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August 04, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 A 1 JJ ff V L v L 1\ A 1\ L..a

TWO COMMUNICATIONS CRITICIZELOCAL ER S

SODA PRICE BALLOT

UI

the

Men wishing- to serve as up-
perclass advisers next year are
requested to fill out the enclos-
ed coupon and mail to the Union
or hand in at the main desk
immediately.
I desire to serve as an up-
perclass adviser next year.
Name...................
Address ...............
Class ....................

SHOULD NOT STOP WITH ICE-
CREAM PRICE BOOSTERS, SAYS
JUNIOR
Editor, The Wolverine:
We have heard much, here of late,
about the ice cream and sundae prof-
iteers. But why stop there? A com-
plete registry might well include-such
places of ,business as gents' furnish-
ing places, stationers and bookstores,
shoe stores, jewelry stores, confec-

GRA1D THINKS IT'S RUBBING IT
IN TO CONTINUE ASKING WAR
PRICES
Editor, The Wolverine:
While making a trip dower the Great
Lakes recently, I had cause to remem-

Cut out and mail to:
Editor, The Wolverine,
Press Building,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
(Mark X before statement of your opinion)
[ ] I believe the prices charged for sodas and sundaes in
Ann Arbor are too high, and should be reduced.
[ I I believe the prices charged for sodas and sundaes in
Ani Arbor are not too high.
Name.... ..................

I ! li

I

"ampbell Department ....................
artment,
"Greek Phone No.................
Tuesday {
ence au-
2 the as-
end 'is ingratiating the gods gave a hold on
. of that them," said Professor Bonner. The
Greek who desired magic to be done,'
nt, Pro- made rayers to certain gods. After
xamples. a while there came' to be certain set
water on forms to be gone through in the ex-
swar n hortation of the gods. A series of pe-
s was a
man who culiar and elaborate preparations were
ra h made, the man uttered various charms .
ny fash- nd
stuck it and ystical formulas, and awaited re-
stuck sults One charm has even beenl
is qremy found which was guaranteed to drive
manner.
s of Au- away fleas.
stick all Professor Bonner concluded the len-
prints of ture with a series of slides which 11-
at they lustrated some of these performances
of magic.
at there
een mag- DEFEAT OF LIQUOR BILL 'IN
re was a SENATE IS PREDICTED
afn. "Re-
nmunity, Washington, Aug. 4. -- Reports"
magical that the senate "wets" had mustered
t social enough votes to recomnit the Willis-
.sted," he Campbell anti-beer bill were scouted
Wednesday by the "dry" leaders, al-
:omplish- though some opponents of the blI
rms, and expressed confidence of its defeat in
c was in- its present form. A final vote before
ermediar- the week-end recess Friday is hoped
to cer- for by the "drys"S but opponents
eved that promised extensive .discussion.

tioneries, and eating houses.
In the not too remote past, the
writer happened in an "eating-house"
which opens its doors onto State
street. After waiting nearly a half
an hour and twice giving his order, h'e
was served with three pieces of toast,
daintily exposed to small portions of
butter, a glass of milk, and two eggs
with toast, all for the paltry and, mod-
est sum of 35 cents.
To say the least, 35 cents is not
much and, .one might say, not worth
making a noise over. But a criti-
cism can hardly be sustained on these
grounds. A careful perusal of data
and statistics gathered leads one to
the conclusion that the price men-
tioned can hardly be justified on the
grounds of reasonableness..
No enterprise has a rght to extort
unreasonable prices simply because
it enjoys an advantageous position.
For instance, we are, wondering why
only one clothing store is able to re-
duce some of its prices nearly 75 per
cent; why only one confectionery is
able to make a substantial reduction
in its prices; why, of two stores near
each other, one charges double that of
the other for safety matches of equal
quality; 'hy one of the book stores
should buy back one of its second-
hand at about 40 Vper cent of the
price at which it was sold to the stu-
dent and then resell it at a price near
the original figure.
There are many students who are in
debt on their education, others who
find it necessary to spend the regular
year in business or in teaching in or-
der to return summers to complete
their education, while still others
leave Ann Arbor each year because
they find it impossible to Meet ex-
penses. To ask these people to pay
the prices demanded by many of the
men about the campus can hardly'
come within the pale of conscien-
tiousness. Despite the' difficulties,
which the industrial situation has
placed in the way of those in financial
need, we find the price of necessities,
clothes, books, stationery, room and
board, things everyone must have, not
materially changed.
Necessities occupy a transcendent
place in our expense accounts and'
cannot be dispensed with as easily as
the luxuries. Unless this seeming
attitude of "charging what the traf-
fic will bear" gives way to one of
more consideration for the student
body, Michigan cannot hold, as she has
in days past, the offer of an education
at a nominal cost.
As a way out of this embarrassing
situation, we suggest that if any of
the business men feel that they have
been unduely criticised, an auditing
committee be appointed to go over the
books of the merchant in question
so- as tto'establish clearly whether or
not the merchant has been unduely
criticised as a profiteer.
G. R. B., '23.

her our little local soda-water war.
Aboard ship, prices of egg malted
milks were 25 cents, plain maltedf
milks 20 cents. It would appear that
at times when we expect to get "soak-
ed", we are happily fooled, while in
"dear old Ann Arbor" we get soaked
as a matter'of course, chiefly because{
it is thought that we cannot help our-
selves.
During the war no one raised anya
objection to advances in prices. Prices1
rose in every line of business and the
merchants made their profits - as.
did the abused vendors of cooling re-
freshments.
Now prices are going down, and
merchants all over the country are1
pocketing their losses gameky - as
they pocketed their profits on the rise.
This, the soda water people will have
to do along with the rest. To ask the'
people of Ann Arbor to continue pay-
ing war prices for refreshments when
the prices for other commodities are'
reducing, is rubbing it in.
It) has been suggested. that, if the
Ann Arbor merchants are unable, to
she how they can afford to ctt their
prices they should take A day off and
visit some of the surrounding townsj
where they will learn how the trick
may be accomplished.
What is needed in Ann Arbor is a
little lively competition. This would
teach some of the methods that en-
able prices to be cut/and a legitimate
profit to be made. Lacking this, as
apparently we do, a concerted boy-
cott appears to be the only method
that 'will give Ann Arbor patrons
praces such as those enjoyed by sur-
rounding towns.
JOSEPH A. AVERY, Grad.
IRISH PEACE DELAYED BY
CONFERENCE WITH ULSTER
Negotiations .between Eamonn Dea
Valera and Sir James Craig, premier
of Ulster, were given as the reason
for the silence on the Irish peace
question the last few days, according
tO a Dublin dispatch. Communication
is not being carried on between the
two leaders personally but by means
of couriers.
Excellent progress in the peace ne-
gotiations is reported by Sinn Fein
leaders. The Unionist government hai
studied the plan and has forwarded its
decisions to the London officials.

Address..........................

Remarks: ............................
.

COACHES APPROVE ,t
SUMMER CONTESTS
(Continued from Page One)
Coach Yost also suggested that men
playing in summer school, especially'
if some of the winter ,sports were tol
be included in the program, would beI
led on to greater efforts, simply be-t
cause of the fact that the possibilityt
f making the team would be near in
the point of time.
Keeps 'Athletes Busy
"You'll worh arder ii pay day Is
only a weCk off than if it iA some-
Swhere out there in the- future, you
know," he said. "Pay day is the day
a fellow makes the team, that is what!
I always call it on the football field
and you know 'a fellow will give you
all he has if he thinks he can make.
the team. I know, it always works that
way, and this summer school plan
would give the fellows something to
work for."
Coach Yost has just some back from.
a trip through the South, having, re-
turned Tuesday afternoon by way of
Chicago. He will leave the last of
the week for the East, where he will
visit the summer coaching schools of
Harvard and Columbia *universities.
Coach Mather when approached
upon the idea of summer activities in
college sports, said: "It looks like a
good proposition to me. None of my
'branches of sports could be played in
summer, but I don't see why it would
not be a good plan to work out for,
sports -such- as baseball, tennis, and
golf. I would be strongly in favor
of it, althoughI an not sure just how
the details would be worked out."
Track Men Need Rest
Coach Steve Farrel expressed a
similar view as to the. usefulness of
such a scheme for sports such as base-
ball and tennis. In regard to track,
however, Steve was not enthusiastic.
"It would hardly be possible to get;
enough men 'out for a track meet in
the summer," he said. "Track is aj
sport hichl requires a man to be in

l
the best physical condition and few of
the men taking the coaching courses
could keep up the training all the year.
Track men had better take a vacation
in the summer or they will not be
physically fit after training all wint-
er. My track men are in training all
winter up until the Conference meet
in June, and they have to have a rest
or they will'go stale. For other sports
the plan looks good:"
OFFICIAL NOTICES

All noticcs fo;r this column should
le in the hands of Oscar . Buhr,
Assistant to the President, by 9:3
o'clock on the morning of each day
of issue, Tuesday, Thursday, addSat-
urday.

*swim at Whit
We call for you
Round Trip. Trip
vial arrangement.
)perated--not a Taxi

A group picture of the Men's Educa-
tional club will be taken at 6:45
o'clock Thursday afternoon on the
steps of Alumni Memorial hall. All
the members are asked to be present.
Federal board students who .expect
to attend the Veterans' Vacation camp
.at Fort Sheridan, Ill., are asked to
meet at 7:30 o'clock Thursday eve-
nine, in room 318, Union.
JAMES C. STEVENS,
Secretary, Gun and Blade Club.
There Will be a meeting of the Gun
and Blade club at 7:30 Thursday eve-
ning in room 318 of the Union to dis-
cuss arrangements and plans for
reaching the summer camp at Ft.
! Sheridan, which is being held for the
University Vocational Trainees. It is
urgent that all men planning the trip
should be present at this meeting, in
order to express their desires as to
date of leaving.
JAMES C. STEVENS,
Sec. Gun and Blade.
The Women's league will hold a
party this afternoon in the parlors of
+3arbour gymnasium. There will be
dancing from 4 to 6 o'clock.'

CONKLIN

WATERM,
Sv

Subscribe to 'the Wolverine.
for the rest of the Summer.-Adv.

$.75

L VLRSHA RI

FYNE
'OCKS
Fuller
ewkrs,

POINT

U -

S -E C. ON D.. -H A * D

BOOKS

F OR A LL D E PA R T M E N T S
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS \will find the Right Prices at

I

WA

a of our Fall
early, before
sarts----

UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORES

" _

a
tv

Icolim
Street

flttll tt lil11 1 lIl l i ori l il i lf l i
iNeeds
Chairs, Tables, Water and 5
ip Rubber Boots, Ponchos, ,
Mess Cans, Knap Sacks, 5
i, etc.
Wall, Auto-Touro, Child-

MICHIGAN 3RD IN
SUMMER INCREASE
With an increase in enrollment of
28.8 per cent over last year, Michigan's
Summer school ranks third among
those of colleges and universities, ac-
cording to statistics . recently com-
piled by Dean E. H. yKraus of the
Summer session.
Pennsylvania leads with an in-
crease of 37 per cent, Minnesota is
second with 30 per cent, and Wiscon-
sin is fourth with 27 per cent. Colum-
bia, with 11,765, has by far the largest
summer enrollment, while California,
Chicago, Wisconsin, and Michigan fol-
low in the order named.
The various Summer session enroll-
ments for 1920 and 1921, respective-
ly, given in the complete list given out
by DeanKraus are as follows: Mich-
igan 2,194, 2,825; Columbia 9,685, 11,-
765; California 6,451, 7,857; !Chicago
5,406, (no figures for 1921); Wiscon
sin 3,578, 4,535; Minnesota 2,039,
2,650; New York 1,750, 2,005; Penn-
-sylvania 1,281, 1,750; Indiana 1,402,
1,632; Iowa 1,290, 1,600; Northwest-
ern 1,158, 1,415; Syracuse 610, 710;
Boston 558, 673.

Shirts hava eputation
If there is anything more uncomfortable than an ill-fitting
shirt we would like to know it, some shirts ate more like
straight-jackets than anything else.

Tents

Eagle Shirts Fit
right around the collar, easily over the shoulder with plenty of
room in the body. It's a comfot'to wear them. $4.oo and $3.50
value's special this week,
Marathon Belt Week
See our Window 's and get your's Today

Breeches
Corduroy, Serge,
haki and Ponge
es Khaki Outing
85, others priced

J r

IGH CLASS FOOD

I1

r'uertA

I

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