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August 09, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S

I0~

intterine

THREE TIM
A WEEK

,. .

-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1921.

PRICE FIV

t __

Simplify Math, That We May Derive
More Ilenefit, Suggests Hedrick, '96

METHODS [N USE
AT CANOE LIVERlY
AGAIN ATTACKED'

.LI U "We must simplify mathematics and
Is make it morgepractical so that people
will learn to get the full benefits from
its use and overcome their fear of
"figgers" is the belief of Prof. E. R.
TAIN OP- Hedrick, '96, head of the department
IUES- of mathematics at the University of
Missouri.
"Instead of teaching history'by re-
quiring the memorizing of a lot of dates
TO the student is taught to learn the un-
RtSSION derlying causes of the different events,
Languages are now taught in such a
German way as to enable the student to learn
ral of to speak and understand the tongue
instead of memorizing the book. In
like manner there is still too much
ec Hust formalism in the science of mathe-
of the con- matics. We must get rid of some ofo
conflit of I
3r Silesiad
sion here .STUDENTSDOWN.
e insisted
r, togetherI
territory Uncon Avery, '20, and Emerson
d over. Jones, '22M, Are Lost While
Sallng
a diame- -
ver, and a COMAMNION, . EXHAUTED, IS
ed on the RESCUED FORM LAKE SHOREl
Ill be the-
strength Lincoln Avery, '20, of Port Huron,
il uen cand Emerson Jones, '22M, of Toledo,
were drowned Sunday morning in Hig-
ke at the inslake near Rosscommon. Avery
s returnwas a member of the local ch'apter of,
e name of Beta Theta Pi, and entered Harvard
preceded last fall, while Jones completed his{
i of wel- junior year in the Medical school last
.June.
in of- the The two men, together with some
Sian ques- friends were spending their vacations
i without at the summer home of the Avery fam-
ily at Higgins lake. With John' San-
cry derson, of St. Clair, Avery and Jones
:ios be- started on a sail- Sunday morning and
and Pre- were thrown overboard when theirt
factory, it boat capsized. The three started to
uncil met. swim toward a raft which was some
at length distance away but, becoming tired,
Geronda, started back toward the boat. Jones and
commis- Avery sank bef6re they reached it. San.-
$ur) sank . before they reached it. San-
derson, however, succeeded in gaining
the upturned boat and,.although in an
exhausted condition, was sent aid
from the shore and rescued: '
l Avery was the son of Mr. and Mrs.t
Lincoln Avery, of Port Huron. Jonesr
was the son of W. W. Jones, a Toledor
real estate man. Both young men
~G THEwere 24 years of age.
The two bodies were not recovered
until Sunday afternoon.
infer with NEW SOCIETY MAY
t ans in BE FORMED HERE
as to the h
e institu- Plans UtIder Way for Organization
of Vets
o say re-
ny taking Another organization may be rep-
id Profes- resented on the campus if plans now
"Little or under way for the establishment of a
n the past University chapter of the Disabled
to that, at American Veterans of the World War
Aug. 17, a are carried out. For the purpose of
formation, the initial meeting at 7:30
an oppor- o'clock tomorrow evening, in the Mich-
over with igan Union, with Earl C. Allman pre-

the more abstract and technical de-
tails and inject the newer and more
useful branches of calcutation.
"It is to modernize and standardize
the mathematical curriculum of our
educational system that the national'
committee on Mathematical Require-
ments is working," Professor Hen-
dricks continued. "This committee
represents the Mathematical Associa-
tion of America, the general educa-
tional board and the department of
the interior and has been able to ex-
ert a strong influence in the direction
of more practical mathematical re-
quirements in the schools of this coun-
try.
"While the time devoted to the
study of the subject will probably re-
main much the same, the aim of the.
committee is to cast out the technic-
alities and try to make mathematics
a genuine help to the student in all
of his attivities."
Professor Hedricks is an old Mich-
igan man, having received his A.B.'
here in '96. Later he studied at Har-
vard, 4Gottinge1, and Paris. From
1901 to 1903 he was instructor in
mathematics at Sheffield Scientific
school, and since that time has been
professor of mathematics at the Uni-
versity of Missouri. He was vice-,
president of the American Mathemat-
ical society in 1916 and president of
the Mathematical Association of Am-
erica the same year. He has also been
the author and editor of several ser-
ies of text-books for and a frequent
contributor to mathematical and edu-
cational journals,.
CONCEIRT SEIE
END TMORROW

Wi. F. LOWE, '23, REFUSED USE
FRIEND'S PRIVATE
ti . CANOE

OFI

WATERMAN PLANS
y TRIP TO LONDON
Dr. Leroy Waterman, professor of
semetic languages, will sale for Lon-
don, England, Aug. 26, to translate the
oringinal Cunieform texts of "Babylon-
ian and Assyrian Letters," copies of
which were published by R. F. Harper
in 1914.
These copies of the original texts
were contained in fourteen volumes
the last one having been edited by
Dr. Waterman after the death of Mr.
Harper. They are now located in the
British museum in London, and It is
here that Dr. Waterman will do the
translating. He expects to be occu-
pied with this work for about a month,
returning to America at the opening
of the first semester.
STRESSES VAL.UE
OF MA4THEMATICS

OF 'SCHEME F
SU MMER SPo
FEELS THAT AN ATHLETI
GRAM WOULD MAKE F
GOOD SPIRIT
READY TO BACK PLA
FOR BIG TEN G

ASSERTS OWNER ASKED
PERMISSION TO LEND
Later Carried Letter to Managemient;'
Claims Privilege Flatly
Denied
Additional complaints in regard to
the methods used by the Saunders'
canoe livery in the storing of private-
ly owned canoes have been registered,
since the publication of charges made
by one student, patron Saturday. The
principal gri'vance against the livery
apparently has to do with its regulation
which refuses to allow private canoes
stored there to be used by the friends
of their owners.
Two Incidents
William F. Lowe. '23, relates the
two following incidents:
During spring vacation, Lowe is said
to have gone with Eugene W. Marsh,
'22, to ,the boat house. "Marsh intro-
duced me to Saunders as his personal
friend," said Lowe, ."and then asked
that I be allowed to use his private
canoe, which was simply stored at the
livery. Saunders positively refused to
consider the request, however, even
though Marsh had personally introduc-
ed and. ,recommended me." Accord-
ing to Lowe, he and Marsh, indignant
at such treatment, then left the boat
house.
At another time, in the latter partx
of June, Lowe states that he went with
a letter -from William L. Bromley, '21,,
to Saunders asking his permission to
use Bromley's canoe. As evidence that
the letter was not fictitious, Lowe says
he carried the keys to Bromley's can-
oe locker. .
Refuses Request
On the grounds that Bromley was'
only a part owner of the canoe, how-
ever, Saunders is said to have refus-
ed this request, and would not con-
cede when Lowe assured him that the
other owner of the canoe was his per-
scnal friend and would give his per-
mission without hesitancy. Lowe says
he felt that in both cases he had been
the victim of an autocratic violation
of the common law of property rights.
Warren Created
Ambassador To,
japnRcnl

Rankin Bemoans Lack
lieves Contests a
Remedy

Prof.

Hedrick Shows Applicaoton of
Rules 'in Industry and
Schools
WE SHOULD REALIZE'
VALUE OF MATHEMATICS

I SAYS

Orchestra and Choral Union Will
ture Sixth Program of Sum-
mer Session

Fea-

JAY W. FAY, OF ROCHESTER, .
ALSO SCHEDULED TO APPEAR
Numbers by both the Summer Chor-
al union and the Summer School or-:
chestra will feature the, program of
the final concert to be given by the
members of othe University School of
Music at 8-o'clock tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium. This is the sixth of
a series of complimentary concerts
given by the School of Music.
The Choral union, consisting of
about 100 singers under the direction
of George Oscar Bowen, will offer sev-
eral selections, closing with "Hia-
watha's Wedding Feast," by Coleridge
Taylor.
Orchestra Will Play
The summer School orchestra of
about 30 players lead by Jay W. Fay,
supervisor ofhinstrumentalstmusic in
the public schools of Rochester, N. Y.,
who has been a guest teacher at the
School of Music during the summer,
will also contribute some numbers.
William Wheeler, tenor, will appear
as soloist in the choral work, while
Carl Lindegren, head of thevoice de-
partment of the Michigan State Nor-
mal college will also sing two groups
of songs. Accompaniments will be
played by Alberta E. Waterbury, Mar-
garet Mason and Russel Gee.
Program Given

"The one. great idea 'which is suf-
ficient in scope in mathematics is that
of functional ration, and it is of
fundamental importance to everyone,"
said Prof E. R. Hedrick, of the de-t
partment of mathematics at the Uni-
versity of Missouri, in a lecture he
delivered at 8 o'clock, yesterday eve-t
ding in the Natural Science auditor-
ium, on the subject "Function in High
School Mathematics."
Professor Hedrick is lecturing un-t
der the auspices of the National Com-
mission on Mathematical Require-
ments, whose purpose is, among oth-
er things,' to improve the-methods of
teaching mathematics in the schools
Do Not See Significance
"There iay be many who do not1
realize how much this relation enters
modern life, and do not understand
the practical significance in this idea.
It gives the students a better view of
life, and a better grasp on civiliza-
tion," said Professor Hedrick.
"A scientific problem, is per se, tc
find out how one quantity affects an-
other. Thus the most common prob-
lem in business, that of interest, lies
in the relation of rate and amount
of interes.t. Mathematics is always a
consideration of the relations between
quantities, and wee must teach the
child to understand this to be thei
case.
"The first page of the text-book inI
alegbra has this relationship. It ex-
plains the use of letters for numbers,1
Second Step
"The next step is the so-called
practical problem, every one of which
deals with a relationship between twot
things. The child must be brought1
to realize this relation between thet
first unknown asnd the other quantity.
"In the same way we come to the]
more complicated problems. This1
growth from the simple to the comple'x
is what keepspeople from making
foolish mistakes."
"Numerical tables, interest tables
squares and roots of numbers, and
logs are coming into greater use. Their
understanding is not as simple as most
people think. They 'must realize that
there is a relation."
VAN BOVEN MAKING GOOD
IN GRAND RAPIDS LEAGUE
Peter J. (Pete) Van Boven, 1921 Var-
sity baseball captain, is making good
in the Central league at Grand Rap-
ids. According to the batting aver-
ages just published, Pete is swatting
the horsehide for .300. Including the
games played last Thursday, Van Bov-
en has participated in 16 games, been
at bat 60 itimes, scored nine runs, and
ponded out 18 hits for a total of 21
bases.

PRflUf TALAMORi
Of LIFE of

Speaking of the proposed inau
ation of intercollegiate summer
letics, Dean E. H. Kraus of the S
mer will emphasize the fact that co
Monday that "sooner or later they
have to come." He believes that c
petition in athletics during the s
mer will emphasie the fact that co
es of study given then are ident
with those given during the reg
year.
Would Welcome Games
"The educators here taking sum
work would welcome the sight of
legiate games," remarked Dean Kr
"We want to 'impress upon the m
of all students that 67 per cent of
summer enrollment are regular
dents and not merely those who
delinquent or who attend only in
summer; it is a regular Univer
session and regular University inst
tors give their courses." He'is of
opinion that Conference games
aid in maintaining the spirit and
afford an outlet for athletic energy
the great advantage of every studer
attendance.
Dean Kraus added that what
changes in the Summer session
gram of lectures and entertainm
were necessary, could easily be t
care of, and games on Friday
(Continued on Page Four)

II

CALLS

HIM 3MOST STRIK]

FRENCH DRAMATIC
SIFIERS

"The opportunity for vocational ed-
ucation for those tivlo are lax in
knowledge will place the organization
on a higher plane than any other
veteran organization now in exist-
ance," is the claim of .Charles C. Quit-
man who founded the organization at
the University of Cincinnati, for the
purpose of helping the disabled sold-
iers of the World War. Many sum-
mer camps and large hotels are to be
used in helping the government care
for these men.
The present membership of the or-
ganization is 60,000, and is increasing
at the rate of 8,000 a month, accord-
(Continued on Page Four)

Charles B. Warren, an alummnus of.
the University, was recently appoint-
ed by President Harding' as ambas-
sador to Japan.
Mr. Warren is a lawyer in De-
troit. He entered the University of
Michigan with the class of '91, and then
went to the Detroit College of Law
where lie received his LL.B. He re-
ceived his Ph.B. later, and an hon-
orary A M. in 1916.
He was the associate counsel for
the United States government before
the joint high commission to determ-
ine thdBehring sea; claims in 1896
and cpunsel for the government in the
North Atlantic coast fisheries arbitra-
tion case before the Hague tribunal in
1910.
Mr. Warren achieved considerable
distinction during the World War. He
entered the service as a major in the
reserve corps and judge advocate in
the adjutant-general's department.'He
was promoted to the rank of a lieuten-
ant-colonel on Feb. 13, 1918, and to a'
full. colonel on July 19 of the same
year.
He was awarded the D. S. C. for ex-
ceptional service during the war.

"Edmond Rostand" was thel
ject of the lecture given by Prof.
Talamon, at 5 o'clock yesterday
noon, in the Natural Science aud
ium. The lecture was delivered i
French tongue.
He told the gist of the life of :
and. He was born at Marseill,
well-to-do parents with cul
tastes, and received his educatio
private schools where his na
tastes were developed. He comp
a course in the College Stanisla
Paris, and then took 'up the stud
law, in 'which he made his degre
soon gave up the law for his/lit
activities. A little volume of
entitled "Les Musardises" was ai
effort, followed Ir his mock-h
comedy in verse, "Les Romanesq
which was well received by the p
"La Princesse Lointaine," "La. Sar
acne," were his next Ventures int
field of poetic drama.
His most masterful work is "C
de Bergerac," which sent Paris
ecstasies. After this came "L'Ai,
and his last play "Chanticler."
died in 1918, shortly after the
pletion of the plvy.
Professor Talamon said that E.
Rostand was the most strikin
ample of the French school of
atic versifiers, who came into
inence in the nineteenth ce
Poetic drama was not at first
well received, but became popula
der the hand of Rostand, and h:
leagues.

The full program is as follows:
Prelude from "L'Arlesienne Suite"
. . .... ...Bizet
Orchestra
"Send Out Thy Light".......Gounod
Chorus and Orchestra
Some Rival Has Stolen My True
Love Away .... .....Oldt nglish
L'Angelus ......Bourgault-Ducoudray
Le Tambour Major (LeCaid)..Thomas
Carl Lindegren
(Continued on Page Four)

I

.,. --- z.

TICKETS NOW AT WAHR'S FOR

Friday

" The

Servant,

in

the

House"

Au

Presented by Prof. Hollister's class in Play Production
n-- - T"T7A S -

Prv~d 7-5v

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