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August 11, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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AT YOUR E TI

A WEEK

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 11, 1921. PRICE FIVE

GUMD TO PRESENT
VAUDEVILLE SHOW,
"Flashlight" is the name given to
the vaudeville entertainment to bed

TAP ROOM LOWERS SUNDAE PRICES1
STATESTREE[T 'DEALERS STAND PAT

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TENDER LUNCHEON
TO 63 SCHOOLMEN
Sixty-three schoolmen were enter-
tained at luncheon Wednesday noon
by the Rotary club of Ann "Arbor.
George Oscar Bowen opened the pro-
gram by leading the company in sing-

U

S NEW

presented by the Wesleyan guild of the
First Methodist church at 8 o'clock
Friday esvening in the church parlors.
The program will be featured by
K. Tang and Cyrus Tavares, the tv c
Hawaiian musicians who appeared at
the Union Spotlight. Other numbers
will readings by Miss Emma,Leonard:
and by Mr. George Leonard, of the
public speaking repartment.
"The J-Hop Tj al." of Jones versus
,Smith, a dramatic skit, will be the
leading vaudeville stunt of the eve-
ning Refreshments and a general
sing will comp'ete the evening's pro-
grami.

Latest Reduction at Union, a Cut ofI sodas at Calkins', however,

'I

25 Per Cent, is Effective Im-
mediately

17 cents.
. "Cokes" at 5 Cents
"Cokes" are one feature of the U n-

ITER
NTION
Problemns

rvision of
ally train-
ui in rais-

sell for

hing schools
y Dean S. A.
eachers' col-
lecture, "Or-
n," delivered
rnoon in the
mn. He based
that special-
iced remark-
t schools.
atter of tak-
' Dean Cour-
be unity of
g about this

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KEDRICK SPEAKS
OF JUNi'OR HIGH
Enulierates Mathematical Conrses
Suggested for School Cur-
riculuins

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"COKES" SERVED AT HALF ion, the charge there having always
CHARGE ASKED ELSEWHERE been five cents as against 10 . cents
elsewhere. For root beer and Ver-
npr's ginger ale 10 cents is charged
With two more reductions made in there ,but the former is served in 12
the prices of sundaes at the Union tap ounce glasses and one bottle'consti-
room bar, charges of the Ufion are tutes a serving of the latter. Some
said to average considerably lower than dealers are said to use a regular
prevailing prices in stores on State "coke" glass for serving all soft drinks
street, in spite of the fact that all cam- its capacity being rated at six ounces.
pus soda fountains, including the tap An investigation was also made xe-
room, are furnished with ice cream cently of the method used in the tap
by Connor's Ice Cream company. room for washing the dishes u'sed at
The latest reductions of the Union the soda bar. The glasses are' first
were given out last night, when it was rinsed in a tank of hot running water,
announced- that the price of titter- placed vertically in the center of which
sweet and marshmallow sundaes, form- is a brush over which the glasses are
erly 20 cents, would belowered to 15 also turned so that the inside is thor-
cents immediately. oughly cleansed. They are then up-
Other Prices Lower turned over' an automatic glass wash-
Other prices charged by the Union er, and are thus rinsed out with
tap room, however, seem already to be streams of cold water.
lower than the average charged on The spoons are thrown in the tank
State street. .Malted milks there are of warm running water and allowed
20 cents, which price includes the war to remain there for some'time. Paper
tax, whereas all other items are 15 dishes are used for serving sundaes,
cents and less. All sundaes athe tap these, of course, requiring no washing.,
room are 15 cents, including fruit dish- "W, have one of the cleanest placesz
es, on which pure fruit is> used. The in town," said 0. H. Ries, the man-s
Union uses a number 12 scoop, heap- ager of the tap room bar, in comment-s
ing, for a sundaes, At the Calkins- ing on his'equipment last night. "Alsof
Pletcher company, a representative it's the gospel truth that we alwaysx
State street store, syrup sundaes are have been lower in price than any f
17 cents and crushed fruit sundaes other local place."1
and sodas are listed as 22 cents. The Union, moreover, claims to givec
All sodas served at the Union are better service than most other places
[5 cents. These, according to the in' town. According to Ries, when 1
nanager of the bar, are made with a men at Union dances come down to thec
number 16 scoop of ice cream and pure bar during the intermissions, all of r
sweet cream is mixed with the syrup them, usually amounting to more than p
n making the liquid. Fruit syrup (Continued on Page Four)

ing od familiar songs, and Senator
S. A. Sink spoke on the significance of
the Rotarian movement.
Supt. J. W. Sexton, of the Lansing
schools, responded to Senator Sink in
an effective discourse on the "Rotary
Spirit as Incorporated in the Schools."
The three points especially stressed
were the development of character
the ideal of service, and the sense of
responsibility taught ths school boy.

SAYS HOSPITAL BUYS SPECL
SHOES FOR CRIPPLED
PATIENTS
CHRISTENSEN MAKES
'10 FURTHER COMMEN
State Board Suggests Closer Co-o
oration to Avoid Waste at
University

PLAN "OF UNIONS
1,500,000 Workers Voice Approval on
Wage Reduction
Strike
INTEREST CENTERS ON
MEETING AT CLEVELAND

CARIEFUL
DAI

STUDY OF PRESENT
DISCIPLINE IS N'EDf )

h of organization
the early days,
ad but a single
nts of various
by' one teacher
principal, to the
schools and in-
it Systems,.
system teachers
e 'principal only,
the authority of
The supervisors
riment for solu-'
nges to the sup,-
ends odrfr

"The organization of junior high,
schools is one of the most Impor'aint
moves in this country," said Prof. E.
R. fedrc h, of the University of Mis-
souri, in his lecture, "Junior High
School Mathematics," given yesterday
afternoorn in the Na' ural Scienc(. a
diturium. He continued with a de-
scription of the mathematic courses to
be acluded in the curriculum.
"The real junior high school move-
nent involves a reorganization of tie'
entire seventh and eighth grades, e -
pecially as far as Oairtzents arc
concerned," he declared. "A r-,rgar.-
ization f mathematics is Trost nport-
ant, and gives us a chancetto start
afresh, and make them as they should
be.

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Washington, Aug. 11.-With all Am-
erican Federation o 'Labor railroad
unions, representing 1,540,000 workers,
voicing their approval of a general
strike on account of wage reductions
interest has been centering on the
meeting today of the chiefs of the "big
four" brotherhoods in Cleveland who
have not as yet given their approval
of a general .strike.
The "big dour" chiefs are holding
back their decis on until a reply is re-
ceived from the executives of eastern
railroads to the brotherhoods' demands
presented to them last week in New
York. If the answer is not satisfactory
he four brotherhoods are expected to
oin in the strike.
If ax strike is called the 'union lead-
ers hope to tie up all the railroads in
he country. Unless the "big four"
oinj many leaders do not exect
general strike. It is feared, how-
ver, that unofficial strikes in various
arts of the country will be called be-
ore Sept. 1,,when there will be a gen-
ral walk-out.

Holding to his policy of yesterday
maintain silence regarding the charg(
of the state administrative board r
lative to the "reckless" spending c
state money by. University official
John C. Christensen, assistant secrE
tary and purchasing agent of the Un
versity, this morning refused to ad
anything to the statement made Wed
nesday by Robert J. Greve, busines
officer of the University hospital, i
explaining certain &4 the hospital e
penditures.
Mr. Greve has explained the cost c
shoes purchased by the hospital, fe
which the state charges that entirel
too much money was paid, by sayin
the shoes were designed for patient
who 'required braces on their instep
or legs, and that ordinary footwea
could not be used.
The Lansing dispatch read as fol
lows:
"Closer co-operation' between th
state departments and the Universit
of Michigan and the Michigan Agri
cultural college, with the object o
preventing the 'reckless' spending o
state money, is to be sought by the
state administrative board.
"The question' of how the so-callec
'constitutional institutions' are spend
ing their state aid money came up a
a meeting of the board today. A state
ment for the purchase yf shoes was re
ceived from the University hospital
and according to the items listed, the
shoes were purchased, apparently fo
state charges, at a cost of from $10 to
$12 a pair. They could have been pur.
chased, members of the board believe
through the state purchasing depart-
ment for less than half that amount.
"Although the two institutions nam
ed have a constitutional right to spend
their state aid money as they please,
officials of the University and M. A. C
will be asked to work with a committee
of the board to devise means of closer
co-operation with the state depart.
ments and to cut down what members
of the board termed the 'absurd uses
of the state's money'."

Kennedy 's Play Presets Religious.
Expression Through Service To ien

he pr'
prob]
of
al fo
so-
perat
irit,"

incipal Who 'A committee has been formed to in-
lems in his vestigate the best means for teaching,
organization mathematics. The primary purpose of
r the detec- the study of mathematics should be to
lutions for give an understanding of its prin-
Ion and not ciples, and to make these powers effec-
said Dean tive for the individual. The commit-
tee has made a study of the present
Four) day status of discipline and has cir-
culated/a questionnaire among educa-
nntional leaders.' The attitude of the
hG --commitee will be that discipline i
to be. regarded as a useful by-pro-
duct of all instruction and particularly
of mathematical instruction. The top-
ics will/be chosen with a view to life
GDS DOWN cutside the class room and a better
TRAL appreciation of civilization."
T Professor Hedrick gave a list of the
suggested mathematical courses for
of the Wol- the three-year junior high school.
ike up pro- Arithmetic is to be taught, on the basis
s was third of a minimum of preparation in the
r three sea- grade school. The topics which are
were chain- not npw in common use in the outside
o had three worl4 are to be omitted.
ition to one
ear Karpus HENDERSON'$ DAUOHTER
lverine five BURIED IN ALPENA

latest'
s to to

(ky T. E. R.). sorts of readers and theater goers.
Charles Dann Kennedy, the author "The Terrible Meek" is founded upon
of "The Servant in the House," which the New Testament story of the Cru-
will be presented on Aug. 18 and 19, cifixion. "The Servant in the House"
by the class in play production, un- concerns itself with the practical and
der the supervision of Prof. R. D. T. spiritual life and problems of the fam-
Hollister, of the oratory department, ity of an English clergyman.
was an English citizen at the time he Aroused Great Interest
wrote the play. He was born at This was one of" the most famous
Derby in 1871. playsof its year, 1908, anywhere. It
During the Great War Mr. Kennedy aroused immense interest in its main
became a resident of the United States idea, not because that idea was new
and, his first naturalization papers (though it did seem new to some the-
now having been secured, he is well ater-goers, judging from their com-
on the way to becoming an American ments), but because it was presented
citizen. Kennedy was largely self- in a new and daring way. This main
educated. He has been an office boy, idea _is' simply that the highest relig-
clerk, actor, press agent, contributor ious expression is best made through
to magazines with articles, stories, and the simplest direct service to man-
poems, and a theatrical business man- kind. What made the play popular
ager. Since 1905 he has been engaged was that he thought of it as presented
chiefly in dramatic writing, through the medium o what is little
Eight Successful- Dramas else than a comedy of manners.
Between 1908 and 1919 eight suc- The play has already been present-
cessful dramas were written by 'Mr ed in Ann Arbor by the Henry Miller
Kennedy. Of these "The' Servant in players, and a few summers ago by
the House," and "The Terrible Meek," the students in the department of pub-
are the best known. lic speaking.. Few, if any, plays have
Both of these plays, although semi- been more successfully presented by
religious in both subject matter and students than was "The Servant in the
tone, are absorbingly interesting to all Hou ."
SUMMER CHORAL UNION AND ORCHESTRA
CONTRIBUTE TO SUCCESS.OF CONCERT
(ByV. T.) - also most pleasing, being a stirring
Both the Summer Choral union and offering which was unusually well
the Summer School orchestra contri- adapted t' choral work.
buted to the program offered at the Mr. Lindegren presented two groups
last complimentary concert of the sea- of solos, all of which were exception-
son, given last night in Hill auditor- ally well chosen, and which he sang
ium. In addition to the fine worlt of in a manner leaving nothing to be
these organizations, William Wheeler, desired either along the line of vocal
tenor, of the faculty of the School of ability or skill in technique. #is
Music, and Carl Lindegren, head of voice is clear and resonant, and his
the voice department of the Michigan enunciation is especially worthy of
State Normal college; appeared in solo note.
work which added the finishing mark The final number, "Hiawatha's Wed-
of excellence to the performance as a ding Feast," arranged by Coleridge-

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Second Sessio n
Gets Under Way
(By . C. Christian)
(Special Correspondent)
Topinabee, Aug. 10. - The second
session of Camp Davis is well under
way and Prof. Clarence T. Johnston,
director, is gradually moulding his
men into real woodamen as well as
surveyors. Sunburned arms and
shoulders, lame muscles, and chafed
hamg1s, have seemed to be the fad for
the past week. Next to eating, swim-
ming and baseball seem to be the most
popular sports.
The organization of the camp is now
complete, with "Culla" Beuthien as
camp manager. The other officers
elected are as follows : "Slim" Baker,
icamp sanitarian; "Louie" Pommer-
dning, athletic manager, and Joe
Baker, transportation manager.
The Black Fly, camp publication,
has also gotten) under way again. The
staff appointed is as follows: "Dick"
Potter, editor; "Mitch" Mitchell, bus-
iness manager; "Min" Shupert, art
editor; "Jim" Boucis, assistant art
editor; "Wils" Lyons, sport editor;
"Shorty" Bryant, flydust editor; and
"Red" Bandemer and "Joe' Riggs, as-
sociate editors.
Captain Collett on Leave
Capt. Forrest E. Collett, of the R.
0. T. C., is spending a forty-five day
lei ve of absence in Iowa.

I for the title. The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Rich-
h Bay City of ardson, the daughter of Prof. W. D.
is playing a Henderson, were held Wednesday from
An account her home in Alpena. Professor Hen-
papers says: derson left Ann Arbor for that city on
incidents of Monday, having at that time first re-
manner in ceived notification of the death of his
te of the Uni- daughter.
erformed - at Margaret Henderson was a mem-
e local boy's her of the Alpha Phi sorority. AboutG
and he stood three years ago she Was married tol
a veteran. Lee Richardson. A daughter, Mar-
't called Apon garet, was born to them on July 29.
game, and on Mr. and Mrs. Richardson have just
.e bobbled, al- recently moved into their new home.
e in the ninth
d, but it was-
hitting over- GUN AND BLADE MEETING
a wide mar-
wing he singl- Gun and Blade will hold a
ipled to score special 'meeting at 7:30 o'clock
nd in the sev- tonight at the Michigan Union
le, one of the fo+ the purpose of completing j
the local lot plans for the vets' vacation a.
in p'osition to I Camp Sheridan.
oin's double. The social direct'o'r of the camp
fighting every was in Ann Arbor Tuesday, and
ed, Bulled off completed plans for the trans-
venth inning portation of the men to Camp

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NO ACTION TAKEN
ON VET SOCIETY
Organization of the contemplated
University chapter of the Disabled Am
erican Veterans of the World War
which was tp have been effected las
evening, met with a serious drawbact
when a representative crowd failed tc
assemble. Charles C. Quitman, found
er of the organization, in an inter
view stated in part:
"There are' so few federal boari
students here this summer that non
of the other organizations can tak
any definite action with regard t
merging until the fall session. We do
not attempt to undertake any worl
that is being done by another organ
ization. Our 'sole 'aim is to aid the
disabled men."
The opinion that Gun'and Blade anc
the Disabled American Veterans woulc
merge into one society in the fall
when the latter had become well es
tablished, *as set forth by Mr. Quit
man.
"The association of the Gun am
Blade in Chicago took definite actioi
last week concerning the offer of th
Disabled ,American Veterans associa
tion," said James N. Donaldson, '21I:
president of the Gun and Blade club o
the University. "They decided not ti
affiliate with this new organization.
"I will have nothing whatever.t,
do with the Disabled American Veter
ans association nor its organizatioi
here in the University," said Earl C
Allmand, summer school student, las
evening. "I told Mr. Quitman that
would act as a temporary chairmai
of the organization, which he hone

whole.
The'orchestra,
Fay, supervisor o
in the public sch(
Y., who has been
the School of Mt
mer, played thre
differing characte
theyPrelude from
Suite,"' proved to

conducted by Jay W.
>t instrumenta'l music

Taylor, and given by the chorus, with
Mr.' Wheeler appearing as soloist, was
a choral work of great power and

PAUSE AND PONDER

ools of Rochester, N. beauty, and was presented in an admir-
n a guest teacher at able way by the chorus, but as it came
isic during the sum- at the end of a program already long
e numbers, of widely ;enough, the audience was tired, and
ar, of which the first did not seem to be in the mood to give
Bizet's "L'Arlesienne it the proper attention.
be perhaps the best Much credit should be given the ac-
companists, Alberta E. Waterbury
7 Light," by Gounod. Margaret Mason, and Russel Gee, who

Editor, The Wolverine:
People should stop buying'
where they find they are being
overcharged. The trouble with
people in Ann Arbor is that they
do not recognize the value of a
dollar; 'too many receive their
money from home or without
much real effort on their part.
H. F.C.,

! ac

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