on the subjects of the
various chapters of the book, have n-
deavored, as older and more sophis-
ticated freshmen who Have 'gone
through the mill, to give to their
younger brothers the benefit of their
year of experience.
The subjects chosen include prac-
tically every phase of freshmen activ-
,Critique
(Continued from Page Three)
disappointing. Two complexes of men.
and women have big posibilities, but
one of these Hamsun disposes of pre-
cisely as the vice commission would
pamphetize the ruination of a coun-
try lass; the other, worse yet, both
the man and his wife are unbeliev-
ably mawish. The poetic rake who is
the, lover of the women in both affairs
is far better drawn.
Without having the publisher's word
tor if, or other proof as authentic, I
shquld never believe that the same
man wrote both "Shallow Soil" and
"Growth of the Soil."
As for the translator's preface which
lauds "Shallow Soil" as Hamsun's
"most significant wrk"-Pish!
What Bjorkman Says
"The various phases of his (Ham-
sun's) campaign against city life are
also interesting and illuminating,
Early in his career as a writer he tried
an open attack in full force by a coup-
le of novels, "Shallow Soil" and "Ed
itor Lynge," dealing sarcastically with
the literary Bohemia of the Norwegian
capital. They were, on the whole
failures-artistically rather than com-
mercially. They are among his poor..
est books."'
".Pan" I shall try to review early in
the coming semester, or, possibly
next week. It is as good as "Shallow
Soil" is bad.
JOHNSON SAYS EDUCATION
SHOULD BE NATIONAL AIM
(Continued from Page One)
One doll'ar of government money will
bring out four or five from the people,"
said Mr. Johnson in reasoning for fed-
eral aid and oversight.
Old Age Insurance Needed
Emphasizing the importance of the
teacher in our schools, no matter how
fine our equipment, Mr. Johnson point-
ed out the necessity of some provision
for old age insurance; the turnover in
the teaching profession is about every
six years. In many ways this is an
,evil, but in more Ways it is a decided
benefit to the people in the long run.
"I predict," said Mr. Johnson in
closing, "that in 20 or 30 years all edu-
cational institutions will be united in
one general program in attaining the
end of a better trained citizenry."
CLASS IN PLAY PROIUCTION
OFFERS 3 ONE ACT DRAMAS

ity, and the treatment of them is as
enlightening as it is interesting and
appropriate. Such things as "High
School vs. College," "Getting Acquaint-
ed," the definition of the cardinal vir-
tues of a Michigan student, and prac-
tical advice in regrad to choosing your
room and roommate, and your conduct
in the boarding.house-all these things
are discussed..
A Word on Rushing
Certain remarks on "rushing," would
have saved many a freshman hours of
worry and misunderstanding if he had
heard them in time.. Campus tradi-
tions, campus activities, and, in fact,
everything about campus life which
you d not find in the official catalogue,
are dealt with. There is a timely
word or two about "co-eds" which
might even make one of the so-called
"co-ed haters" think it over.
In short,, it is a little book which
tells in a friendly,' informal way, the
"dos and don't's" which will give a
freshman a gentle boost over the first
few hard weeks, as well as help to lay
a good foundation for the rest of his
college career.

Says Three Factors Must be+
to Produce Auditoriums
Right Properties

SLIDES DEMONSTRATE MEANS
OF FOCUSING SOUND WAVES
"There is no reason why the mod-
ern architect should construct an au-
ditorium with poor acoustics," said
said Prof. D. L. Rich, of the physics
department, in his lecture last night
in Natural Science auditorium, on
"Acoustics of Auditoriums."
"There are only .three factors that
must be overcome in order to prQduce
a perfect sounding auditorium," he
continued, "and those are intensity of
sound, echoes, and reverberation. Mod-
ern investigation has found means to
overcome all these obstacles."
By apparatus and slides Professor,
Rich demonstrated how sound waves
were carried and reflected and the
means whereby they could be con-

Overcomej
With

..

BOOKS!

B OOKS!

Don't fail to
now 50c.

look over our special book sale.
Also a counter of scientific and

85d, popular copyright
technical books at 50c.

SEE OUR DISPLAY

.

W

A. H

h

S N I RVERSIT Y
BOOK STORES

the rear wall otte auditorium.'.
best means of overcoming the diffic
ty is by means of placing felt so as
absorb the sound waves. "All soft si
stances will absorb sound waves a
the best absorber known is the au
ence. Professor Rich also demonst:
ted how sound waves will turn cornE
-and that irregular walls, will ma
sound waves rebound far' better th
smooth ones.
The problem of acoustics is a pre
ing one due to the frequency of put
gatherings. The public in this mode
day demands that auditoriums a
public buildings be made as comfo
able as possible in order that tL
may be at perfect ease while list(
ing to the speaker. This was not ti
in the past, when the scarcity of pt
lic gatherings made performances
rare thing and the public was will
to contend with obstacles to h
them.
Slides were shown of several of
large theaters and auditoriums
which-the acoustics were poor, wh
echoes were produced, and how th
difficulties were overcome. "'T
stretching of wires across the ceili
has no effect upon the acoustics," s
Professor Rich in conclusion.

With acknowledgments to K. C. .

... ;

JR CH SERVICES
FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
Cor. State and Washington Sts.
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, Pastor
:Miss Ellen W. Moore, Student
Director
10:30 A. M.-"The Supreme
Loyalty." Rev. Dugald Mac-.
fayden. '
11:45 A. M.--Bible School. Stu-
dent's class in Auditorium of
Lane Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Social Half Hour.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's
Devotional Meeting. Miss
Dorothy Wood, Leader. Sub-
ject, "What Shall I Do for
-My Pleasures?"
All Students especially Invited
OPEN AIR
C A MP L S
SERV ICE

A 1bii'd ]lke &i
makes a moilel. husband

Ca

w

'I

for Sum-
at Bapt-
iast Hur-
"Book of

I tS-
ion.
Serv-

HER.NICE new husband.
STEPPED OUT of the house.
* * *
WHISTLING LIKE a bird.
WHICH ALARMED young wife.
ESPECIALLY WHEN.
* * .*
SHE FOUND she'd picked
* * *
THE WRONG package.
* * i*,
AND INSTEAD of oatmeal.
* * *
HAD GIVEN him birdseed.
BUT DON'T think from this.
THAT EVERY guy.
YOU HEAR whistling.
* * *
HAS NECESSARILY.
BEEN ROBBING the canary.
OTHER THINGS inspire.
* * *-
THE ALMOST human male.
TO BLOW through his lips.
* * *
AND MAKE shrill noises.
A RAISE, for example.
* * *
OR A day off when.
A DOUBLE header is on.
*
OR AN everyday thing.
* * *
LIKE A good drag.
ON ONE of those smokes.
'* * *
THAT SATISFY.
WHICH CERTAINLY are.
* * *~
THE REAL birdseed.
FOR MAKING men.
* * *
TRILL THCIR pipes for joy.
SO LADIES, if hubby.
* * .*.
GOES AWAY whistling.
* * *
YOU NEEDN'T worry.
ALL'S SWELL.-'
* * *

I4

7:30 P. M-'

Speaker:
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Minis-
ter in Charge, St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church.
Subject: "The Mountaineer's
Equipment."
YOU ARE INVITED

*

TO Is

' .

- -

GA TIONAL CHURCH

10:30

wl

Plymouth Congre-
Lawrence, Kansas.

(Continued from, Page One) '
fight. The pathos of the situation was
well brought out by the actors.
Sbeond Based on Double Selves
"Overtones," the second play, is
based on the fact that every one of
us has' two selves, the culturEd and
the primitive. Hence the title of the
play, for the cultured self is the "over-
tone." The four actresses in the ply,
represent two ladies carrying on a
conventional conversation, while the
'primitive selves make the cattish re-
marks which really occur to the minds
of these ladles. Many- humorous
'points are evolved in this manner. The
acting is very convincingly done, so
much so that we are ready to accept
this "other self.°"
"Tradition" tle Third
The third play, "Tradition," was
produced by the Players' club during
the last semester, but yesterday's ren-
dition was far better and much more
carefully wrought out.
The players showed little discom-
fiture or stage-fright, and all three
plays were received by an enthusiastic
auieInce ,

WHEN you say that Ches-
terfields " s a t i s f y,"
you're whistling. You know
-the instant you light one-
that the tobaccos in it are of
prime selection, both Tu ksh
and Domestic. And the blend
-well, you never tasted such
smoothness and full-flavored
body! No wonder the "satisfy-
blend" is kept secret. It can't
be copid,

In packages of 202priec ted
by special moisture-proof
wrapper. Also in round
AIR - TIGHT 'tins cf 50.'

a %Quartet Choir directed by
1 V. Moore, Organist.

- CIGARTTE

ally Welcomed

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